Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Literary devices s1

3,536 views

Published on

literature

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Literary devices s1

  1. 1. Literary TermsLiterary Terms We will be using these literary termsWe will be using these literary terms throughout the school year.throughout the school year.
  2. 2. We will use the following terms:We will use the following terms: CharacterCharacter AntagonistAntagonist ProtagonistProtagonist DenotationDenotation ConnotationConnotation ImageryImagery MoodMood Plot TonePlot Tone Rising ActionRising Action ClimaxClimax Falling ActionFalling Action Resolution ConflictResolution Conflict FlashbackFlashback ForeshadowingForeshadowing SuspenseSuspense Point of ViewPoint of View SettingSetting StyleStyle Theme Metaphor SimileTheme Metaphor Simile Oxymoron PersonificationOxymoron Personification AlliterationAlliteration
  3. 3. CharacterCharacter A character is a person orA character is a person or an animal that takes partan animal that takes part in the action of a literaryin the action of a literary work.work.
  4. 4. AntagonistAntagonist • The Antagonist is aThe Antagonist is a character or force in conflictcharacter or force in conflict with a main character, orwith a main character, or protagonist.protagonist.
  5. 5. Do you know any Antagonists???Do you know any Antagonists??? • On your paper take a few minutes to writeOn your paper take a few minutes to write down some Antagonists that you candown some Antagonists that you can recall from movies, television shows, andrecall from movies, television shows, and video gamesvideo games • Remember the Antagonist is in conflictRemember the Antagonist is in conflict with the Protagonist or, main character!with the Protagonist or, main character! • Helpful hint – you should now know whyHelpful hint – you should now know why people use the saying “Don’t antagonizepeople use the saying “Don’t antagonize me!”me!”
  6. 6. ProtagonistProtagonist • The Protagonist is the mainThe Protagonist is the main character in a literary workcharacter in a literary work • Can you name some famousCan you name some famous Protagonists that are found inProtagonists that are found in literature?literature?
  7. 7. DenotationDenotation The denotation of a word isThe denotation of a word is its dictionary meaning,its dictionary meaning, independent of otherindependent of other associations that the wordassociations that the word may have.may have.
  8. 8. ConnotationConnotation The connotation of a word is the set of ideasThe connotation of a word is the set of ideas associated with it in addition to its explicitassociated with it in addition to its explicit meaning. The connotation of a word canmeaning. The connotation of a word can be personal, based on individualbe personal, based on individual experiences. More often, culturalexperiences. More often, cultural connotations – those recognizable byconnotations – those recognizable by most people in a group – determine amost people in a group – determine a writer’s word choices.writer’s word choices.
  9. 9. Denotation versus ConnotationDenotation versus Connotation Some examples –Some examples – Cheap is “low in cost” (denotation) butCheap is “low in cost” (denotation) but “stingy” or “poorly made” are the“stingy” or “poorly made” are the connotations ofconnotations of cheapcheap
  10. 10. ImageryImagery ImageryImagery is words or phrasesis words or phrases that appeal to one or more ofthat appeal to one or more of the five senses. Writers usethe five senses. Writers use imagery to describe how theirimagery to describe how their subjects look, sound, feel,subjects look, sound, feel, taste, and smell.taste, and smell.
  11. 11. MOODMOOD MoodMood, or atmosphere, is the feeling, or atmosphere, is the feeling created in the reader by a literarycreated in the reader by a literary work or passage.work or passage. Often, a writer creates a mood at theOften, a writer creates a mood at the beginning of a work and then sustainsbeginning of a work and then sustains the mood throughout. Sometimes,the mood throughout. Sometimes, however, the mood of the workhowever, the mood of the work changes dramatically.changes dramatically.
  12. 12. PlotPlot Plot is the sequence of events. The first eventPlot is the sequence of events. The first event causes the second, the second causes the third,causes the second, the second causes the third, and so forth.and so forth. In most novels, dramas, short stories, and narrativeIn most novels, dramas, short stories, and narrative poems, the plot involves both characters and apoems, the plot involves both characters and a central conflict.central conflict. The plot usually begins with an exposition thatThe plot usually begins with an exposition that introduces the setting, the characters, and theintroduces the setting, the characters, and the basic situation.basic situation. The conflict then increases until it reaches a highThe conflict then increases until it reaches a high point of interest or suspense, the climax. Thepoint of interest or suspense, the climax. The climax is followed by the falling action of the centralclimax is followed by the falling action of the central conflict. Any events that occur during the fallingconflict. Any events that occur during the falling action make up the resolution.action make up the resolution.
  13. 13. PLOTLINEPLOTLINE Exposition Resolution RisingAction Climax FallingActionConflict Introduced
  14. 14. Rising ActionRising Action Rising Action is the part of the plotRising Action is the part of the plot that begins to occur as soon asthat begins to occur as soon as the conflict is introduced. Thethe conflict is introduced. The rising action adds complicationsrising action adds complications to the conflict and increasesto the conflict and increases reader interest.reader interest.
  15. 15. ClimaxClimax The Climax is the point of greatestThe Climax is the point of greatest emotional intensity, interest, oremotional intensity, interest, or suspense in the plot of asuspense in the plot of a narrative.narrative. The climax typically comes at theThe climax typically comes at the turning point in a story or drama.turning point in a story or drama.
  16. 16. Falling ActionFalling Action Falling Action is the action thatFalling Action is the action that typically follows the climax andtypically follows the climax and reveals its results.reveals its results.
  17. 17. ResolutionResolution The Resolution is the part ofThe Resolution is the part of the plot that concludes thethe plot that concludes the falling action by revealing orfalling action by revealing or suggesting the outcome ofsuggesting the outcome of the conflict.the conflict.
  18. 18. ConflictConflict Conflict is the struggleConflict is the struggle between opposing forces inbetween opposing forces in a story or play. There area story or play. There are two types of conflict thattwo types of conflict that exist in literature.exist in literature.
  19. 19. External ConflictExternal Conflict External conflict exists when a characterExternal conflict exists when a character struggles against some outside force,struggles against some outside force, such as another character, nature,such as another character, nature, society, or fate.society, or fate. Man vs. ManMan vs. Man Man vs. NatureMan vs. Nature
  20. 20. Internal ConflictInternal Conflict Internal conflict exists within the mind of aInternal conflict exists within the mind of a character who is torn between differentcharacter who is torn between different courses of action.courses of action. Man vs. HimselfMan vs. Himself
  21. 21. FlashbackFlashback A flashback is a literary device inA flashback is a literary device in which an earlier episode,which an earlier episode, conversation, or event is insertedconversation, or event is inserted into the sequence of events.into the sequence of events. They are often presented as aThey are often presented as a memory of the narrator or ofmemory of the narrator or of another character.another character.
  22. 22. ForeshadowingForeshadowing Foreshadowing is the author’s use of cluesForeshadowing is the author’s use of clues to hint at what might happen later in theto hint at what might happen later in the story. Writers use foreshadowing to buildstory. Writers use foreshadowing to build their readers’ expectations and to createtheir readers’ expectations and to create suspense.suspense. This is used to help readers prepare forThis is used to help readers prepare for what is to come.what is to come.
  23. 23. Point of ViewPoint of View Point of View is the perspective from whichPoint of View is the perspective from which a story is told. It is the relationship of thea story is told. It is the relationship of the narrator to the story.narrator to the story. First-person is told by a character who usesFirst-person is told by a character who uses the first-person pronoun “I”.the first-person pronoun “I”. Third-person limited point of view is theThird-person limited point of view is the point of view where the narrator usespoint of view where the narrator uses third-person pronouns such as “he” andthird-person pronouns such as “he” and “she” to refer to the characters.“she” to refer to the characters.
  24. 24. SettingSetting The setting of a literary work is the time and placeThe setting of a literary work is the time and place of the action.of the action. The setting includes all the details of a place andThe setting includes all the details of a place and time – the year, the time of day, even thetime – the year, the time of day, even the weather. The place may be a specific country,weather. The place may be a specific country, state, region, community, neighborhood,state, region, community, neighborhood, building, institution, or home.building, institution, or home. In most stories, the setting serves as a backdropIn most stories, the setting serves as a backdrop – a context in which the characters interact.– a context in which the characters interact. The setting of a story often helps to create aThe setting of a story often helps to create a particular mood, or feeling.particular mood, or feeling.
  25. 25. StyleStyle Style is the distinctive way in whichStyle is the distinctive way in which an author uses language.an author uses language. Word choice, phrasing, sentenceWord choice, phrasing, sentence length, tone, dialogue, purpose,length, tone, dialogue, purpose, and attitude toward the audienceand attitude toward the audience and subject can all contribute toand subject can all contribute to an author’s writing style.an author’s writing style.
  26. 26. ThemeTheme The theme of a literary work is its centralThe theme of a literary work is its central message, concern, or purpose. A theme canmessage, concern, or purpose. A theme can usually be expressed as a generalization, orusually be expressed as a generalization, or general statement, about people or life.general statement, about people or life. It may be stated directly by the writer although itIt may be stated directly by the writer although it is more often presented indirectly, the readeris more often presented indirectly, the reader must figure out the theme by looking carefully atmust figure out the theme by looking carefully at what the work reveals about the people or aboutwhat the work reveals about the people or about life.life.
  27. 27. ToneTone Tone is a reflection of a writer’s or speaker’sTone is a reflection of a writer’s or speaker’s attitude toward a subject of a poem, story, orattitude toward a subject of a poem, story, or other literary work.other literary work. It be communicated through words and details thatIt be communicated through words and details that express particular emotions and that evoke andexpress particular emotions and that evoke and emotional response from the reader.emotional response from the reader. For example, word choice or phrasing may seemFor example, word choice or phrasing may seem to convey respect, anger, or sarcasm.to convey respect, anger, or sarcasm.
  28. 28. MetaphorMetaphor A Metaphor is a type of speech thatA Metaphor is a type of speech that compares or equates two or more thingscompares or equates two or more things that have something in common. Athat have something in common. A metaphor does NOT usemetaphor does NOT use likelike oror asas.. Example: Life is a bowlExample: Life is a bowl of cherries.of cherries.
  29. 29. SimileSimile A Simile is another figure of speech thatA Simile is another figure of speech that compares seemingly unlike things.compares seemingly unlike things. Simile’s DO use the wordsSimile’s DO use the words likelike oror asas.. Example: Her voice was like nails on aExample: Her voice was like nails on a chalkboard.chalkboard.
  30. 30. OxymoronOxymoron An Oxymoron is a figure of speech that is aAn Oxymoron is a figure of speech that is a combination of seemingly contradictorycombination of seemingly contradictory words.words. Examples:Examples: Same differenceSame difference Pretty uglyPretty ugly Roaring silenceRoaring silence
  31. 31. PersonificationPersonification Personification is aPersonification is a figure of speech infigure of speech in which an animal,which an animal, object, force ofobject, force of nature, or idea isnature, or idea is given human qualitiesgiven human qualities or characteristics.or characteristics. Example:Example: Tears beganTears began to fall from the darkto fall from the dark clouds.clouds.
  32. 32. AlliterationAlliteration Alliteration is the repetition of sounds, mostAlliteration is the repetition of sounds, most often consonant sounds, at the beginningoften consonant sounds, at the beginning of words. Alliteration gives emphasis toof words. Alliteration gives emphasis to words.words. Example: Peter Piper picked a peck ofExample: Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepperspickled peppers

×