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DWP 388 v3

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DWP 388 v3

  1. 1. NEWS ADM’s Defence Week Premium Edition This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publisher. DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 1 DEFENCE WEEK ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS Navantia selected to build Navy’s replenishment ships Nigel Pittaway | Melbourne News that Spanish Shipbuilder Navantia has been selected as the preferred tenderer to build two large replenishment vessels in Spain was leaked to the media last week and the resulting backlash has forced Defence Minister Marise Payne to defend the decision before she even formally announced it. Under Project Sea 1654 Phase 2, Navantia will build two 19,800-tonne vessels based on the Spanish Navy’s Cantabria class ships at a total project cost, according to the newly-released Defence Integrated Investment Program, of between one and two billion dollars. Negotiations between the Commonwealth and Navantia will now take place, with Second Pass likely in mid-2016. The media reports triggered an outcry of protests from unions, industry, the Federal Opposition and independent Senator Nick Xenophon, that the vessels would not be built in Australian (more particularly, South Australian) shipyards, with the latter describing the government’s decision as a ‘kick in the guts’ for Australian workers. The Abbott government had announced a limited tender between Navantia and South Korea’s Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME), which was pitching a design based upon the Aegir-class AOR, back in 2014. At the time the government said that the ships would be fabricated in overseas shipyards due to a perceived lack of capacity in Australian facilities. Therefore the leaked announcement came as no surprise to anybody, but ADM suspects the program has been used as an expedient political football in what is after all an election year. IN THIS ISSUE Navantia selected to build Navy’s replenishment ships�������������������������������������������1 The RAAF gets its teeth into multi-domain integration������������������������������������������������2 Dassault eyes VIP fleet replacement���������������������������3 Air Power for the win: Williams Foundation fellow�����5 Doubling up on Long Range Precision Fires���������������6 UUV missions without all the fuss���������������������������������8 Homegrown software developer boosted by Siemens Venture Capital���������������������������9 Forthcoming Events�������������������������������������������������������11 CONTACT DETAILS EDITOR Katherine Ziesing T: 0419 014 308 katherineziesing@yaffa.com.au ONLINE EDITOR Patrick Durrant T: 02 9213 8249 patrickdurrant@yaffa.com.au PUBLISHER Judy Hinz T: 07 3348 6966 judyhinz@yaffa.com.au CONTRIBUTORS Nigel Pittaway M: 0418596131 nigelp@iprimus.com.au STUDIO MANAGER Lauren Esdaile laurenesdaile@yaffa.com.au SUBSCRIPTIONS Martin Phillpott Toll Free 1800 807 760 martinphillpott@yaffa.com.au PUBLISHED BY Yaffa Media Pty Ltd 17-21 Bellevue Street, Surry Hills NSW 2010 T: 02 9281 2333 www.greatmagazines.com.au ADM CANBERRA OFFICE Tel 02 6203 9535 PO Box 4783, Kingston ACT 2604 ADM BRISBANE OFFICE T: 07 3348 6966 PO Box 9165, Wynnum Plaza Qld 4178 www.australiandefence.com.au SUBSCRIPTIONS GREATMAGAZINES.COM.AU CALL 1800 807 760 EMAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS@YAFFA.COM.AU Copyright © 2016 All material appearing in ADM is copyright. Reproduction in whole or in part is not permitted without permission in writing from the publisher. The publishers accept sole responsibility for the contents of this publication, which may in no way be taken to represent the views of the Department of Defence, the Australian Defence Force or any other agency of the Commonwealth of Australia. CONTACT DETAILS Destined to become a familiar silhouette on the horizon – Navantia’s Cantabria in service with the Armada. ©DEFENCE
  2. 2. ADM’s Defence Week Premium Edition This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publisher. www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 2 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS Forcedtodefendthedecisioneventhoughshehadnotmadeanannouncement, Minister Payne said that a new ship lift, higher capacity cranes and a new wharf at the ASC facility in Adelaide would have to be built if the ships were to be constructed here. “None of that can actually happen before the third Air Warfare Destroyer is completed and has undergone testing, so those infrastructure upgrades couldn’t have started before 2020,” she said. ADM Comment: This would seem to be another example of the Minister’s office being caught flat-footed by news of Australian Defence contracts emanating from overseas and in this instance at least, it has played into the hands of the government’s political opponents. The RAAF gets its teeth into multi-domain integration Katherine Ziesing | Canberra Speaking at the 2016 Air Power Conference, Minster for Defence Senator Marise Payne admitted that the Air Force is “at the centre of a technologically enhanced ADF”. She also pointed out that the RAAF is going well with its diversity and gender programs, with females making up 18.5 per cent of its workforce and the service on track to meet its 25 per cent target by 2023. Chief of Air Force Air Marshal Leo Davies said that he was not concerned about the platforms, but rather how they would work together both in the RAAF and wider ADF, echoing the multi-domain focus of the event. As outlined by the Air Power Development Centre’s Dr Sanu Kainikara, this multi-domain approach is not about abolishing the individual services or their journey to the professional mastery of their individual skills. “Multi-domain integration is an idea that creates the potential for the integrationofcapabilitiesresidentineachdomainintoaflexiblerecognisable This could be a sight in the RAN a few years from now – Cantabria refuels Armada ships including an FFG-7 and LHD Juan Carlos I. ©ARMADAESPAŃOLA. “The resulting backlash has forced Defence Minister Marise Payne to defend the decision before she even formally announced it.” AusDefMag FOLLOW ADM ON FACEBOOK
  3. 3. ADM’s Defence Week Premium Edition This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publisher. www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 3 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS whole in such a way as to ensure that the end capability is more than the sum of its parts, with the guarantee that the force design is tailorable to context.” When questioned by ADM about the future mix of Triton, P-8s and G550s, AIRMSHL Davies said concurrency was the biggest driver as the mix will “allow greater ability to perform in multiple operations in multiple places”. He admitted that the skills he had while in this part of the RAAF (he initially flew P3-B/Cs early in his career) have changed from a maritime focus to a land based focus thanks to operational needs. The new mix will allow operators to be proficient across both domains as needed by the RAAF, wider ADF and the needs of government. The recent focus on Freedom of Navigation exercises was also a common theme at the event. “There is a lot more we can do to understand our region,” AIRMSHL Davies said. “How do we retain sovereignty over our defence but also share data and have an appreciation of what is happening in our region?” He is happy with the range of formal and informal links between Australia and China and also with other regional militaries. This event saw chiefs of air forces or their representatives from 25 nations, with over 1000 delegates in the room. Dassault eyes VIP fleet replacement Nigel Pittaway | Singapore Outside the Defence White Paper and Integrated Investment Plan, the replacement of the RAAF’s Special Purpose Aircraft (SPA) fleet is also to be decided this year. A Commonwealth Request for Proposal (RFP) for the selection of a Managing Contractor closed on February 19, with optional Request for Tender (RFT) quality data to be submitted by November 1. The managing contractor is tasked with providing an ‘innovative’ solution to the SPA requirements and is likely to select a mix of platforms to fulfil those requirements. Winning second prize of the 2016 Art Prize, presented at the 2016 Airpower Conference, was “Boeing C-17A Globemaster III” by Drew Harrison, Global Outreach. ©DEFENCE adm-australian- defence-magazine FOLLOW ADM ON LINKED IN “There is a lot more we can do to understand our region,”
  4. 4. ADM’s Defence Week Premium Edition This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publisher. www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 4 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS A shortlist of two or three candidates is expected in the May timeframe, with the announcement of a preferred tenderer due around October. Speaking at the 2016 Singapore Airshow in February, Dassault Falcon’s president for Asia-Pacific, Jean Michel Jacob, revealed that Dassault is in discussion with a number of potential managing contractors for a range of its executive jets, including its flagship 8X. The Falcon 8X is a long-range, three-engine business jet, capable of carrying 12-16 passengers over 6450 nautical miles (11,945 km) without the need to refuel. Dassault claims a total cost of ownership of between 20 and 35 per cent lower than its two nearest competitors, predicting savings of up to US$5 million (A$6.7 million) over six years. The aircraft is currently in the final stages of its certification process which is due to be completed at by the end of June this year, ahead of first delivery to a customer the following month. Proving flights will be conducted later this month under real world conditions, including a Singapore-London non-stop flight. Jacob said that the 8X development is on-track and is performing better than predicted in terms of performance and reliability. “We are interested in renewing our relationship with the Air Force (RAAF) with the 8X and I can say that it’s a great aircraft and doing better than it was promised to do,” he said. ADM understands that a mix of aircraft will be selected, roughly mirroring the current Boeing 737-BBJ/Bombardier CL604 Challenger fleet and is likely also to include a VIP interior in one or both of the new Airbus KC-30A multi-role tanker transports (MRTT) undergoing conversion in Spain. Airfield performance will be an important factor in the selection of at least the smaller aircraft, as it will be required to operate into and out of a large number of smaller domestic and regional airstrips. Dassault said that it is also proposing its smaller Falcon 900LX and 2000LXS business jets. The current SPA lease is set to expire in 2017 but ADM understands there is provision in the contract for two one-year extensions, meaning the existing fleet could be replaced anywhere between 2017 and 2019. Dassault’s flagship 8X executive jet is outperforming expectations. ©DASSAULT AusDefMag FOLLOW ADM ON FACEBOOK “[The 8X] is a great aircraft and doing better than it was promised to do.”
  5. 5. ADM’s Defence Week Premium Edition This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publisher. www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 5 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS Jacob said that Dassault could supply aircraft, including the 8X, to a managing contractor by the 2017 deadline if required. “We are light enough to go to most places, our aircraft also have excellent ‘hot and high performance, which will allow us to get into airfields that the previous aircraft could not do,” he said. Air Power for the win: Williams Foundation Fellow Katherine Ziesing | Canberra Sir Richard Williams Foundation Fellow and noted military scholar Dr Al Stephens set the tone on day one of the Air Power conference this week with the academic version of throwing down the gauntlet to counter insurgency strategies, referring to them as ‘intellectually unsound’. “Despite clear and continual evidence that we win in the air and we lose on the ground, for half a century, the West has repeatedly tried, and failed, to conduct land-centric campaigns based on the intellectually unsustainable theory of counter-insurgency warfare. We should be asking why senior military commanders, including Australia’s, continued for so long to tell ingenuous politicians that they could fight and win wars ‘amongst the people’.” Dr Stephens went through a number of conflicts where air power has been the defining strategic element in winning or achieving the desired outcomes of commanders both in Australia and in overseas scenarios. “With due allowance for detail, much the same pattern has been apparent in Western-led campaigns. That is, brief, overwhelmingly successful air campaigns have been followed by protracted, disastrous land campaigns.” He was also eloquent about the need for leading edge technology and the role that it plays in both how assets are used and the way air power is thought of as both a single service capability and as part of a larger military strategy. Dr Alan Stephens, from the Williams Foundation giving a keynote address on Strategy and Joint Warfare. ©DEFENCE @austdefence FOLLOW ADM ON TWITTER
  6. 6. ADM’s Defence Week Premium Edition This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publisher. www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 6 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS “Against sometimes vehement opposition from the Defence establishment, the Air Force managed to acquire the F-111, the 707 tanker, Jindalee over-the- horizon radar, and precision weapons. These were capabilities that challenged the prevailing mindset, suggesting a defence posture based on information dominance, precision, strategic reach, and national independence. “In more recent times the linkage between technology and strategy has been similarly expressed through the acquisition of Growlers, KC-30s, P-8s, Tritons, Wedgetails, F-35s, C-17s, G550s, and so on. In combination, those are the kinds of capabilities that support the full spectrum of 21st century strategies, from the containment of terrorism at one end to regional self-defence, coercion and compellence at the other. “But while advanced air forces have performed admirably in managing to assemble the hardware, software, and people needed to apply those strategies, they’ve been less successful in explaining their merits. “There is a general community awareness of land warfare, not least through constant exposure to 20th century slogans such as ‘boots on the ground’, ‘win hearts and minds’, and the ‘three-block war’. In Australia, those kinds of slogans carry even more populist appeal, and serve as some kind of dimly-perceived strategic belief system, because of their connection to the national obsession with the legend of Anzac and the myth of the digger,” Stephens said to the crowd. Parts of his argument that land forces still had an important role to play were questioned by the Team Jericho ‘twins’ Group Captains Rob Chipman and Jake Campbell. Acting head of Capability Development Group AVM Mel Hupfield also commented that there were probably some ‘bruised green egos in the room’ after the presentation. ADMComment:TheuseofairpowerintheMiddleEasthasbeenunderpinned by a small footprint COIN strategy put in place by a Coalition but mainly carried out by local forces. The long-term success of this approach has yet to be seen but the era of air power as a key discriminator cannot be underestimated. There is also an argument that an Air Force brings a different mindset to the game, compared to Army or Navy. This different mindset was brought sharply into focus in the small sample of white, blue and green uniforms at the air power conference this week. When various Air Force FEG representatives outlined their successes or wins and the impact of Plan Jericho on the way they did business, a group of green behind me muttered between themselves, “They’re doing their jobs – why is that so special?”. That, right there, sums up both services in a nutshell. Doubling up on Long Range Precision Fires Raytheon is developing a long-range missile that will allow the US Army to field twice as many missiles on its existing launch vehicles. This includes the M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS), which the US Marine Corps showed off during Exercise Talisman Sabre recently. www.australiandefence.com.au 1. Japan ups the charm – Soryu sub to exercise with Navy 2. A boost to defence industry capability 3. Navantia formally offers Cantabria design for Navy fleet oilers 4. Collins extended as Govt refuses to be rushed on future subs 5. SM-6 pulls off hat-trick with ASuW capability MOST READ ONLINE THIS WEEK “[The F-111, the 707 tanker, and Jindalee over- the-horizon radar] were capabilities that challenged the prevailing mindset.”
  7. 7. ADM’s Defence Week Premium Edition This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publisher. www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 7 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS A thinner version of the rockets that make up the Multiple Launch Rocket System Family of Munitions (MFOM), it will fire two missiles from a single weapons pod, delivering cost savings. The new missile will also have a range up to 500 kilometres, greater destructive power and a better guidance system than the current weapon. “We’re looking to replace a design originally from the 1980s,” said Greg Haynes, a Raytheon manager leading the company’s campaign for a new long- range weapon. “Missile technology has come a long way.” The ability to fit two Long-Range Precision Fires missiles in an existing launcher is a significant leap over existing tactical missiles. “Since most of these were produced in the late ‘90s, you run into what we call ‘end of shelf life,’ where the motors and such are no longer reliable,” said former US Army colonel John Weinzettle, now a program manager in Raytheon’s Advanced Missile Systems business. An upgrade becomes even more urgent considering how quickly threats are evolving around the world. “Adversaries are already equipped with long-range weapons that could inflict substantial damage at distances beyond the Army’s striking power,” Weinzettle said. Raytheon’s new long-range weapon will engage targets at approximately 500 kilometres. LRPF is primarily meant to attack fixed ground locations, like helicopter staging areas or hardened bunkers. Because current missiles have restrictions in size, payload effectiveness and range, a simple life-extension program cannot address long-term threats, according to Raytheon. Marine infantry veteran Allen Horman, now a business development manager in Raytheon Advanced Missile Systems, explained that life extension doesn’t add any more capability to the existing inventory. “You are still stuck with the larger round and you still have single loadouts,” Horman said. “So the cost to go to a new missile and a new program to double the loadout is significantly cheaper than what people traditionally say about new starts.” A United States Marine Corps High Mobility Artillery Rocket System at the Bradshaw Field Training Area in the Northern Territory during Exercise Talisman Sabre 2015. ©DEFENCE “Missile technology has come a long way.”
  8. 8. ADM’s Defence Week Premium Edition This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publisher. www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 8 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS Despite being a surface-to-surface weapon, LRPF draws innovation from other Raytheon programs. “It is very similar to a lot of the missile designs we’ve done in the shipboard and the air defence roles,” Weinzettle said, citing Standard Missile-3 and Standard Missile-6 as examples. “We are bringing technology from both of those programs to bear on LRPF.” “One system can fire twice as many missiles, twice as fast, and it’s much cheaper because it uses one launcher with two missiles,” Horman said. ADMComment:TherecentWhitePaperallowsforalongrangefirescapability for Army – it was clearly impressed by HIMARS. There is also the intention to procure a deployable long range strike weapon with an anti-ship capability for the protection of offshore installations. Though this weapon appears to be primarily for use against fixed targets, ADM does wonder if the recently proved SM-6 anti-ship capability could lead to development of a similar role for this rocket. UUV missions without all the fuss Boeing has introduced Echo Voyager, its latest unmanned, undersea vehicle (UUV), which can operate autonomously for months at a time thanks to a hybrid rechargeable power system and modular payload bay. The 51-foot-long vehicle is not only autonomous while underway, but it can also be launched and recovered without the support ships that normally assist UUVs. Echo Voyager is the latest innovation in Boeing’s UUV family, joining the 32-foot Echo Seeker and the 18-foot Echo Ranger, both developed as test beds. “I consider them test beds because they only operate on their own for two to three days at a time – they require the surface ship for their launch and recovery,” Boeing Phantom Works director, Sea Land, Lance Towers said. “The reason why we had the family was to get the stepping stones necessary so that we had the confidence, the history and the skillset to do this system.” Echo Voyager will begin sea trials off the California coast later this summer. Echo Voyager, Boeing’s latest unmanned, undersea vehicle (UUV), can operate autonomously for months at a time thanks to a hybrid rechargeable propulsion power system and modular payload bay. ©BOEING AusDefMag FOLLOW ADM ON FACEBOOK “It is very similar to a lot of the missile designs we’ve done in the shipboard and the air defence roles.”
  9. 9. ADM’s Defence Week Premium Edition This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publisher. www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 9 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS “Echo Voyager can collect data while at sea, rise to the surface, and provide information back to users in a near real-time environment,” Towers said. Some of the missions it has been designed for include: Surface intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance/information warfare; payload deployment, critical infrastructure protection, weapons platform; unmanned aerial vehicle operations; anti-submarine warfare search and barrier; submarine decoy; mine countermeasures; and battlespace preparation. “Existing UUVs require a surface ship and crew for day-to-day operations. Echo Voyager eliminates that need and associated costs.” Towers described the UUV as a baseline vehicle designed to carry a wide variety of payloads for a multiple set of customers, and said if he were to use one word to describe Echo Voyager, it would be “awesome”. “It represents a unique, game changing approach to the way underwater autonomous systems will be used in the future, a paradigm shift that allows our customers to continually do today’s missions and future missions in a far more cost effective manner,” Towers said. Homegrown software developer boosted by Siemens Venture Capital Australian software developer PHM Technology (PHMT) has announced a strategic investment from the Venture Capital Unit of Siemens (SVC) in Germany. PHMT develops the Maintenance Aware Design environment (MADe), a model based simulation toolset that integrates reliability, availability, maintainability and safety (RAMS) and diagnostics analyses for Systems Driven Product Development. MADe is used to identify and mitigate the technical, operational and financial risk in complex systems at each stage of the product lifecycle (concept, design, operations). The toolset is used by aerospace, marine and defence organisations in Australia, China, UK, Turkey and the US. Cubic Global Defense appoints new Asia-Pacific boss Frank Wiercinski will become senior vice president and managing director, Asia-Pacific region of Cubic Global Defense (CGD), managing its Pacific region international customer base with emphasis on growth and expansion into new markets including C4ISR and integrated training. Prior to joining Cubic, Wiercinski was the vice president of Army and Special Operations Forces programs at Lockheed Martin Government Affairs, based in Washington DC, where he managed high- level senior engagements as well as supported both domestic and international business development. Veteran of industry to head strategy at Textron Peter Smith has been appointed as Textron System’s director of strategy for Australia, Asia and Oceania of its International Business Development department. Smith will be responsible for setting the strategic path for Australian business engagements, supervising development of Australian government relations and overseeing the execution of customer programs for his assigned region. Smith’s appointment comes after 40 years of experience in the aerospace and defence indus- try, more recently as a strategic advisor to governments, industry associations, and companies in Australia and internationally. PEOPLE ON THE MOVE
  10. 10. ADM’s Defence Week Premium Edition This publication is copyright and may not be reproduced in whole or part without the permission of the publisher. www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 10 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS “MADe represents the next generation of RAMS analysis.” MADeanalysesthetechnicaldatathatisusedtosupportkeydefenceactivities including system design, system acquisition, continuous improvement and life extension for air, land or naval systems. “PHM Technology are outstanding in capability and experience and MADe represents the next generation of RAMS analysis,” Dr Ralf Schnell CEO SVC said. “Our capital investment strengthens the collaboration with Siemens and drives industry leadership improving risk management during engineering and design processes.” CEO PHMT Chris Stecki said the investment is a vote of confidence in the technology by one of the largest engineering companies in the world. “It provides the company with the funds to extend our global commercialisation activities, and continue the development of MADe as a comprehensive engineering decision support tool for RAMS and diagnostics,” he said. Chris Stecki (L) receives the inaugural Australian Maritime Defence SME Innovation Grant award for MADe from the Chairman of Maritime Australia Limited, VADM Chris Ritchie (retd) at Pacific 2013. ©PHMT
  11. 11. ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 11 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION Forthcoming Events Williams Foundation Seminar – New Thinking on Air-Land Date 17 March Location Canberra Web Register here Email events@williamsfoundation.org.au Air forces need to be capable of delivering air and space power effects to support conventional and special operations in the land domain. Air-Land integration is one of the most important capabilities for successful joint operations. The seminar will explore how the ADF can take advantage of Army’s Plan Beersheba and Air Force’s Plan Jericho to enhance Air-Land integration. The seminar will be unclassified and a draft overview of proceedings can be downloaded here. Land Environment Working Group (LEWG) Date: 6 April Location: Canberra Website: govdex Email: MAJ Jonathan Engroos The Land Environment Working Group (LEWG) is a semi-annual symposium hosted by the Director General Land Development Branch, Capability Development Group and Industry Co-Chair. The LEWG aims to present the focus and direction of the Branch within the scope of Capability Development. Using a series of briefings and discussions the LEWG provides updates on major projects, emerging trends in the Land Environment while providing industry an opportunity to meet directly with Land Development officers to discuss the status of current projects. The LEWG is open to all interested representatives of small-to-medium enterprise and large corporations, both within Australia and abroad. The LEWG secretariat maintains a virtual community hosted on Govdex. The Govdex site is the primary source of information for upcoming events and aims to facilitate increased communication between representatives from Land Development and industry. Please contact MAJ Jonathan Engroos to request access to the LEWG Govdex community. The second meeting will be in Adelaide in September in conjunction with Land Forces 2016. ASPI – Defence White Paper: from the page to reality Date 6-8 April Location Canberra Web Register here The aim of this conference is to discuss the outcomes of the new Defence White Paper. The conference will bring together senior policy-makers, high-level military officials and leading industry representatives from Australia and around the world to discuss key issues surrounding the long-term opportunities and challenges for Australia’s defence and security. Please note: Early bird ticket sales cease Friday 12 February.
  12. 12. ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 12 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION CIVSEC 2016 – Civil Security and Civil Defence Date 31 May – 2 June Location Melbourne Web www.civsec.com.au Email Chris MacFarlane CIVSEC 2016 is a major international showcase of technologies, expertise and ideas in the fields of civil security and civil defence. It will address the complex and increasingly important and inter-related challenges of border control, law and order, terrorism prevention and disaster response and relief management. Theforumwillbringtogetherexperts,innovatorsandgovernmentprofessionals from throughout Australia, the Indo-Asia-Pacific region and indeed the world. DST Group Partnerships Week 2016 Date: 6-10 June Location: Melbourne Website: http://www.dsto.defence.gov.au/partnerships-week-2016 Email: Meredith Mahoney ThisisanopportunityfordelegatestobetterunderstandDST’scurrentcapabilities and future research priorities; to meet and connect with senior researchers; and to learn about RD funding opportunities. Partnerships Week 2016 will also provide a platform for networking with representatives from peer organisations and to learn of opportunities to collaborate with DST in new research programs. If your registration is successful, you will receive a formal invitation with further information regarding the event. ADM’s Defence Cyber Security Summit Date 21-22 June 2016 Location Hyatt Hotel, Canberra Organiser Informa with ADM Website ADM Events – Defence Cyber Security Summit TheannualCyberSecuritySummitisAustralia’sonlyCanberra-basedannualDefence conference. This pre-eminent gathering has featured keynote addresses from the Minister for Defence, the Chief of the Defence Force, Chiefs of both the Army and Navy, and the Deputy Secretary and First Assistant Secretary from the newly created Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group. Budgetary analysis will be provided by ASPI, and industry perspectives will be delivered by CEOs of the nation’s leading defence suppliers. Conference Producer Adam Wiltshire is now accepting a call for papers and sponsorship enquiries – confirmed speakers to date include MAJGEN Gus McLachlan and Professor Jill Slay. Get in touch to register your interest!
  13. 13. ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 13 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION Land Forces 2016 Date 6-8 September, 2016 Location Adelaide Convention Centre Organiser Land Defence Australia Website https://www.landforces.com.au A broad range of conferences, symposia and forums will be conducted in conjunction with the Land Forces trade show. See the website for more details about the various programs and trade show details. ADM Defence Estate and Base Services Summit Date 21 September, 2016 Location QT Hotel, Canberra Organiser informa and ADM Website ADM Events – Defence Estate and Base Services Summit The Defence Estate and Base Services Summit produced in conjunction with the Defence Estate and Infrastructure Group, assesses current and future opportunities for industry to work with the DEIG to deliver defence services and to manage and sustain the defence estate. ADM Northern Australia Defence Summit Date 19-20 October, 2016 Location Darwin Convention Centre Organiser informa and ADM Website ADM Events – Northern Australia Defence Summit The Northern Australia Defence Summit, is hosted by the Northern Territory Government. This policy-driven summit features Federal and Territory keynote sessions outlining future plans for the safeguard of Northern Australia and looks at the opportunities for prime and SME defence contractors be they local, national, or international. 2016 AIPM Regional Conference in conjunction with IPMA Date 16-19 October 2016 Location Sydney Organiser Australian Institute of Project Management Website Event page In October 2016, Sydney’s Hilton Hotel will play host to the inaugural AIPM Regional Conference in conjunction with IPMA. The conference will be held from 16-19 October, and there will be a focus on topical issues relevant to the Asia-Pacific region. The delegate list will include project managers from across the globe, as the program focuses on the theme of “Project Management: Delivering Capabilities”.The conference will feature top local and international industry keynotes, plenary speakers and an active social calendar including the 2016 National Project Management Achievement Awards (PMAA) Awards Dinner.
  14. 14. ISSUE 388 NEWS | INTELLIGENCE | BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES | EVENTS www.australiandefence.com.au  |  Defence Week Premium | 17 MARCH 2016 | ISSUE 388 | 14 DEFENCE WEEK PREMIUM EDITION MilCIS 2016 Date 8-10 November Location Canberra Organiser Consec Phone 02 6251 0675 Email milcis@consec.com.au Website MilCIS InNovembereachyear,theDefenceChiefInformationOfficerGroup(CIOG)partners with the University of New South Wales, Canberra and the Institute of Electronic and Electrical Engineers (IEEE) to present MilCIS. The conference facilitates a continuing dialogue between Department of Defence employees, contractors, industry and researchers to discuss current and developing technological capabilities, project initiatives, and operational requirements. We are now taking submissions for Paper Sessions, Update Sessions and Tutorial Sessions. For Product Sessions, Breakfast Sessions and Lunch Sessions see website. NZ DIA Annual Forum 2016 Date: 16-17 November Location: Viaduct Basin Events Centre Website: NZ DIA Email: contact@nzdia.co.nz The NZ Defence Industry Association organises a Forum in November each year which brings together people from the New Zealand and international defence and industry communities. Its major emphasis is on networking, and encouraging the membership to work together on developing joint approaches to defence projects in NZ and overseas. Details of the 2016 event will be published on the website as soon as possible. To list an event in the magazine or website, please contact Patrick Durrant on 02 9213 8249 or patrickdurrant@ yaffa.com.au LIST YOUR EVENT WITH ADM

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