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Fundamentals of human behavior

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To know different human behavior, its fundamentals and concepts.

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Fundamentals of human behavior

  1. 1. FUNDAMENTALS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR FR. PASCUAL SALAS, OSM
  2. 2. NATURE OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Any act of an individual person which is considered human behavior is a reflection of his thoughts, feelings and emotions. It mirrors his needs, values, motivation, inspiration, conflicts and state of life. Behavior, therefore, consists of all human activities.
  3. 3. NATURE OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR refers to the range of behaviors exhibited by humans and which are influenced by culture, attitudes, emotions, values, ethics, authority, rapport, hypnosis, persuasion, coercion and genetics.
  4. 4. NATURE OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR The behavior of humans (and other organisms or even mechanisms) falls within a range with some behavior being common, some unusual, some acceptable, and some outside acceptable limits.
  5. 5. SCOPE OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Human behavior is studied by the specialised academic disciplines of psychiatry, psychology, social work, sociology, economics, and anthropology.
  6. 6. SCOPE OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Human behavior is experienced throughout an individual’s entire lifetime. It includes the way they act based on different factors such as genetics, social norms, core faith, and attitude.
  7. 7. SCOPE OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR GENETICS: Behaviour is impacted by certain traits each individual has.
  8. 8. SCOPE OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Social norms also impact behaviour. Due to the inherently conformist nature of human society in general, humans are pressurised into following certain rules and display certain behaviours in society, which conditions the way people behave.
  9. 9. SCOPE OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Core faith can be perceived through the religion and philosophy of that individual.
  10. 10. SCOPE OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Attitude can be defined as "the degree to which the person has a favorable or unfavorable evaluation of the behavior in question.”
  11. 11. CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  WINDOWS OF THE WORLD: SENSING AND PERCEIVING  PRIMARY SENSES  HUMAN ORGANISM IS HIGHLY SENSITIVE TO ITS ENVIRONMENT BECAUSE OF THESE SENSES  EACH SENSE REPRESENTED BY RECEPTOR ORGANS
  12. 12. CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR VISUAL RECEPTORS AUDITORY RECEPTORS TASTE RECEPTORS
  13. 13. CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR SENSATION: IS A TERM APPLIED TO WHAT OCCURS EACH TIME A RECEPTOR ORGAN IS STIMULATED. SIGHT, HEARING, TASTE, TOUCH, SMELL, KINESTHETIC SENSE, VESTIBULAR SENSE, INTERNAL SENSE
  14. 14. CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR • KINESTHETIC SENSE: SENSE OF THE BODY MOVEMENT, POSTURE, AND WEIGHT • VESTIBULAR SENSE: SENSE OF BALANCE • INTERNAL SENSE (INTEROCEPTOR): SENSE OF HUNGER, THIRST
  15. 15. CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  PERCEPTION: IS THE PROCESS THROUGH WHICH THE VARIOUS SENSATIONS ARE INTERPRETED AND ORGANIZED INTO MEANINGFUL PATTERNS.  INVOLVES “BECOMING AWARE OF OBJECTS, QUALITIES OR RELATIONS BY WAY OF THE SENSES ORGANS”
  16. 16. CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  STIMULUS CHARACTERISTICS  SIZE – LARGE PICTURES AND LOUD NOISES RECEIVE MORE ATTENTION THAN SMALL PICTURES AND SOFT SOUNDS.  CONTRAST – TWO SOUNDS OR TWO COLORS THAT CONTRAST WITH EACH OTHER MAY ATTRACT ATTENTION THAN TWO THAT ARE SIMILAR.
  17. 17. CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR COLOR – CERTAIN COLORS AND COLOR COMBINATIONS ATTRACT NOTICE THAN OTHERS. MOVEMENT – A MOVING OBJECT IS MORE LIKELY TO BE NOTICED THAN A STILL OBJECT.
  18. 18. CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR UNIQUENESS AND NOVELTY – THE NEW AND UNUSUAL GAIN ATTENTION. (OLD AND FAMILIAR BLEND WITH THE NEW AND UNIQUE) REPETITION – ATTRACTS ATTENTION IF IT APPEARS OVER AND OVER AGAIN.
  19. 19. CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  PERCEIVER CHARACTERISTICS  NEEDS – HUNGER, LOVE  EXPERIENCES – PREVIOUS EXPERIENCES ALSO AFFECTS ATTENTION AND PERCEPTION  SET – BECAUSE OF PREVIOUS EXPERIENCES, IT HAPPENS TO ANTICIPATE OF EXPECT THAT THEY WILL OCCUR.  PERSONAL RIGIDITY – BEING RIGID AND INFLEXIBLE AFFECT PERCEPTION.
  20. 20. CONCEPTS AND PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  PERCEPTUAL CONSTANCY – REFERS TO A PROCESS BY WHICH WE INTERPRET SENSATIONS TO COINCIDE WITH WHAT IS NORMAL, RATHER THAN PERCEIVING THEM AS OBJECTIVE SENSATIONS.  DISTORTED PERCEPTIONS INCLUDE ILLUSIONS AND HALLUCINATIONS.
  21. 21. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR PASSIVE AGGRESSIVE ASSERTIVE PASSIVE-AGGRESSIVE
  22. 22. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR ALTERNATOR - switch between passive and aggressive, which is different to passive-aggressive ASSERTIVENESS – the ultimate goal. what type of primary behavior you use by reading the examples.
  23. 23. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Mary was referred to a counsellor as she was simply run down and suffering depression and anxiety. Mary is a lawyer, maintaining a full-time job, married and has a daughter. Mary's mother relies on Mary for everything, even though she is fit and healthy and can do things for herself without impairment. She has Mary driving her to appointments, helping to clean her home, take her shopping, etc. Mary's sister, who won't do a thing or talk with Mary, only thinks Mary is chasing all their mothers money for inheritance.
  24. 24. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Marys husband worked part-time, did little around the house, left cooking for Mary and most of the cleaning. Mary was missing out on spending time with her daughter, even though her daughter constantly demanded playtime from Mary. Her daughter required to be cared for with duties, cleaning her room, meals, clothes washed, etc. Her daughter blamed Mary for not spending any time with her to play, as all she did was work and help others.
  25. 25. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Mary was snowed down and behind at work, felt inadequate and was hoping her partners didn't catch on that she was behind. For every client she completed, another two would hit her desk. She knew that it was coming that she could no longer hide her failure to complete her work from the firms partners. She felt like an imposter, and was just waiting to be discovered. She has been passed over for a pay rise, she was constantly criticized for forgetting about important meetings.
  26. 26. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Marys life had become unmanageable. Marys actions to try and constantly please everyone was failing her in every area, her depression and anxiety overwhelmed her, affecting her employment, her relationships, her self-esteem and self-worth as a human being.  ???
  27. 27. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR The Passive Style
  28. 28. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  "Damn it", Shirley states, "I forgot to bring the questionnaires again." This has been going on for two weeks now, Shirley failing to bring in the questionnaires she claimed to have completed. Regardless, Shirley's behavior was beginning to state she was depressed. What was clear is that Shirley feared others, which she accepted, though her anger showed, which she couldn't admit to.
  29. 29. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Shirley was in her 30's and worked in a Government office. The floor was all open cubicles, and office politics and gossip was prevalent at all times. Shirley dwelt on the office politics, from who was being promoted, who got the cubicle or office with a view, every piece of gossip. During counseling, Shirley smiled when discussing office politics, admitting to deceptive maneuvering behind her supervisors and colleagues back. When asked if she has ever raised her issues or concerns with her supervisors, she had not done so. She claimed it was better to do things "behind the scenes" to achieve her purpose.
  30. 30. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Basically, Shirley was ignoring some tasks, others she was doing poorly, knowing she wouldn't get picked to do them again, and some she would sneakily palm off to co-workers, getting them to do it and claim it as her own. The only problem with all this behavior, was that Shirley was consistently passed over for promotion, even though she had near the most knowledge about the organizations inner workings. She was emotionally close with nobody, and slighted anyone who would show resentment towards her.
  31. 31. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Her private life was no different. She was single since a divorce years earlier, feared rejection so she didn't date, and even though one of her best traits was making others laugh, she used it to keep people at arms length. Shirley had no friends as a result. Shirley simply feared facing people, she feared confrontation even when she knew she was right, or felt attacked, and instead she would bottle up her emotion and get them back when the time was right, where she could not be held accountable.  ???
  32. 32. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Passive-Aggressive Behavior
  33. 33. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Jason owns a local car dealership, employing 10 others as part of sales and support staff. Jason is a snappy dresser, confident, full of self-esteem. The problem though is that Jason's wife has given him an ultimatum, seek counseling or she is leaving him due to his aggressive behavior.
  34. 34. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Jason was pretty dissatisfied with life. He was under constant pressure running his business, dealing with difficult suppliers, finding adequate employee's who didn't require constant supervision to do their job. As a result, Jason found himself often losing his temper at work, which came home with him as well. He would order his employee's around, micro-managing. He would shout at suppliers. His anger got that bad, he even got aggressive with some customers and removed them from his premises for being difficult.
  35. 35. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Jason bossed his wife and kids around, ordering and demanding from them. When he wasn't yelling, he would place "no talk" time on his family, no answering anything they had to say and calling it his quiet time, completely ignoring them. Jason dismissed his wife's views and her feelings.
  36. 36. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR  Jason communicated to his counselor that he knew his family was now going around him, avoiding him, doing things without consulting with him or involving him, due to his anger. He was over-protective of his children, trying to protect them too much, which was in itself aggressive and abusive to the realities of the world. To Jason, he needed control, and if he didn't have it, then he had to threaten others until he got it. ???
  37. 37. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Aggressive Behavior
  38. 38. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Alternating Behavior can often be found in people with mood and personality disorders Schizophrenics
  39. 39. MODELS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR Assertive Behavior a behavior where all persons desires are respected
  40. 40. THANK YOU VERY MUCH

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