Bringing them online: Using design research to identify online opportunities

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Presented at Oz-IA 2009, this presentation discusses the use of user research to inform the design of SuperRacing, a cross website horse racing content vertical.

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  • Building the SuperRacing brand to be the most recognised online racing website within the Australian market Providing the greatest depth of quality and editorial content – the most in-depth analysis, comprehensive reporting and valued opinion within racing in Australia Increasing NDM’s market share in terms of unique browsers in the Australian market
  • Literature review Previous research, including our team but also other business units and external parties Among other things, this gave us a basic audience model Competitor review content and functionality across Australian and international Google Trends
  • Individual interviews “ online racing diary” more detail than 1 hour Exercises capture specific information
  • Interview notes Diaries transcribed establish themes Secondary research included Lots discussion and sketching!
  • Horse racing is a social thing Except for hard core betting Key elements are the social process of “turf talk” between friends/family And intellectual challenge part of their lifestyle family connection introduced by older generation, and “knowledge by association”
  • many different sources Many are offline Each has its pros and cons “ competitors” not just media industry multiple sources, no “one stop shop” must try to fit into Rather than “everything to everyone” ecosystem good perspective assess useful
  • amount of information -- overload is a problem Too many races, too many horses, too much data especially more serious limit what they follow Eg weekend only Eg certain tracks/cities only Eg types of content (video of starts)
  • identified opportunities : Realistic needs and wants of the audience The competitive landscape Users’ information ecosystem (ie where they currently get into from) Playing to our strengths (eg expert editorial content) Minimising our weaknesses (eg resources, late market entry) Where website supplement existing, and offline, information sources We could then prioritise the audience (eg primary and secondary personas)
  • Interested in fashion and glamour New to racing, very little knowledge Goes to the races quite often during carnival seasons, for the fashion/party
  • Interested in the social side, but getting more serious about betting and racing Had an interest for a while but relatively little knowledge Relies heavily on tips and advice Learning more about racing all the time Enjoys sports in general
  • It’s part of his social fabric Frequents the local club, pub and TAB (his Saturday ritual) Doesn’t go to the track anymore (too many Princesses!) Highly knowledgeable about horse racing Uses his own knowledge and intuition rather than listening to tips or advice Big sports fan in general Well known as the guru punter
  • High income profession Takes racing, and betting, very seriously He bets big (ego bettor) Experienced, but hasn’t been around as long as John More data focussed; lots of research using all sources Uses a system, rather than intuition Heavy online user Keeps track of his betting and progress
  • explored the needs, actions and use of information sources by users by producing mental models (ala Indi Young) gap analysis requirements prioritisation -- segmented and ranked by persona
  • Where to now? The black hole moment…. We’ve got the insightful research in the bag. There’s lots of business requirements And plenty of editorial requirements So much to digest. The canvas is blank. Where do we start?
  • Stop. Rewind a moment… So as a team we took a deep breath and got all retrospective…
  • Don’t forget from a site design perspective to… How can we meet the user needs identified? How can our site can fit into the existing racing ecosystem? What are the touch points we can address and deliver on?
  • Challenge… Race Card in Print One of the big Challenges: Bringing the Form Guide to the web. Cross referencing between tips, odds and horse form statistics is hard unless you are in the ‘know’. How do we translate this online? There’s no editorial context. Stories appear elsewhere (previous/next page) Another design challenge: ‘Don’t forget! We needed the detail but not the complexity’. ‘Good luck with that. A tough challenge’ - Herald Sun Racing Editor
  • Thinking, Collaborating, Sketching, Thinking Time was spent brainstorming ideas for the website In particular how we could effectively fit into the audience’s ecosystem This was a joint process with both research and design disciplines taking part We delved down into a fair amount of detail for some specific aspects of the possible design solution in response to specific issues raised in the research Visualising the user requirements Visualising the editorial and business requirements We delved down into a fair amount of detail for some specific aspects of the possible design solution in response to specific issues raised in the research For example: The ‘My Race Picks’ idea which allows users to keep a list of bets they might place, similar to a shopping cart on a e-commerce website Contextualising the Race details. Matching statistics with form, editorial, expert opinion and live tweets.
  • From Sketches to Visio Feed sketches and specific user requirements into concept As ideas for possible solutions started to solidify the sketches were transferred into Visio to form ‘conceptual wireframes’ These were used for usability testing and also as a basis for visual design mock-ups
  • Eyetracking wireframes and design mocks To help validate our conceptual design decisions user testing was performed The testing was a very loose/open form of usability testing The emphasis was on exploring how well the concepts worked with real users Both wireframes and visual design mocks were used in the testing Eyetracking was performed to allow for extra depth of analysis for certain aspects of the design For example: Contextualisation of stories > Display Race Meeting name above story link Several iterations of design revisions and testing were undertaken
  • Site map Design Philosophy…The race is the core of the site. Following on from the testing we entered the detailed product design phase Calendar/Race card/Race Details is the core of the site. A different design approach from the normally content driven media sites we produce
  • Wireframes This involved finalising and fleshing out the conceptual deliverables Getting the business to sign off and making them usable from a site production perspective (developers, third parties, designers etc etc) Brings context to the subject by showing related content. For example: Tips, Track Data, Live updates, related expert opinion, stories
  • Detailed Design Based on the detailed wireframes production grade visual designs were produced for all site pages
  • Twitter integration for ‘Trackside Live’ There are a number of innovative elements incorporated into the site design One of these is the use of Twitter for the ‘Trackside live’ functionality Trackside live gives the user real-time coverage from particular racetracks at particular times For example: a major race meeting or a horse trial session It involved commentary from an expert journalist who is in the thick of the action This is invaluable information for many racing enthusiasts (particularly at the more serious end of the spectrum) Journalists currently attend many race meetings but have been unable to easily broadcast their thoughts or observations quickly Using Blackberry devices journalist can now tweet information that is picked up by the website CMS and contextually placed onto the website The processing includes expanding short-hand and turning keywords into contextual links For example: Horse Name links to Horse statistics page, Race number links to Race details page
  • A la prochaine…
  • Bringing them online: Using design research to identify online opportunities

    1. Bringing them online Using design research to identify online opportunities Alun Machin Senior Experience Architect Patrick Kennedy Design Research Lead Oz-IA09 - Friday 2 nd October 2009 Image sourced from www.flickr.com/photos/rogerbarker/2881764517/
    2. Introduction The 5,000 foot view Royal Randwick Racecourse, Sydney - Image courtesy of Google Maps
    3. Introduction And a brief agenda <ul><li>In 2009, NDM aimed to develop a syndicated horse racing vertical across its masthead network that reduces duplication and increases efficiencies </li></ul><ul><li>The vision included </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Building the SuperRacing brand to be the most recognised online racing website within the Australian market </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Providing the greatest depth of quality and editorial content – the most in-depth analysis, comprehensive reporting and valued opinion within racing in Australia </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing NDM’s market share in terms of unique browsers in the Australian market </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The practical outcome of this was a new horse racing ‘section’ that would be shared across the NDM network of websites </li></ul><ul><li>Today we will give a glimpse of the process we followed when undertaking user research and using the findings to design the finished product </li></ul><ul><li>We will then unveil the new SuperRacing website </li></ul>
    4. Overview of methodology The what, how and who <ul><li>Secondary research </li></ul><ul><li>Primary user research </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Conceptualisation </li></ul><ul><li>Testing </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed product design </li></ul><ul><li>Research: Pat and Alun </li></ul><ul><li>Conceptulisation: Alun and Pat </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed EA design: Alun </li></ul><ul><li>Visual design: designer in another team </li></ul>
    5. Secondary research Literature review and competitor review
    6. <ul><li>Secondary research is a very useful foundation on which to begin a design research project </li></ul><ul><li>Literature review </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Previous research from other sources was collated and reviewed for potentially useful findings with regard to the research objectives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Included earlier research conducted by USiT and other NDM business units, but also academic research conducted by external parties </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Among other things, this gave us a basic audience model with which to recruit participants for primary research and later revised and expanded </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Competitor review </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This covered the content and functionality across a wide range of Australian and international racing-related websites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Also included a wider look at online racing activity using tools like Google Trends </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conducted by Alun </li></ul></ul>Secondary research Literature review and competitor review
    7. User research Interviews and diary study
    8. User research Interviews and diary study <ul><li>Our primary research consisted of interviews and a diary study </li></ul><ul><li>Interviews </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interviews with individual participants were conducted </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>10 in-depth interviews were conducted (5 in person and 5 via phone) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Diary study </li></ul><ul><ul><li>After each interview, participants were given an “online racing diary” to use over the course of a week </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This attempted to gain more detail than could be gained during 1 hour of face time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exercises were also set to capture specific information </li></ul></ul>
    9. Analysis Bringing it all together
    10. Analysis Bringing it all together <ul><li>Many notes were taken during interviews </li></ul><ul><li>Diaries were ‘transcribed’ </li></ul><ul><li>A simplified form of grounded theory was used to establish themes </li></ul><ul><li>Secondary research findings were also included in this analysis </li></ul><ul><li>There was also lots of discussion and sketching! </li></ul><ul><li>A few of the themes that came out of the research are discussed on the following slides </li></ul>
    11. Racing is a predominantly social activity User research findings Ascot Racecourse, UK - Image sourced from http://www.flickr.com/photos/russelljsmith/2485323167/
    12. Racing is a predominantly social activity User research findings <ul><li>Horse racing is a social thing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Except for hard core betting addicts that are only concerned about betting and money </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Key elements are the social process of “turf talk” between friends/family </li></ul><ul><li>And the intellectual challenge of using knowledge to pick a winner </li></ul><ul><li>For many people it’s part of their lifestyle, their leisure </li></ul><ul><li>And for almost all of the people we talked to, there was a family connection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>They were introduced to horse racing by parents or an older generation, and thus to a certain extent they had some “knowledge by association” </li></ul></ul>
    13. We are facing a complex existing ecosystem User research findings Horse racing enthusiast Specialist publications TV Newspaper form guide Tipsters Racetrack Friends and family Betting agency Specialist websites Radio ?
    14. We are facing a complex existing ecosystem User research findings <ul><li>There are many different sources of information available to punters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Newspapers, websites, TV, radio, friends and family </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>There is also a lot of tacit knowledge about racing; intuition and gut feel that is built up over years </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Not surprisingly, many sources of information are offline </li></ul><ul><li>Each medium, or source of information, has its pros and cons </li></ul><ul><li>So our “competitors” lie not just within the traditional media industry </li></ul><ul><li>They use multiple sources, there is no such thing as a “one stop shop” </li></ul><ul><li>This ecosystem of aggregated information sources is something we must try to fit into </li></ul><ul><li>Rather than thinking we can sweep the field and be everything to everyone </li></ul>
    15. We are facing a complex existing ecosystem User research findings <ul><li>The audience’s ecosystem is a good perspective from which to assess the usefulness or appropriateness of strategy and design </li></ul><ul><li>When mapping out the ecosystem we need to answer questions such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Where do they currently get information? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who they trust? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who would they think to get info from? (ie brand perception) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How can we supplement or compliment other sources? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What things work online? What doesn’t make sense to be online? </li></ul></ul>
    16. Information overload is a problem There are over 2,600 race meetings comprising over 19,500 races conducted at over 350 race tracks in Australia each year, making Australia the second largest thoroughbred industry in the world based on the number of races. User research findings - Source: Racing Information Services Australia (RISA)
    17. Information overload is a problem User research findings <ul><li>With the amount of information about racing that is available, information overload is a problem </li></ul><ul><li>Too many races, too many horses, too much data </li></ul><ul><li>This is especially the case for the more serious racing enthusiasts </li></ul><ul><li>Punters have to limit what they follow, to do so with any success </li></ul><ul><li>This might mean only following/betting weekend races </li></ul><ul><li>Or it might mean only following certain tracks/cities </li></ul><ul><li>And the types of content they use is impacted </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Lots of things would be great to have [eg video of last starts] but it comes down to how much time do you have to study” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Short interviews they have on Racenet TV are good, with trainers but they are short, about 30 seconds (unless it’s a well known trainer like Gai Waterhouse)” </li></ul></ul>
    18. Audience modeling Segmentation and identifying opportunities The Princess The Apprentice Life-long Punter The Serious Bettor
    19. Audience modeling Segmentation and identifying opportunities <ul><li>Based on both secondary and primary user research, an audience model was developed that segmented the potential audience into four </li></ul><ul><li>We then identified areas of opportunity for SuperRacing based on </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Realistic needs and wants of the audience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The competitive landscape </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Users’ information ecosystem (ie where they currently get into from) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What the audience would realistically come to us for (in terms of information) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Playing to our strengths (eg expert editorial content) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Minimising our weaknesses (eg resources, late market entry) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In particular we looked for where we could use a website to supplement existing, and offline, information sources </li></ul><ul><li>We could then prioritise the audience (eg primary and secondary personas) </li></ul>
    20. Say hi to Sally The Princess “ I missed the first race, because I couldn’t decide what to wear!” SALLY
    21. v2.1 Background image on previous slide sourced from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/russelljsmith/2486129826/ <ul><li>Sally is a racing “Princess” </li></ul><ul><li>Young professional </li></ul><ul><li>Interested in fashion and glamour </li></ul><ul><li>Mainstream publications (papers and mags) are her entry point to racing </li></ul><ul><li>New to racing, very little knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Goes to the races quite often during carnival seasons, for the fashion/party </li></ul><ul><li>Goes into sweeps for Melbourne Cup </li></ul><ul><li>Does not go to club/pub/TAB to enjoy racing </li></ul><ul><li>Uses internet at work and a fair bit for social purposes </li></ul><ul><li>Generally not a sports fan </li></ul>Say hi to Sally The Princess
    22. Dave says g’day The Apprentice “ I try to know the form, but sometimes I just take a punt!” DAVE
    23. v2.0 Background images on previous slide sourced from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/boboroshi/13142954/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/neeta_lind/2191150047/ <ul><li>Dave is a racing “Apprentice” </li></ul><ul><li>Interested in the social side, but getting more serious about betting and racing </li></ul><ul><li>Had an interest for a while but relatively little knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Not always sure what he’s reading (with regard to racing jargon and data) </li></ul><ul><li>Relies heavily on tips and advice </li></ul><ul><li>Reads up on the form, but can also bet on impulse </li></ul><ul><li>Learning more about racing all the time </li></ul><ul><li>Wants to get better at picking winners </li></ul><ul><li>Aspires to be John (or maybe Carl) </li></ul><ul><li>Uses the internet quite a bit </li></ul><ul><li>Enjoys sports in general </li></ul>Dave says g’day The Apprentice
    24. This is John The Life-Long Punter “ Saturday racing is my relaxation; a few drinks and a bet” JOHN
    25. v2.0 Background image on previous slide sourced from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/charliebrewer/58806103/ <ul><li>John is a long-time racing follower </li></ul><ul><li>Grew up with it, there’s a family connection </li></ul><ul><li>It’s part of his social fabric </li></ul><ul><li>Frequents the local club, pub and TAB (his Saturday ritual) </li></ul><ul><li>Doesn’t go to the track anymore (too many Princesses!) </li></ul><ul><li>Highly knowledgeable about horse racing </li></ul><ul><li>Uses his own knowledge and intuition rather than listening to tips or advice </li></ul><ul><li>Big sports fan in general </li></ul><ul><li>Mainly uses paper form guide and the TV at TAB </li></ul><ul><li>Doesn’t bet online but will use the internet for info </li></ul><ul><li>Well known as the guru punter </li></ul>This is John The Life-Long Punter
    26. Meet Carl The Serious Bettor “ If I’m chasing I keep going till I get up, I don’t like to lose” CARL
    27. v2.0 Background image on previous slide sourced from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tedkerwin/2543014596/ <ul><li>Carl is a serious racing bettor </li></ul><ul><li>High income profession </li></ul><ul><li>Takes racing, and betting, very seriously </li></ul><ul><li>He bets big (ego bettor) </li></ul><ul><li>Experienced, but hasn’t been around as long as John </li></ul><ul><li>More data focussed; lots of research using all sources </li></ul><ul><li>Uses a system, rather than intuition </li></ul><ul><li>Heavy online user </li></ul><ul><li>May go to the track occasionally (bit of a flirt and flaunt) </li></ul><ul><li>Invests in horses (including syndicates) </li></ul><ul><li>Bets most weekends </li></ul><ul><li>Keeps track of his betting and progress </li></ul>Meet Carl The Serious Bettor
    28. Further analysis Mental models and requirements ranking
    29. Further analysis Mental models and requirements specification <ul><li>We further explored the needs, actions and use of information sources by users by producing mental models (ala Indi Young) for each persona </li></ul><ul><li>These are an excellent way to pull together the knowledge we gained about the audience but also gives the business a way of assessing how the needs are being met (ie ‘gap analysis’ below the line) </li></ul><ul><li>Gap analysis and requirements prioritisation was also performed using a requirements list, segmented and ranked by persona </li></ul><ul><li>This list of requirements referred back to a formal requirements specification containing business, technical and project management requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Note: some detail has been obscured to protect IP </li></ul>
    30. Conceptualisation Where to now? Galaxy 3C 305 - located about 600 million light years away from Earth Image Credits: X-ray: NASA/CXC/CfA/F. Massaro et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI/C.P. O'Dea et al.; Radio: NSF/VLA/CfA/F. Massaro, E. Liuzzo, A. Bonafede et al.
    31. Conceptualisation Where to now? <ul><li>The black hole moment…. </li></ul><ul><li>We’ve got the insightful research in the bag </li></ul><ul><li>There’s lots of business requirements </li></ul><ul><li>And plenty of editorial requirements </li></ul><ul><li>So much to digest </li></ul><ul><li>The canvas is blank </li></ul><ul><li>Where do we start? </li></ul>
    32. Conceptualisation Stop. Rewind a moment… image sourced from: www.flickr.com/photos/mrdannywilliams/2998437883/
    33. Conceptualisation Stop. Rewind a moment… <ul><li>So as a team we took a deep breath and got all retrospective… </li></ul>
    34. Conceptualisation Don’t forget…
    35. Conceptualisation Don’t forget… <ul><li>Don’t forget from a site design perspective to ask… </li></ul><ul><li>How can we meet the user needs identified? </li></ul><ul><li>How can our site can fit into the existing racing ecosystem? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the touch points we can address and deliver on? </li></ul>
    36. Conceptualisation Challenge… Race Card in Print…
    37. Conceptualisation Challenge… Race Card in Print… <ul><li>One of the big Challenges: Bringing the Form Guide to the web </li></ul><ul><li>Cross referencing between tips, odds and horse form statistics is hard unless you are in the ‘know’ </li></ul><ul><li>How do we translate this online? </li></ul><ul><li>There’s no editorial context. Stories appear elsewhere (previous/next page) </li></ul><ul><li>Another design challenge: ‘Don’t forget! We needed the detail but not the complexity’ </li></ul><ul><li>“ Good luck with that. A tough challenge” – key stakeholder </li></ul>
    38. Conceptualisation Thinking, collaborating, sketching, thinking…
    39. Conceptualisation Thinking, collaborating, sketching, thinking… <ul><li>Time was spent brainstorming ideas for the website </li></ul><ul><li>In particular how we could effectively fit into the audience’s ecosystem </li></ul><ul><li>This was a joint process with both research and design disciplines taking part </li></ul><ul><li>Visualising the user requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Visualising the editorial and business requirements </li></ul><ul><li>We delved down into a fair amount of detail for some specific aspects of the possible design solution in response to specific issues raised in the research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: The ‘My Race Picks’ idea which allows users to keep a list of bets they might place, similar to a shopping cart on a e-commerce website </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Contextualising the Race details. Matching statistics with form, editorial, expert opinion and live tweets </li></ul>
    40. Conceptualisation From sketches to Visio
    41. Concept wireframes From sketches to Visio <ul><li>Feed sketches and specific user requirements into concept </li></ul><ul><li>As ideas for possible solutions started to solidify the sketches were transferred into Visio to form ‘conceptual wireframes’ </li></ul><ul><li>These were used for usability testing and also as a basis for visual design mock-ups </li></ul>
    42. Concept testing Eyetracking wireframes and design mocks
    43. Concept testing Eyetracking wireframes and design mocks <ul><li>To help validate our conceptual design decisions user testing was performed </li></ul><ul><li>The testing was a very loose/open form of usability testing </li></ul><ul><li>The emphasis was on exploring how well the concepts worked with real users </li></ul><ul><li>Both wireframes and visual design mocks were used in the testing </li></ul><ul><li>Eyetracking was performed to allow for extra depth of analysis for certain aspects of the design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: Contextualisation of stories > Display Race Meeting name above story link </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Several iterations of design revisions and testing were undertaken </li></ul>
    44. Detailed design Site map
    45. Detailed design Site map <ul><li>Following on from the testing we entered the detailed product design phase </li></ul><ul><li>Calendar/Race card/Race Details is the core of the site (circled in red) </li></ul><ul><li>A different design approach from the normally content driven media sites we produce </li></ul>
    46. Detailed design Wireframes
    47. Detailed design Wireframes <ul><li>This involved finalising and fleshing out the conceptual deliverables </li></ul><ul><li>Getting the business to sign off and making them usable from a site production perspective (developers, third parties, designers etc etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Brings context to the subject by showing related content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For example: Tips, Track Data, Live updates, related expert opinion, stories </li></ul></ul>
    48. Detailed design Visual design
    49. Detailed design Visual design <ul><li>Based on the detailed wireframes production grade visual designs were produced for all site pages </li></ul>
    50. Innovations Twitter integration for ‘Trackside Live’ Journalist at racetrack Backend processing
    51. Innovations Twitter integration for ‘Trackside Live’ <ul><li>There are a number of innovative elements incorporated into the design </li></ul><ul><li>One of these is the use of Twitter for the “trackside live” functionality </li></ul><ul><li>Trackside live gives the user real-time coverage from particular racetracks at particular times </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Eg: a major race meeting or a horse trial session </li></ul></ul><ul><li>It involves commentary from an expert journalist who is in the thick of the action </li></ul><ul><li>This is invaluable information for many racing enthusiasts (particularly at the more serious end of the spectrum) </li></ul><ul><li>Journalists currently attend many race meetings but have been unable to easily broadcast their commentary </li></ul><ul><li>Using Blackberry devices, journalists can now Tweet information that is then picked up by the website CMS, processed and contextually placed on the website </li></ul><ul><li>The processing includes expanding short-hand and turning keywords into contextual links </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Eg: Horse Name links to Horse statistics page, Race number links to Race details page </li></ul></ul>
    52. The finished product http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/racing/
    53. Any questions? Patrick Kennedy [email_address] @patrickkennedy Alun Machin [email_address] @alunmac (note these slides will be placed on slideshare: www.slideshare.net/PatrickKennedy/ ) Sam Houston Racetrack, Texas - Image sourced from http://www.flickr.com/photos/eschipul/2636452277/
    54. About Patrick Kennedy <ul><li>Patrick Kennedy is Design Research Lead at News Digital Media, where he specialises in understanding audiences and their needs through user research, and using that knowledge to inform strategy and the design of online experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Patrick has over ten years experience in web design, information architecture and user experience design, and has worked with many different types of organisations in a variety of industries, both in Australia and the UK, assisting them with enhancing their websites and other information systems </li></ul><ul><li>Patrick blogs at www.gurtle.com/ppov/ and you can find him on twitter as @PatrickKennedy </li></ul>
    55. About Alun Machin <ul><li>Alun Machin is a Senior Experience Architect at News Digital Media where he specialises in creating engaging online presences for the company’s plethora of websites </li></ul><ul><li>Alun has well over a decade of experience in interaction design and has worked with a wide variety of organisations both in Australia and Europe </li></ul><ul><li>He’s particularly excited about the challenge of designing shared experience spaces with delivery through multiple devices including mobile </li></ul><ul><li>As well as being a passionate advocate of user-centered product design Alun remains a hopeless devotee of Liverpool Football Club and enjoys playing records very loudly </li></ul><ul><li>You can find Alun on twitter as @alunmac </li></ul>
    56. About News Digital Media <ul><li>News Digital Media ( www.newsdigitalmedia.com.au ) is one of Australia’s largest and most innovative digital media publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Its network includes news.com.au , truelocal.com.au , careerone.com.au , carsguide.com.au , moshtix.com.au and the websites for News Limited’s newspapers including The Australian, The Daily Telegraph, Herald Sun, The Courier Mail and The Advertiser </li></ul><ul><li>News Digital Media is the online division of News Corporation’s Australian subsidiary News Limited </li></ul><ul><li>The User Standards and Innovative Technology (USiT) team provides UX, IA and user research expertise to the rest of the NDM and News Limited network </li></ul>

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