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PRI Community Schools Approach

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Rural Community Schools Approach
April 2022

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We are catalyzing a national movement to
accelerate rural student success, cradle to
career.
We see community schools as a...

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This presentation outlines:
● The Need
● The Community Schools Solution
● Our Place-based, Rural Approach
● How We Will Gr...

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PRI Community Schools Approach

  1. 1. Rural Community Schools Approach April 2022
  2. 2. We are catalyzing a national movement to accelerate rural student success, cradle to career. We see community schools as a key strategy for catalyzing this movement. 2
  3. 3. This presentation outlines: ● The Need ● The Community Schools Solution ● Our Place-based, Rural Approach ● How We Will Grow Our Impact 3
  4. 4. We must fundamentally reimagine schools to address the challenges of persistent poverty Persistent poverty exerts powerful constraints on access to opportunity and upward mobility. Children in poverty are more likely to experience food and housing insecurity and are more likely to suffer from poor nutrition and inadequate healthcare -- all factors that impact learning. As a result, poverty is strongly linked to academic failure, school dropout, and reduced rates of college attendance and graduation. 4 Source: Showalter, D., Klein, R., Johnson, J., & Hartman, S. L. (2017). Why rural matters 2015-2016: Understanding the changing landscape. https://www.instituteforchildsuccess.org/themencode-pdf-viewer/?file=https://www.instituteforchildsuccess.org/wp- content/uploads/2017/06/WhyRuralMatters-2017.pdf; The impact of poverty on educational outcomes for children. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2528798/. The challenge of persistent poverty A need to reimagine schools Working in isolation, schools cannot overcome the effects of concentrated poverty. There must be a holistic approach to addressing student needs, inside and outside the classroom.
  5. 5. This need is especially urgent in Rural America 5 Due to federal and state funding formulas, smaller schools, declining populations, and less philanthropic support, rural schools have less funding than urban districts to support student success. Rural families experience high rates of poverty Of the poorest 250 counties in the United States, 244 are rural. 64% of rural counties have high rates of child poverty. One in five poor children in this country live in a rural area. Rural schools receive less funding than urban schools Rural families often have limited access to affordable out- of-school services and supports Rural areas are typically home to fewer community organizations than urban and suburban areas. As a result, rural families have fewer opportunities to access the holistic services that support student success.
  6. 6. Community schools provide students and families holistic supports and services to accelerate success What is a community school? • An integrated approach to academics, health and social services, youth and community development, and community engagement that leads to improved student learning, stronger families, and healthier communities. • A place where every family and community member is a partner in the effort to build on students’ strengths, engage them as learners, and enable them to reach their full potential. • A set of partnerships between the school and other community resources that ensures children and families get the integrated services they need, thus ensuring that funding for health, mental health, expanded learning time, and social services is well spent and effective. • An approach that is tailored to the local context, building on community assets and addressing community needs. 6 Source: Brookings, “Addressing education inequality with a next generation of community schools: A blueprint for mayors, states, and the federal government” A model that research shows helps meet the educational needs of students in high poverty schools and leads to improvement in student and school outcomes.
  7. 7. PFE has leveraged public investment to implement community schools in 50 schools across 10 rural districts 7 2011: Jackson (5), Clay (9), and Owsley (2) 2016: Knox (10), Corbin (4), and Barbourville (1) 2017: Perry (8) and Hazard (3) 2014: Knox (10) 2018: Berea (3) 2020: Leslie (5) Promise Neighborhood Community School Full Service Community School
  8. 8. Across our sites we have seen positive impacts across a range of outcome measures 8 ● Kindergarten readiness ● Reading and math proficiency ● School attendance ● Chronic absenteeism ● High school graduation ● Postsecondary readiness ● Student engagement with school ● Teacher interactions with families ● Student and parent perception of school support and connectedness
  9. 9. Our community schools approach brings a rural lens to evidence-backed and field tested national models PFE Rural Community Schools Approach* Place-Based, Rural Lens Cradle-to-Career Approach Cross-Sector, Results Focus Effective Community Schools *Our approach is influenced by research, our work in the field, and leading national practice including the approaches of Harlem Children Zone, StriveTogether, and the Annie E. Casey Foundation.
  10. 10. Four Pillars of Effective Community Schools + Foundation of challenging academic content and supports We partner with school teams to implement the foundational pillars of effective community schools Collaborative leadership and practice to assess needs, plan and coordinate services, and continually monitor data. Holistic and integrated student supports including mental, physical, and social emotional health care; nutrition support; and housing assistance. Expanded and enriched learning time including after- school and summer programs that provide relevant, real world learning opportunities. Active family and community engagement grounded in meaningful partnership with students, families, and community members. Foundation of challenging academic content and supports to ensure that students graduate ready for success in college and career. Adapted from Maier, A., Daniel, J., Oakes, J., & Lam, L. (2017). Community schools as an effective school improvement strategy: A review of the evidence. Palo Alto, CA: Learning Policy Institute. Effective Community Schools
  11. 11. A PFE supported site-based coordinator brings the capacity needed to implement evidence-based practices Adapted from Learning Policy Institute; Robert Balfanz. February 2013. Overcoming the Poverty Challenge to Enable College and Career Readiness for All The Crucial Role of Student Supports. A full-time Community Schools site-based coordinator brings dedicated capacity to partner closely with the principal and school staff to adopt, adapt, and implement evidence-based practices aligned to the pillars and academic focus: ● Use data to identify and monitor student and school needs ● Implement early warning systems ● Employ a case management approach and multi-tiered system of support ● Align instruction across grades ● Implement high-quality, content-rich curriculum ● Strategically identify, align, and activate high quality community partners ● Engage and empower families to support student success Four Pillars of Effective Community Schools + Foundation of challenging academic content and supports Effective Community Schools + Site-based Coordinator Principal Staff PFE support, tools, resources, and training to build capacity and accelerate success School-based team
  12. 12. We take a place-based approach that is tailored to to the uniqueness of rural place District-wide adoption to support and sustain systemic, community-wide change over time and to support seamless student transitions across grades. Neighborhood- wide programs and services that provide the multigeneration opportunities for children and their families to thrive in school, work, and life. Culturally relevant approach that recognizes the power of place, helps build an asset-based mindset and approach, and engages the community as partners in the work. Resident-led change including hiring local residents to fill key positions and providing ongoing leadership capacity building tools and supports. Practitioner capacity building that connects local leaders and staff with leading practices, tools and resources, and networks of support, to strengthen their ability to lead enduring change. Systems, structures, and practices tailored to rural place, identified through decades of experience working as rural practitioners. Place-based Rural Lens
  13. 13. We identify partners to support holistic child development birth through 5. We emphasize challenging academics and supports and work across all grades K-12 to ensure students have the supports they need to graduate ready for college. We support FAFSA completion, and college planning and transitions, to ensure students are set up for success. We expand opportunities for career exploration (e.g. summer internships, other work opportunities). We create a tiered system of integrated supports with a focus on wellness & safety (e.g. integration of substance abuse prevention into curricula; building social emotional competencies) and linkages for students and families to family counseling, and physical and mental health care. 13 Our approach begins at birth and extends beyond grade 12 to ensure a seamless transition to postsecondary Enter K- Ready Achieve Academic Proficiency Graduate High School College- Ready Earn Post- secondary Degree Gain Meaningful Employment Safe, Healthy, Supported Pipeline of high-quality cradle-to-career services that address the factors inside and outside of school that impact student success. Cradle-to- Career Approach
  14. 14. We put results at the center of our work and create the leadership structures needed to facilitate and sustain success. We incorporate proven leadership approaches and structures to center results and sustain success We use StriveTogether’s cross sector leadership table structure to ensure there is the cross sector engagement needed to activate, align, and sustain resources. Each place-based Community Schools effort is initiated by a consortium of local partners that sets the vision and overall strategy, commits resources to ensure the work gets done, and breaks down political or organizational barriers that inhibit the system from working effectively. We use the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Results Counts framework to center population-level results and focus on data- driven decision-making. For 25 years, Casey has used Results Count® to help leaders in the social and public sectors achieve better outcomes for children and families, supporting initiatives that help children get ready for school, reduce reliance on juvenile detention and incarceration and help more young people grow up in families. Enduring cross sector leadership structures Results-based leadership Cross-sector, Results Focus
  15. 15. The PFE Rural Community Schools Approach 15 Enter Kindergarten Ready Achieve Academic Proficiency Graduate High School College- Ready Earn Postsecondary Degree Gain Meaningful Employment Safe, Healthy, Supported District-wide adoption Neighborhood- wide programs and services Resident-led change Culturally relevant approach Practitioner capacity building Results-based leadership approach Enduring cross sector leadership structures Site-based leadership Collaborative leadership and practice Holistic and integrated student supports Expanded and enriched learning time Active family and community engagement Challenging academic content and supports Cradle- to-Career Approach Place- based, Rural Lens School- site Model Cross- sector, Results Focus
  16. 16. We’ve identified the most important indicators for launching and sustaining rural community schools • District and school leaders believe that families and the community bring assets and must be at the table. They see schools as the heart of the community, and embrace the need to be open to the community • Senior district leadership prioritizes the work and understands the need to champion the effort and build systems to ensure sustained support • Principals have an openness to shared leadership, and a desire to lead school-level change by adopting and sustaining new practices • Community partner leaders are open and willing to collaborate, and formalize that commitment in an MOA that includes providing access to student-level data to the Project Director and Site Coordinators • High degree of trust across the principal, site coordinator, community partners, and the PFE Community Schools support team • Dedicated school level site coordinator, from the place, with the responsibility and “arms and legs” to drive the work forward • School site collaboration structures that bring together partners to learn about each other’s work, identify opportunities to align their programs to school goals • Commitment to, and systems and practices to support, data-driven decision- making and continuous improvement • Actively engaged cross sector Partnership Council that can activate and align resources and supports 16 Readiness criteria Success factors
  17. 17. Let’s Grow the Impact of Rural Community Schools 17
  18. 18. 18 We are excited by the potential of increased investment in Full-Service Community Schools (from $30M up to $443M) It is imperative that rural places apply for and secure these funds. It is critical that the entities that secure these funds be supported in moving the dial on results.
  19. 19. We will focus on two strategies to achieve this goal We will continue to manage our current schools and will launch new schools in Central Appalachia 19 Direct growth: Grow the number of directly led PFE rural community schools Partner-led growth: Support community-based partners to launch rural community schools We will provide pre- and post- launch support to a network of community-based partners across the United States to use the PFE approach to design and launch new rural community schools Mutually reinforcing feedback loop: Our direct work informs our rural lens and how we support schools. Through our work supporting schools, we identify promising practices to inform our approach.
  20. 20. 20 Partner-led growth: Support community-based partners to launch rural community schools We will support a network of partners through a number of different strategies Site coordinator and principal training Coaching Program design support Pre-Launch Launch Post-Launch Access to PFE rural community schools playbook Site visits Community of Practice participation Partnership council design and support Access to learning resources Initial intensive Project Director and Site Coordinator training
  21. 21. Effective community schools move outcomes for students, especially students in high poverty schools A comprehensive review of more than 140 studies demonstrates that well implemented community schools help meet the educational needs of low- performing students in high poverty schools and leads to improvement in student and school outcomes. 21 Source: Maier, A., Daniel, J., Oakes, J., & Lam, L. (2017). Community schools as an effective school improvement strategy: A review of the evidence. Palo Alto, CA: Learning Policy Institute.

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