Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Global education reform

352 views

Published on

ระบบการศึกษาของประเทศที่เสนอในหนังสือ Global Education Reform : How Privatization and Public Investment Influence Education Outcomes โดยเสนอในลักษณะของผลงานวิจัย

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Global education reform

  1. 1. Global Education Reform How Privatization and Public Investment Influence Education Outcome May 2016 Monday, May 02, 2016 ร่าง 4.0
  2. 2. Global Educational Reform offers a comparative look at the education policies and outcomes in six countries – Chile, Cube, Sweden, Finland, Canada, and the United States. Frank and his co- editors selected these countries because collectively they span a range of education policy approaches – from neoliberal approaches that emphasize school vouchers to social democratic approaches that emphasize government’s responsibility for education. 2
  3. 3. Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWWtD-JQNH8 Published on Feb 3, 2016 Global Education Reform: How Privatization and Public Investment Influence Education Outcomes ​Dr. Frank Adamson, Stanford University, USA adamson@stanford.edu Dr. Björn Åstrand, Karlstad University, Sweden bjorn.astrand@kau.se For more information, go to http://mpeducation.weebly.com/ We will present key ideas from our forthcoming book - Global Education Reform: How Privatization and Public Investment Influence Education Outcomes - which offers a comparative analysis of policies and outcomes in countries pursuing either market-based, privatizing or government-based, public investment approaches to education. The book spans six countries organized into three geographically proximate pairs: 1) Chile and Cuba, 2) Sweden and Finland, and 3) Canada and the United States. Each pair contains one country trending towards privatization while the other employs a public investment approach. Authors from each country (except for Cuba) provide individual case studies. We will synthesize these in framing (introductory) and comparative chapters that reveal the higher levels of equity and outcomes occurring in countries using the public investment approach to education.​ 3
  4. 4. Global Education Reform: How Privatization Versus Public Investment Influences Education Outcomes Symposium AERA 2016 April ,11,2016 Linda Darling-Hammond, Stanford University Frank M. Adamson, Stanford University A new set of national education policies is sweeping across the planet. The specifics vary by country, but the underlying principle is that market- based systems deliver education better than governments. This symposium analyzes six different countries that have pursued two different strategies, privatization and public investment, that test this principle. Chile, Sweden, and the U.S. have launched major initiatives with market-based strategies, including publically funding privately operated schools and employing market-based approaches to teaching as an occupation. Conversely, nearby nations, Cuba, Finland, and Canada, have made strong and equitable investments in public education, including strengthening the profession of teaching. Comparing these different approaches suggests that education systems using strong state investments produce higher quality outcomes than employing market- based principles 4 http://convention2.allacademic.com/one/aera/aera16/index.php?&obf_var=4389688&PHPSESSID=9089qboct5hrui9dfpnmqmdgv3
  5. 5. Spectrum of Selected Countries, By Approaches to Governance, Economics, and Education Educational/ Approaches/ Outcomes Focus on teacher professionalization, government responsibility for education Vouchers/Charters/ Market seek to augment or replace public system Governance Approach Social-democratic command Neoliberal “Free Market” Economic Priorities Public Investment / State Management Privatization / Deregulation / Decentralization Countries Studied Finland Cuba Sweden Canada United States Chile Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Linda Darling Hammond , Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes 2016 5
  6. 6. Scandinavia North America Caribbean / South America Public Investment Finland Canada Cuba Privatization Sweden USA Chile Policy Driver Privatization Economic Rational Choice Educational Mechanism : Vouchers Primary Elements of Chile’s GERM Approach to Education Country Pairs, by Region and Type of Education System Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Linda Darling Hammond , Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes 2016 6
  7. 7. 7 Policy Driver Economic Rationales Educational Mechanisms Key Elements of National Education Systems Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes presentation Feb 2016
  8. 8. 8 Policy Driver • Privatization • Deregulation • Decentralization • Liberaization Economic Rationales Educational Mechanisms Neoliberal Approach Education • Efficiency • Choice/ Competition/ Quality Axis • Scarce resources • Equity • Vouchers • Charter Schools • School Markets • Market-based teaching • Test-based accountability Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes presentation Feb 2016
  9. 9. 9 Policy Driver • Public Ownership • Public Responsibility • Equity • Democratic Decisions Economic Rationales Educational Mechanisms Public Investment Approaches Education • Universal access • Preparing citizens • Equity • Well-prepared teachers • Equitable funding of schools • High-quality infrastructure • Whole-child curriculum and pedagogy Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes presentation Feb 2016
  10. 10. Different National Approaches to Education Policy Drivers Economic Rationales Educational Mechanisms Chile Privatization Choice Vouchers U.S. Privatization Choice Charters Sweden Deregulation Competition Market Cuba Public Responsibility Universal access Well prepare teachers Canada Democratic Decision Preparing citizen Whole-child curriculum and pedagogy Finland Equity Preparing citizen Well prepare teachers 10 Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes presentation Feb 2016
  11. 11. 11 1. Policy Driver 2. Economic Rationales 3. Educational Mechanisms Key Element of National Education Systems Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Linda Darling Hammond , Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes 2016
  12. 12. Questions Neoliberal Public investment Policy driver 1.Who decides issues of ownership and investment? 2.What processes and actions are defined as legal? 3.At what level of governance do decisions happen ? • Privatization • Deregulation • Decentralization • Liberalization • Public Ownership • Public Responsibility • Equity • Democratic Decisions Economic Rationales 1.What are the main goals of education system ? 2.Who’s responsible for providing education ? 3.How much do different approach cost ? • Efficiency • Choice/competition/quality • Scare resources(apparent) • Equity • Universal access • Preparing citizens for economy and Democracy • Equity Education Mechanisms 1.What’s the best delivery mechanism for education ? 2.What curriculum get taught? 3.How do we know if students learn? • Vouchers • Charter schools • School Markets • Market-based teaching • Test-based accountability • Well-prepared teachers • Equitable funding of schools • High-quality infrastructure • Whole-child curriculum and pedagogy 12 Compare Neoliberal & Public Investment Approaches Education Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Linda Darling Hammond , Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes 2016
  13. 13. 13 Chile US Sweden Finland Canada Cuba 1980 1990 2000s 2010s GERM begins: Pinochet’s voucher system GERM case: Milwaukee voucher program Germ cases: Charter school movement and New Orleans reform Germ case: School system marketized Non Germ approach begins : Equity-based system GERM Immunity : High PISA test score Germ resisted Voucher program overturned in 2003 Public Investment approach: Professional capacity building Public Investment approach: Investment in teachers Germ protection: trade sanctions /command economy prevents neoliberal ideas and policies, until 2015 Tracking the Global Education Reform Movement (GERM) Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes presentation Feb 2016
  14. 14. Chile Several years later, with the military occupying every city in the country, citizens approved the dictatorial Constitution of 1980. This paved the way for privatization in all sectors of government. Starting in 1981 , a series of measures that completely transformed the education system was put into place. These included “modernization” to institutions(including education) enacted by the military Junta, including 1. Tuition charged for education , except for high-poverty students 2. State subsidies provided to private schools 3. Vouchers attached to student attendance 4. Tertiary education subject to fees 5. Decentralization of administration to municipalities 6. Implementation of national student testing(the SIMCE assessment) 7. Teachers no longer treated as public servants, but subject to general labor laws. Out comes The protests are directed at the fact that , after 32 years of having applied the regulations dictated by the Military Junta, public schools declined tremendously in quality while families has to pay for private schools to gain marginally better quality. Of course, the private school serving the wealthiest students score most highly on the national tests. However, despite the common perception that private school are superior to public school , recent data show that – controlling for socioeconomic status-both the lowest-income students and those are middle class do better in public schools, on average, than similar students in the subsidized private school. 14 Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Linda Darling Hammond , Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes 2016
  15. 15. (ร่าง) กรอบทิศทางแผนการศึกษาแห่งชาติ พ .ศ.๒๕๖๐- ๒๕๗๔ 15
  16. 16. Question for Education Community 1. How and why would models like these benefit your community ? 2. How can education systems ensure equity ? 3. How can we increase public understanding how different education systems work ? 16 Frank Adamson, Björn Åstrand, Global education reform How privatization and public investment influence education outcomes presentation Feb 2016
  17. 17. หลักการ/แนวคิดการจัดการศึกษา (Conceptual Design) • รัฐมีหน้าที่กํากับดูแลและบริหารจัดการให้มีบริการการศึกษาที่เพียงพอกับความ ต้องการของผู้เรียน เพื่อเป็นหลักประกัน ให้กับพลเมืองในการได้รับการศึกษาและการเรียนรู้ที่มี คุณภาพและมาตรฐาน เพื่อพัฒนาทักษะ ความรู้ ความสามารถ และ สมรรถนะในการทํางาน ของแต่ละบุคคลให้ไปได้ไกลที่สุดเท่าที่ศักยภาพและความสามารถของแต่ละบุคคลพึงมี ทั้ง การศึกษาในระบบ การศึกษานอกระบบ การศึกษาตามอัธยาศัย ด้วยระบบการศึกษาที่มี ความยืดหยุ่น หลากหลาย สนองตอบความต้องการของผู้เรียนในแต่ละช่วงวัย ตั้งแต่ เกิดจนตลอดชีวิต • รัฐสามารถเข้ามามีส่วนร่วมในการจัดการศึกษา แต่รัฐไม่จําเป็นต้องเป็นผู้จัดการศึกษาทั้งหมด เพื่อให้ทุกภาคส่วน ของสังคมที่มีศักยภาพและความพร้อมเข้ามามีส่วนร่วมในการจัดการศึกษา ภายใต้กฎ กติกาการแข่งขันอย่างเป็นธรรม • โอกาสและความเสมอภาคของพลเมืองในการได้รับบริการการศึกษาที่ดีและมีคุณภาพด้วยความ เสมอภาคและเป็นธรรม มิได้หมายความว่า ผู้เรียนทุกคนจะได้รับการศึกษาจากสถานศึกษาที่มี คุณภาพและมาตรฐานสูงเท่ากันทุกคน เนื่องจากคุณภาพและมาตรฐานของแต่ละสถานศึกษามี ความแตกต่างกันอย่างมาก และรัฐก็ไม่สามารถดําเนินการให้ทุก สถานศึกษามีคุณภาพและ มาตรฐานเท่าเทียมกัน แต่รัฐสามารถประกันคุณภาพและมาตรฐานการศึกษาของ สถานศึกษา ให้มีคุณภาพและมาตรฐานไม่ตํ่ากว่ามาตรฐานขั้นตํ่าที่รัฐกําหนด • ภาระของรัฐที่มีต่อ พลเมืองจึงเป็นภาระที่ต้องรับผิดชอบต่อโอกาสและความเสมอภาคทางการศึกษาของคน ทุก กลุ่มให้สามารถเข้าถึงบริการการศึกษาที่ดีมีคุณภาพ ตามศักยภาพและความสามารถ ของแต่ละบุคคล • รัฐในการกํากับนโยบายและแผนการศึกษาให้บรรลุวัตถุประสงค์และเป้ าหมาย ตามยุทธศาสตร์ แนวทาง ภายใต้ แผนงาน/โครงการ/กิจกรรม ที่ส่งผลกระทบต่อการยกระดับ คุณภาพและมาตรฐานการศึกษา การเพิ่มโอกาสและ ความเสมอภาคทางการศึกษา การลด ความแตกต่างในคุณภาพและมาตรฐานการศึกษาระหว่างสถานศึกษา การ เพิ่มประสิทธิภาพ การบริหารและการจัดการ 17
  18. 18. แนวทางการจัดการศึกษา (Means) • สถาบันผลิตครู สถานศึกษา และสมาคมวิชาชีพครู ต้องร่วมมือกันพัฒนาหลักสูตร การจัด การเรียนการสอน ตาม กรอบคุณวุฒิแห่งชาติ เพื่อให้ผู้สําเร็จการศึกษาวิชาชีพครูมีทักษะ ความรู้ความสามารถ และสมรรถนะตาม มาตรฐานวิชาชีพครู ทั้งด้านการพัฒนาหลักสูตร การจัดการเรียนการสอน และการวัดและประเมินผลผู้เรียน มีจิต วิญญาณของความเป็นครู รวมทั้งสามารถจัดการเรียนการสอนให้ผู้เรียนมีคุณลักษณะนิสัย/พฤติกรรมที่พึง ประสงค์ มีทักษะการเรียนรู้ในศตวรรษที่ ๒๑ ทักษะการดํารงชีวิต และมีความเป็นพลเมือง • ระบบการคัดเลือกเข้าศึกษาในวิชาชีพครู ต้องเป็นไปตามหลัก เกณฑ์และคุณสมบัติที่กําหนดเพื่อให้ได้ผู้เรียนที่มี ศักยภาพและความ สามารถตรงตามความต้องการ และมีจิตวิญญาณของความเป็นครู • การสรรหาคัดเลือกและบรรจุครูใหม่ ให้เปลี่ยนสถานะเป็น พนักงานของรัฐ ด้วยระบบสัญญาจ้าง และได้รับ เงินเดือนค่าตอบแทน รวมทั้งสิทธิประโยชน์ไม่ตํ่ากว่าการเป็นข้าราชการ • การดํารงตําแหน่งผู้บริหารสถานศึกษา ให้เปลี่ยนมาเป็นระบบ การสรรหาและคัดเลือกโดยกรรมการสถานศึกษา ซึ่งมีวาระการดํารง ตําแหน่งไม่เกิน ๔ ปี หากพ้นวาระการดํารงตําแหน่งหรือมิได้อยู่ใน ตําแหน่งผู้บริหาร สถานศึกษา ให้กลับมาเป็นครูผู้สอนเช่นเดิม • ระบบการพัฒนาผู้บริหาร ครู คณาจารย์และบุคลากรทาง การศึกษา ต้องเป็นไปตามความต้องการของผู้บริหาร ครู คณาจารย์และ บุคลากรทางการศึกษา และสามารถทดสอบ วัดและประเมินทักษะ ความรู้ ความสามารถ และ สมรรถนะตามมาตรฐานวิชาชีพครู เพื่อยกระดับ สมรรถนะของวิชาชีพครูให้มีคุณภาพและมาตรฐานในระดับที่ สูงขึ้น • เงินเดือน ค่าตอบแทนของผู้บริหาร ครู คณาจารย์และ บุคลากรทางการศึกษา เป็นไปตามผลงานและ ความสามารถ และมีระบบ สัญญาจ้าง รวมทั้งสิทธิประโยชน์ต้องไม่น้อยกว่าที่ข้าราชการได้รับ ซึ่งมิได้ ขึ้นอยู่กับ บัญชีเงินเดือนข้าราชการ 18
  19. 19. • รัฐในการกํากับการศึกษาให้เป็นไปตามเกณฑ์มาตรฐานขั้นตํ่า อาทิ มาตรฐาน หลักสูตร มาตรฐานการจัดการ เรียนการสอน มาตรฐานสถานศึกษา (ได้แก่ ด้านการบริหาร จัดการ การประกันคุณภาพภายใน การประเมิน คุณภาพภายนอก มาตรฐานสมรรถนะวิชาชีพ ของผู้บริหารสถานศึกษา ครู คณาจารย์และบุคลากรทางการ ศึกษา) มาตรฐานการวัดและ ประเมินผล ฯลฯ ภายใต้กฎ ระเบียบ กติกา ข้อบังคับ แนวปฏิบัติ โดยไม่เลือก ปฏิบัติ ระหว่างสถานศึกษาของรัฐ องค์กรปกครองส่วนท้องถิ่น เอกชน สถานประกอบการ มูลนิธิ วัด สมาคม ฯลฯ • ทุกภาคส่วนของสังคม๑๕ ซึ่งเป็นผู้ได้รับประโยชน์ทั้งทางตรง และทางอ้อมจากการได้รับการศึกษาของพลเมือง ต้องมี ส่วนร่วมระดมทุน และร่วมรับภาระค่าใช้จ่ายเพื่อการศึกษา ผ่านการเสียภาษีตามหลัก ความสามารถในการ จ่าย (Ability to Pay) ซึ่งเป็นหน้าที่ของพลเมือง และ การบริจาค รวมทั้งมีส่วนร่วมรับภาระค่าใช้จ่ายตาม อัตราค่าเล่าเรียน ค่าธรรมเนียมการเรียน ค่าบริการหรือสิ่งอํานวยความสะดวกอื่นที่ได้รับ เกินกว่าคุณภาพ มาตรฐานขั้นตํ่าที่รัฐกําหนดตามอัตราที่สถานศึกษาเรียก เก็บ๑๖ ตามหลักประโยชน์ที่ได้รับ (Benefit Principle)๑๗ • สถานศึกษาต้องบริหารและจัดการศึกษาที่แสดงความรับผิดชอบ (Accountability) ต่อคุณภาพและ มาตรฐานของบริการการศึกษาที่ให้แก่ ผู้เรียน • n ทุกภาคส่วนของสังคม๑๕ ซึ่งเป็นผู้ได้รับประโยชน์ทั้งทางตรง และทางอ้อมจากการได้รับการศึกษาของพลเมือง ต้องมี ส่วนร่วมระดมทุน และร่วมรับภาระค่าใช้จ่ายเพื่อการศึกษา ผ่านการเสียภาษีตามหลัก ความสามารถในการ จ่าย (Ability to Pay) ซึ่งเป็นหน้าที่ของพลเมือง และ การบริจาค รวมทั้งมีส่วนร่วมรับภาระค่าใช้จ่ายตาม อัตราค่าเล่าเรียน ค่าธรรมเนียมการเรียน ค่าบริการหรือสิ่งอํานวยความสะดวกอื่นที่ได้รับ เกินกว่าคุณภาพ มาตรฐานขั้นตํ่าที่รัฐกําหนดตามอัตราที่สถานศึกษาเรียก เก็บ๑๖ ตามหลักประโยชน์ที่ได้รับ (Benefit Principle)๑๗ • สถานศึกษาต้องบริหารและจัดการศึกษาที่แสดงความรับผิดชอบ (Accountability) ต่อคุณภาพและ มาตรฐานของบริการการศึกษาที่ให้แก่ ผู้เรียน ทั้งการศึกษาในระบบ การศึกษานอกระบบ และการศึกษาตาม อัธยาศัย (ไม่ตํ่ากว่ามาตรฐานขั้นตํ่าที่รัฐกําหนด)๑๘ • ความยั่งยืนและการดํารงอยู่ของสถานศึกษาต้องเป็นการแข่งขันเพื่อให้ได้มาซึ่งคุณภาพ มาตรฐาน ประสิทธิภาพและ ประสิทธิผล ภายใต้กลไกตลาดที่กํากับของรัฐ (Regulated Market) 19
  20. 20. THAILAND K-12 EDUCATION SYSTEM PROGRESS AND FAILURE OECD : Governing Complex Education Systems 20 Lessons Learned
  21. 21. Our K-12 Education System – dynamic interrelations of education elements that affect outcomes of the system - Tri-level within the System – Need seamless integration System Governance Philosophy, Policy and Plan District Management & Schools Structure Principals and School Management Teachers Teaching and LearningStudents Learning Assessment Teacher Education National Regional Local Curriculum, Standard and Learning Materials Other System Assessments Government– Politics Society– Communities Exhibit 1 21Sutham , From “Thailand K-12 Education System: Progress and Failure” 2012
  22. 22. Understanding education system dynamics forms a foundation for insight into system behaviours and outcomes – a necessary condition for development Philosophy, Policy and Plan System Governance Teacher Education In- service Teachers Government - Politics Society - Communities Curriculum, Standard and Learning Materials Teaching and Learning Principals and School Management District Management & Schools Structure Students Assessments Other External Systems 22Sutham , From “Thailand K-12 Education System: Progress and Failure” 2012
  23. 23. NOTES From “Thailand K-12 Education System: Progress and Failure” I. Progress and Failure 2. The first and foremost failure is in planning processes 1. No deep analyses, no assessment of previous plans and policies, no position papers for extensive discussion and consultation – short brainstorming is often a norm 2. Participatory planning process is often a process whereby a lot of people come together to hear what a few people have to say – number become meaningless 3. Policy research is hard to find leading to little or no policy learning 3. Execution of national plan is simply weak and does not work 1. Such a complex undertaking cannot be managed by committees through manuals 2. Ad hoc training is not adequate to go forward 3. Communications cannot be accomplished through a large scale seminar 4. Current Organization Structure does not help either 1. Level of unity in commitment, co-ordination and collaboration is low 2. A key question is who is leading among the five commissions 3. Current Centralized-decentralization does not work – weak district capacities, wide range of school management capacities – element of centralized control is still embedded in district and school levels. Sutham , NOTES From “Thailand K-12 Education System: Progress and Failure” 2013 23
  24. 24. 8. Teachers and Teacher Education 1. Teacher education system is weak in terms of supply and demand planning and in quality – QA does not work 2. Teacher profession is attractive more to security and compensation than professionalism of this profession – weak licensure system 3. Academic ranking with salary top-up has not led to improved student learning outcomes – another unintended consequences – a very serious one 4. Missing link in education research and policy making – education research needs to ramp up 9. Assessments 1. Not all key areas of education system have received proper assessments. 2. Formative evaluation needs help. 3. Meaning of national tests and usages – need further elaboration NOTES From “Thailand K-12 Education System: Progress and Failure” I. Progress and Failure Sutham , NOTES From “Thailand K-12 Education System: Progress and Failure” 2013 24
  25. 25. 10. Our K-12 Education System is a complex social system, but it has been approached as a simple linear system of simple causality with simple ad hoc or fragmented policies. 1. Education System is a complex social system where elements are interacting and are interdependent. It is multi-level, multi-scale and multi-dimensional. 2. It is massive and diverse. Centralized decentralization will not work in such a complex system 3. Complex system evolves and learns. All need to be involved and all need to evolve together 4. Wrong approach gives undesirable results (as we have been getting for the last few decades) 11. We need to rethink about 1. National Education Philosophy and its realization. 2. Planning and implementation processes. 3. Roles of Institutions and institution development 4. Complexity of undertaking and how to evolve 5. Interdependencies among elements in the system – particularly human elements 6. Roles of society, communities and especially media 7. How all can work together NOTES From “Thailand K-12 Education System: Progress and Failure” II Reality and Lessons Learned Sutham , NOTES From “Thailand K-12 Education System: Progress and Failure” 2013 25
  26. 26. 12. Further guiding principles 1. Capacity Building is a foundation. Capacity Building needs to be at all levels. Leadership and adaptive capacity development are essential. 2. Knowledge and support are keys. Knowledge needs to be created through research. All stakeholders can be sources/parts of knowledge system. Global knowledge is a critical source. 3. Local development is the key and autonomy needs to be encouraged and supported. 4. Assessment system is essential where it can provide effective feedback at appropriate time and place throughout the system Keys in planning and policies 5. A system of coherent and aligned policies is necessary to aid system evolution. 6. How intervention policies are implemented is critical to their success. NOTES From “Thailand K-12 Education System: Progress and Failure” II Reality and Lessons Learned 26 Sutham , NOTES From “Thailand K-12 Education System: Progress and Failure” 2013
  27. 27. OECD Governing Complex Education Systems GCES Main Findings • There is no one right system of governance. Rather than focusing on structures it is more fruitful to focus on processes. • Effective governance works through building capacity, open dialogue, and stakeholder involvement. • Governance is a balancing act between accountability and trust, innovation and risk-avoidance, consensus building and making difficult choices • The central level remains very important (even in decentralized systems) in triggering and steering education reform through strategic vision and clear guidelines and feedback. • There are systemic weaknesses in capacity throughout most educational systems which contribute to today’s governance challenges. • Importance of key principles for system governance (not just agreement on where to go, but how to get there). Tracey Burns , OECD Governing Complex Education Systems 2014

×