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Building Organizational Trust in Schools for Family Engagement

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Building Organizational Trust
in Schools for Family
Engagement

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Your Presenters
Rochelle Garrett, MSW
Director of Integrated Strategies
Grace McKenzie, MSW
Associate Director of Family
P...

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Building Organizational Trust in Schools for Family Engagement

  1. 1. 1
  2. 2. Building Organizational Trust in Schools for Family Engagement
  3. 3. Your Presenters Rochelle Garrett, MSW Director of Integrated Strategies Grace McKenzie, MSW Associate Director of Family Partnership
  4. 4. We are a national organization, with roots in Appalachia, committed to rural student success 4
  5. 5. We address three barriers to rural student success: 5 Programming Gaps Students in rural communities have limited access to high quality programs to meet their diverse needs, from cradle to career. Inequitable Systems and Structures Current systems, policies and structures do not support equitable educational outcomes in rural places. Schools and communities lack access to the tools, techniques, and supports needed to tackle the challenges rural students and families face. Capacity Constraints
  6. 6. Context • Family engagement is an essential condition for student achievement. • Effective family engagement cannot be established without trust.
  7. 7. Pick a statement that is significant to you • Organizations don’t work together, people work together • Trust takes years to build, seconds to break, and forever to repair. • This work (of building trust in organizations) moves at the speed of relationships. • The more you trust someone, the more they’ll trust you. • Trust is choosing to make something important to you vulnerable to the actions of someone else.- Charles Feltman
  8. 8. Different aspects of trust in schools • Integrity: Do staff keep their word with families? • Competence: Do staff honor families competence in their multiple roles to support students? • Respect: Do staff seek input and listen carefully to all families? • Personal Regard: Do staff consistently show families that they value and care about them as people? • Consistency: Are staff reliable in communicating with families on important issues? • Openness: Are staff clear and kind with families about concerns and joys of working with their children? Freedom Learning, Group (n.d); Fredrick, L. (2021).
  9. 9. How we talk matters
  10. 10. Two-way Communication “The goal of fostering two-way communication between school and home requires school leaders to be relentless in their insistence that communications be respectful, honest, and timely." (Parrett & Budge, 2016).
  11. 11. Equity and Organizational Trust • "First, schools must reject deficit-based views of families." • "Second, the new normal requires a codesign model of engagement." • "Third, family engagement must be seen as a core element of effective and equitable educational practice."
  12. 12. Additional resource for FE with an equity lens • https://www.cde.c a.gov/fg/aa/lc/doc uments/family- engagement.pdf
  13. 13. Actions to support trust • Integrity: Work with your school board to ensure that staff have the time to follow through on their commitments to families. • Competence: Celebrate families in your school! • Respect: Provide structured opportunities for deep conversations with families that ask questions like these • Personal Regard: Help staff acknowledge the resources families have and the challenges families are experiencing. • Consistency: Train and support staff on best practices for communicating consistently. • Openness: Train and support staff on best practices for having hard conversations with families.
  14. 14. Actions to move the work forward • Make a commitment to what will do when you go back to build organizational trust • Share the commitment
  15. 15. Access our slide deck for all the links! https://bit.ly/trustRCASS
  16. 16. Bibliography • Brewster, C. and Railsback, J. (2003). Building Trust with Schools and Diverse Families: A Foundation for Lasting Partnerships. Portland, OR: Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. • Fredrick, L. (2021). Dr. Karen Mapp on Building Strong family-school partnerships for reopening and beyond. Dr. Karen Mapp on Building Strong Family-School Partnerships for Reopening and Beyond. Retrieved April 18, 2022, from https://www.panoramaed.com/blog/dr-karen-mapp-strong-family- school-partnerships-reopening-beyond Freedom Learning Group. (n.d.). Trust and Leadership . Lumen. Retrieved March 30, 2022, from https://courses.lumenlearning.com/wm-organizationalbehavior/chapter/trust- and-leadership/ • Mapp, K., & Bergman, E. (2021, June). Embracing a New Normal: Toward a More Liberatory Approach to Family Engagement. Carnegie Center. Retrieved April 18, 2022, from https://media.carnegie.org/filer_public/f6/04/f604e672- 1d4b-4dc3-903d-3b619a00cd01/fe_report_fin.pdf • Parrett, W., & Budge, K. (2016, May 18). How can high-poverty schools engage families and the community? Edutopia. Retrieved April 18, 2022, from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/high-poverty-schools-engage-families- community-william-parrett-kathleen-budge
  17. 17. All Appalachian Students Succeed Rochelle Garrett Garrettl@berea.edu & Grace McKenzie Mckenzieg@berea.edu

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