7 secrets of volunteer recognition

596 views

Published on

Volunteers are better engaged when they receive meaningful recognition, acknowledgment and appreciation.
Secret #1: Support Meaningful Contribution
Secret #2: Minimize Poison Words; Maximize Power Words
Secret #3: Deepen What Goes Well
Secret #4: Acknowledge Good Intentions
Secret #5: Listen Attentively
Secret #6: Offer Useful Feedback
Secret #7: Randomly Appreciate

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

7 secrets of volunteer recognition

  1. 1. 7 Secrets ofVolunteer Recognition 1
  2. 2. Why do people volunteer?This is what they say: 2
  3. 3. Make a contribution 93%• Use skills/experiences 78%• Previously supported 59%• To be with friends 50%• Discover strengths 48%• Meet new people 46%• Improve job opportunities 22%• To meet religious beliefs 21%. 3
  4. 4. EngagementHeightened emotional andintellectual connection for the cause(values), organization, role, orspecific people which influencesextra effort and commitment. Adapted from Gibbons work on Employee Engagement 4
  5. 5. 5
  6. 6. #1: Support MeaningfulContribution 6
  7. 7. Define Volunteer Strengths=talent, knowledge & skill 7
  8. 8. Adaptability FriendlinessAmbitious HelpfulnessCautious ImaginationCompassion LogicConfidence MethodicalCreativity OrganizationDecisiveness PersistenceDiscipline SociabilityEnthusiasm ToleranceFairness TactfulnessFocus Understanding
  9. 9. Acknowledge volunteer strengths:• Thank you for demonstrating your . . .• Please help us with your . . .• Your . . . makes a positivedifference by . . .
  10. 10. # 2: Minimize Poison WordsMaximize Power Words WOW
  11. 11. When we use affirmativeand appropriate words andphrases we are more likelyto evoke POSITIVEreactions from people. 11
  12. 12. Decrease Increase1. You 1. I2. good/bad 2. useful, helpful3. right/wrong 3. appropriate4. should, must 4. want to, choose to5. but 5. and 12
  13. 13. Emphasize the PositiveLosada ZoneLosada concluded for every onenegative comment between 2.9013 to11.634 positives are required tomaintain a stable relationship.
  14. 14. #3. Deepen What Goes Well 14
  15. 15. Martin Seligman describes 4 waysWe respond to accomplishments:• Active and Destructive• Passive and Destructive• Passive and Constructive• Active and Constructive 15
  16. 16. Active and Constructive• Tell me more?• Who taught you that?• How did you develop that . . .?• How do you feel when you . . .? 16
  17. 17. #4. Acknowledge GoodIntentions 17
  18. 18. 1. I know you wanted this to work.2. I see you did your best.3. You put a lot of energy into this. 18
  19. 19. #5: Listen Attentively 19
  20. 20. Apathy Sympathy NOT 20
  21. 21. . . . seeking to understand 21
  22. 22. #6. Offer Useful Feedback 22
  23. 23. A) Acknowledge when all is going well.B) Make a Request when almost all is going well and you want change.C) Use Seven-Step Feedback Model when there is a serious problem. 23
  24. 24. Acknowledge1. Express appreciation for what was saidor done that supported or helped you.Example: I appreciate your position.Thank you for telling me you agree.2. Describe any helpful or notablestrengths, skills or attitudes.Example: I like your ability to stay calmwhen I’m feeling worried. 24
  25. 25. Make a Request3. Make a suggestion.4. Give two reasons for the suggestion:• what it will accomplish (the benefit).• what it will solve (prevent).3. Make an encouraging statement. 25
  26. 26. Make a Request ExampleExample: I suggest when you listen saysomething like ‘Right’ (suggestion).Then the speaker will know you’repaying attention (benefit). It will alsohelp you not miss any important points.(prevent). You already demonstrate 26wonderful care and support to others.
  27. 27. Seven-Step Feedback Model1. State the problem2. State situation-related consequences3. Probe to identify the cause of the problem4. Listen actively5. Ask the volunteer for solutions6. Develop a concise action plan with thevolunteer7. Summarize and set a time for follow-up 27
  28. 28. 7. Randomly Appreciate 28
  29. 29. Meaningful Appreciation•Action that made a difference.•Your desire/need that was met.•The pleasing emotion. M. Rosenberg 29
  30. 30. Meaningful Appreciation Example1. Action: Thank you for getting thatsummary to me as soon as you did.2. Your need: I needed it as soon aspossible.3. Emotion: I felt so relieved andgrateful when you managed to meetmy request 30
  31. 31. Patricia Morgan lightensyour load, brightens your outlookand strengthens your resilience. Contact her for your next event at 403—242-7796 or patricia@SolutionsForResilience.com 31

×