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Sustainable Soil Management With Inclusive Digitalisation

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Sustainable Soil Management With Inclusive Digitalisation

  1. 1. 29.06.2018 INCLUSIVE DIGITALIZATION: NICE for Sustainable Soil Management (niceSSM) former CCKN-IA Project SUSTAINABLE SOILS AND SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE
  2. 2. 29.06.2018 Content 1. Setting the stage - Key Facts about the project 2. Looking back – what is the most important success factor of your ICT- solution? 3. Where have been the biggest challenges? Questions?
  3. 3. “Due to Climate change, I was facing lot of problems. Everything has changed; climate shocks affect the crop yield. Farming has been passed from generations and is still the only source of income but not the sustainable one. - Babulal Gowda (farmer from Odisha)  Over 5.7 million Ha affected in 2009 due to late arrival of monsoon and erratic rainfall  10 times increase in incidences of extreme weather events from 1930 to 2010  9 million farmers in Maharashtra, over were affected by drought in 2015  Intensive cultivation and depletion of soil fertility  120 M Ha of land is degraded  Nearly 3.7 M ha is deteriorated due to depletion of organic matter  Additional 76 million tonnes of food grains to be produced to feed the growing population  Vision 2022: Doubling of farmers incomes – technology, resource management and better markets
  4. 4. ???
  5. 5. Use of NICE  NICE as advisory platform for climate change successfully piloted  Strengthening capacities and knowledge to enhance resilience of farmers  ProSoil further develops NICE as a living tool:  Integration of soil health and weather based information (weather services from IMD)  Strong real time reporting tool: analysis of data at every level Soil Protection and Rehabilitation for Food Security Establishment of localized, dynamic, two-way advisory process: Network for Information on Climate (Ex) change - NICE NICE: An ICT innovation - cross-cutting solutions to achieve SDGs -  Web-based open source platform  Adaptive and scalable ICT supported by 2 mobile APPs (API based)  Import and export of data and information from existing agriculture systems  Institutional mechanisms to timely develop and disseminate validated, localized, quality advisories  Localization and decentralized advisories to farmers using multiple modes  two-way communication  Content creation by authorized persons  3-tier validation process
  6. 6. Establishing scalable approaches and solutions towards Sustainable Soil Management Sustainability and Convergence Area based soil protection and sustainable farming measures niceSSM Inclusive Digital Transformatio n for Rural Advisory and Services Urban-Rural Cycle Business models on “Closing the carbon and nutrient loop” NICE as digital platform Developing a digital platform for advisory and monitoring 1 3 42 South-South exchange, Collaborations, synergies and leveraging Objectives  Implemented measures are covering an area of 53,000 ha (area approach);  Yield increases of 28% (wheat, rice, pigeon pea)  Strengthening public support and extension services using ICT based NICE platform  Guidelines for mainstreaming innovative incentive mechanisms for soil fertility management  Facilitation of stakeholder networks at national and international levels and Contributing to the dialogue on soil health  Improved exchange and learning through South-South exchange Start with CCKN-IA, now Soil Protection and Rehabilitation for Food Security (ProSoil) Strategic cooperation with: National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) Time line: 2015 - 2021 Implemented in Maharahstra, Madhya Pradesh Implemented by GIZ (in cooperations with NGOs - BAIF, WOTR, FES; Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare, MOAFW, MANAGE; UDD Maharashtra, State Agricultural Universities, IISS, BITS Pilani Univ. and international research institutes- ICRISAT, IWMI, SEI, Leeds, CIAT, Krishi Vigyan Kendras)
  7. 7. Most important success factor  Open source, adaptive ICT backbone called NICE (Network for Information on Climate (Ex) change across multiple stakeholders  Institutional mechanisms for effective, timely development of localized quality advisories and its dissemination  Quality Assurance : ICTs amplify  Effective Delivery  Partner with the ICT Industry  NTT DATA  Digital Agenda of the government of India  The project endorsed the Principles for Digital Development fully from the beginning on
  8. 8. 29.06.2018  More than 90% farmers perceived that advisories were locally contextual and relevant to their needs  91% farmers said the advisories are localized and understandable  65% of farmers received responses to their queries within 2 days and almost 62% said the responses addressed their needs  The solutions provided through advisories were affordable and easy to implement  76.89% surveyed member farmers adopted 50% or more advisories disseminated through CCKN-IA  Builds on knowledge and expertise of over 1200 experts and extension cadre  Delivers localized advisories to around 173,000 farmers  85% of the farmers reported benefiting from increased yields and 74% from reduced production costs. Impact
  9. 9. 29.06.2018 Where have been the biggest challenges?  Missing support / capacities within GIZ towards ICT based solutions in 2013  Find team members who are able to act agile and have a understanding, both on ICT and Agriculture  Capacities on partner side / find the right partner  Limited access to the ICT System at Ministry level  Ensuring gender balance  Hardware and willingness to invest
  10. 10. “The key to success is the proper information and knowledge about agriculture” – Namita, Odisha, “I am saving approximately 50% of the money which I used to spend on pesticides. Other farmers also come to me for timely information and knowledge” – Ranchandar, a grapes farmer from Maharashtra Kamakhya a farmer from Odisha, got a yield of 15 quintals of rice per acre, making him the champion in his village The advisories have really improved my knowledge. I try to implement myself in the field. It’s always good to implement the information by myself and also share with fellow farmers- Ghansu Mahto a farmers from Jharkhand
  11. 11. “Earlier the information flow was asymmetric and largely it was top-down to communities but not vice-versa. Now farmers get better and localized advisories on almost a real time basis. After weekly meetings or even otherwise, I send queries of the farmers and the response time is 2-7 days which is very quick” – Baby Behera, Local Extension Expert, Odisha INDIA@COP22
  12. 12. Digitalization can effectively help in quality localized knowledge management for adaptation in agriculture Questions? Contacts: navin.horo@giz.de florian.moder@giz.de

Editor's Notes

  • Not only longer term climate change impacts agriculture but short term climate variations may result in food security challenges. More than 240 million farmers in India are dependent on rainfall. The incidences of extreme weather events like drought, floods, heat waves, cold waves and others have increased in last few decades.
  • “I receive around 100 advisories in a week. Most of them I do not read as they are not useful for me and quite a few I do not understand”

    Print and mass media,
    Mobile
    web
    Call Centers
    The traditional extension system

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