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T & p week 1 upload version

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Keynote presentation for Week One of Theory and Practice

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T & p week 1 upload version

  1. 1. THEORY AND PRACTICE Week One - 28th September 2011 Justine Mortimer & Paul Carter
  2. 2. Who are you?
  3. 3. Why are you here?
  4. 4. Quick Exercise
  5. 5. Quick Exercise Get into pairs
  6. 6. Quick Exercise Get into pairsTell each other ONE thing you have learned in the last week
  7. 7. Quick Exercise Get into pairsTell each other ONE thing you have learned in the last week Now question your partner
  8. 8. Quick Exercise Get into pairsTell each other ONE thing you have learned in the last week Now question your partner How did they learn that thing?
  9. 9. Quick Exercise Get into pairsTell each other ONE thing you have learned in the last week Now question your partner How did they learn that thing? Where?
  10. 10. Quick Exercise Get into pairsTell each other ONE thing you have learned in the last week Now question your partner How did they learn that thing? Where? What was important about it?
  11. 11. Quick Exercise Get into pairsTell each other ONE thing you have learned in the last week Now question your partner How did they learn that thing? Where? What was important about it? What are you going to do with what you have learned?
  12. 12. LEARNING OUTCOMES• An understanding of a range of critical approaches to the study of media•Adeveloping understanding of the relationship between media texts and their cultural and historical contexts•A developing understanding of the relationship between theory and practice• Developing skills in textual analysis and an awareness of institutional context
  13. 13. LEARNING OUTCOMESThese aren’t just any outcomes. . . these are MediaProduction outcomesWe use these to develop your assessment criteria (Morelater . . .)
  14. 14. WHY THEORY?(It all looked like fun on the open day!)
  15. 15. WHAT WILL THEORY DO FOR (TO) ME • Gives you a framework for your production work • Helps you understand the industry and its practices • Provides a shared language • Improves your ability to judge your own work • Stops you appearing silly • (Impresses parents)
  16. 16. BUT IT’S JUST READING (ISN’T IT?)
  17. 17. BUT IT’S JUST READING (ISN’T IT?) NO
  18. 18. THEORY IS:• Talking• Thinking• Analysing• Doing• Creating• Understanding• (...and reading)
  19. 19. ‘GRADUATENESS’
  20. 20. THEORY IS NOT:• Unnecessary• Waffle• Boring• Big words• Funny (dead French) people
  21. 21. WHY STUDY THE MEDIA?
  22. 22. WHY STUDY THE MEDIA? • Interesting • Ubiquitous • Novelty? • Constantly Changing • Need • Economy - Numbers involved • Growing Industry • Political significance - POWER
  23. 23. WHAT IS ‘THE MEDIA’?
  24. 24. WHAT IS ‘THE MEDIA’?• Advertising • Posters• Images? • Newspapers• Communication? • Television• Film • Telecoms• Radio • Animation• Websites • Music• Magazines • PR
  25. 25. WHAT IS NOT ‘THE MEDIA’?• Notcovered on the programme: • Journalism • Art of photography • Celebrity • Games • Music Production
  26. 26. MEDIA TEXTS• What is a text?• Analysis vs Consumption• All media texts are constructions• You cannot analyse a text too deeply
  27. 27. TOOLS FOR ANALYSIS • Why do we need tools? • Objectivity vs Subjectivity
  28. 28. AESTHETICSAnalysis, context & media literacy
  29. 29. AESTHETICS• Branch of Philosophy dealing with beauty and the ‘nature’ of art, particularly universal features or commonalities• Study beginning with the Ancient Greeks: • Plato - proportion and harmony • Aristotle - order and symmetry
  30. 30. MODERN AESTHETICS• Immanuel Kant “Our faculty of judgment that enables us to have experience of beauty and grasp those experiences as part of an ordered, natural world with purpose” (IEP)• Friedrich Schiller “Aesthetic education is necessary, he argued, not only for the proper balance of the individual soul, but for the harmonious development of society.” (Taylor 2003)
  31. 31. CRITIQUED BY• e.g. TerryEagleton - in the late twentieth century, notions of ‘universality’ are questioned• Aesthetics seen as intertwined with politics and ethics
  32. 32. TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY• Renewed interest in ‘screen aesthetics’• Implicit focus on ‘artistic merit’• Inorder to illuminate ways in which audiovisual work may be effective, affective or thoughtful• Also how film expresses philosophical ideas
  33. 33. ALL OF THIS ISCONSTRUCTED - NOT ACCIDENTAL - AND ANALYSTS ARE CONCERNED WITH CONTEXT
  34. 34. WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?
  35. 35. MEDIA LITERACY• ‘the ability to access, understand and create communications in a variety of contexts.’• ‘Ata more advanced level it moves from recognising and comprehending information to the higher order critical thinking skills such as questioning, analysing and evaluating that information.’ Ofcom (2010)
  36. 36. In explaining visual literacy, Messaris (1994) listed four specificbenefits that apply equally to media literacy:(a) It is a prerequisite for the comprehension of how the world isstructured for the screen,(b) the cognitive skills that are brought into play in the interpretationof television may be applicable to other intellectual tasks,(c) it will help to make the viewer aware of how meaning is created inmedia presentations, and . . .(d) it provides the basis for aesthetic appreciation(Zettl 1998, 83)
  37. 37. HOW THINGS LOOK ANDSOUND INFLUENCE HOW WE RESPOND TO THEM
  38. 38. PRODUCTION AS ‘AESTHETIC VARIABLE’Silverblatt (1995) list[s] four major “keys” that provideinsight into interpreting media messages: process,context, structure, and production values. He is oneof the few people who lists aesthetic variables (i.e.,production values) as one of the primary keys foranalysis. (Zettl, 1998, p 81)
  39. 39. End Point (Meta Cognition) Starting Point
  40. 40. THE ROLE OF INFLUENCES
  41. 41. WHERE DO PRODUCERSDRAW THEIR INFLUENCES FROM?
  42. 42. WHAT DREAMS MAY COME
  43. 43. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ztOiZl2ZHck&feature=related
  44. 44. From Hamlet, Act 3, Scene 1"To sleep: perchance to dream: ay, theres the rub; For in that sleep of death what dreams may come When we have shuffled off this mortal coil . . . “
  45. 45. OTHER LITERARY ALLUSIONS THE DIVINE COMEDY (DANTE ALIGHIERI)GREEK MYTH (ORPHEUS & EURYDICE)
  46. 46. ARTISTIC INFLUENCESCASPAR DAVID FRIEDRICH CLAUDE MONET VINCENT VAN GOGH HIERONYMUS BOSCH SALVADOR DALI
  47. 47. Landscape with Solitary Tree, 1822, Caspar David Friedrich
  48. 48. Wanderer Abovethe Sea of Fog, 1818, CasparDavid Friedrich
  49. 49. Der Morgen, 1820-21,Caspar David Friedrich
  50. 50. Rocky Ravine, 1822-33,Caspar David Friedrich
  51. 51. The Poppy Field near Argenteuil, 1873, Claude Monet
  52. 52. Path at Giverny, 1885, Claude Monet
  53. 53. Irises, 1889, Vincent Van Gogh
  54. 54. Christ in Limbo, circa 1575, ‘Follower of Hieronymus Bosch’
  55. 55. The Garden of Earthly Delights, circa 1510, Hieronymus Bosch
  56. 56. La Cara de la Guerra, 1940, Salvador Dali
  57. 57. Metamorphosis of Narcissus, 1937, Salvador Dali
  58. 58. SO, WHICH MOVIE SCENEDREW INSPIRATION FROM THIS?
  59. 59. Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion, 1944, Francis Bacon
  60. 60. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uuapyExYJBI
  61. 61. WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT?
  62. 62. BREADTHPRODUCERS MUST BEINTERESTED IN MORE THAN JUST TECHNOLOGY
  63. 63. A MAJOR ROLE OF EDUCATION IS THE ACQUISITION OFCULTURAL CAPITAL
  64. 64. FOR NEXT WEEK . . .• Pleaseensure you have read the first chapter of Long & Wall - on ‘rhetoric’• Read the module handbook• Complete the first online assignment ‘Working in the Media’

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