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Dr Pankaj Gupta HIR Ivey

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Dr Pankaj Gupta HIR Ivey Canada

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Dr Pankaj Gupta HIR Ivey

  1. 1. Health Innovator in Residence Orientation Package January 2013
  2. 2. 2 | P a g e Dr. Anne Snowdon, RN, BScN, MSc, PhD Chair International Centre for Health Innovation Richard Ivey School of Business 1151 Richmond St. N London, ON N6A 3K7 January 21, 2013 Dr Pankaj Gupta Partner Taurus Glocal Consulting Dear Dr. Gupta, On behalf of the Ivey International Centre for Health Innovation, it is our pleasure to extend to you a warm welcome to the position of a Health Innovator-in-Residence (HIR). The Centre’s Health Innovators-in-Residence are an integral part of our strategy to deliver on our mandate - preparing health leaders who can identify, assess and facilitate the adoption of innovative health care technologies, systems and processes that will make real change for health care providers, patients and the health care system. You are joining a group of accomplished and renowned colleagues and peers, representing a broad cross-section of the health sector in Canada and around the world, all of whom are committed to promoting innovative solutions to the challenges facing our health care system. We welcome your involvement based on your expertise, interest, time and ability. HIRs are advisors, ambassadors and critical sources of influence and impact. They help shape the future of the health sector nationally and globally. Enclosed you will find: a copy of the HIR Orientation Package, a brief background document on the Centre, and an overview document on our Health Innovation Projects. I look forward to speaking with you; however, should you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact our Executive Director, Lori Turik at 416-407-5262 or by email at lturik@ivey.ca. We look forward to working with you, Dr. Gupta. Sincerely, Dr. Anne Snowdon Chair, International Centre for Health Innovation Richard Ivey School of Business
  3. 3. 3 | P a g e Release FOR VALUABLE CONSIDERATION, the receipt and sufficiency of which are hereby acknowledged, and intending to be legal bound, I hereby grant Richard Ivey School of Business, together with its affiliates, directors, officers, agents, representatives, employees and assigns (collectively, “Ivey”), the absolute and irrevocable right to use quotes, videotape, sound recordings, live productions, photographs and likenesses of, or made by, me (including my name) (the “Materials”) during my term as a Health Innovator in Residence. I hereby acknowledge that the right granted to Richard Ivey School of Business herein includes, without limitation, the right to record, tape, reuse, display, distribute, transmit, alter without restriction or otherwise exploit the Materials, in whole or in part, either digitally, in print, in television, on the Internet or in any other medium now or hereafter known, for any purpose whatsoever and without restriction and without compensation of any kind whatsoever. I hereby waive all rights of inspection or approval regarding any use of the Materials. I hereby release and discharge Richard Ivey School of Business from any and all claims and demands arising out of or in connection with the use of the Materials, including, without limitation, any and all claims for invasion of privacy, right of publicity or defamation. I confirm that I have read the forgoing, I fully understand its contents and I am signing this Release voluntarily. DATED this ____ day of _______ 2013. WITNESS RELEASE: By: ___________________________ By: ________________________________ Name: _________________________ Name: _____________________________
  4. 4. 4 | P a g e Table of Contents Release..........................................................................................................................................................3 Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................5 Centre Activities............................................................................................................................................6 HEALTH INNOVATION PROJECTS ..............................................................................................................6 Centre Activities............................................................................................................................................8 EDUCATIONAL COURSES...........................................................................................................................8 INFORMATION DISSEMINATION...............................................................................................................8 Centre Activities............................................................................................................................................9 THOUGHT LEADERSHIP.............................................................................................................................9 Health Innovators-in-Residence..................................................................................................................10 ROLE........................................................................................................................................................10 QUALIFICATIONS.....................................................................................................................................10 COMMITMENT........................................................................................................................................10 Centre Contact Information........................................................................................................................11
  5. 5. 5 | P a g e Introduction The International Centre for Health Innovation (“the Centre”), established in 2009, is situated within the Richard Ivey School of Business at The University of Western Ontario. The Centre is dedicated to being a catalyst for a health system that is sustainable, productive and embraces innovation. The Centre: 1. Develops leadership capacity through educational and leadership development programs targeting current and future leaders in the health system, 2. Emphasizes education that equips students and program participants with the ability to identify, understand, embrace and implement innovation in real business situations, 3. Empowers and builds collaborative partnerships between government, industry, health stakeholders, researchers and funders to drive innovation adoption, 4. Supports and disseminates knowledge and evidence that our leaders need to embrace innovation, drive change and improve the productivity of our health care system and of our economy.
  6. 6. 6 | P a g e Centre Activities H E A L T H I N N O V A T I O N P R O J E C T S OVERVIEW The Health Innovation Project (HIP) is a cutting-edge learning approach offered by the Centre. It provides valuable, first-hand experience to Ivey students who are passionate about contributing to the success of businesses at the forefront of innovation in the health sector. In doing so, HIPs prepare young leaders to facilitate the adoption of innovative technologies, process and management systems. As part of Ivey’s core requirements, over the course of six months each year, teams of five to six students from the HBA and MBA stream develop a business plan for an innovative idea, study an existing strategic issue with an organization or implement a new theoretical concept. With access to the support and supervision of top industry experts, including Ivey faculty and executive subject matter experts (Health Innovators-in-Residence), HIPs allow students to apply the business thinking learned in the classroom to the creation of innovative and sustainable solutions at the forefront of the health sector. There are five types of HIPs, they include: Health Consulting Projects (HCP) Based on the Ivey Consulting Project (ICP) model*, Health Consulting Projects allow established organizations in the health sector to receive consulting services from students with a variety of business skill sets. These projects help students develop global business capabilities by allowing them to tackle real problems with executives in the health sector using analysis such as pharma-economics, patient quality-of-care and government health policy regulations. The recommendations made by the students are delivered to the partnering organization as detailed business-plans and presentations. Past clients include: SickKids International, Phillips Medical Systems and 3M Canada. * http://www.ivey.uwo.ca/icp/ Health Venture Projects (HVP) The HVP is a specialized entrepreneurial-focused, team-based consulting project that takes students through the process of refining an idea for a start-up company, researching and analyzing their opportunities, writing a detailed business-plan and reporting the findings to the company executives. These projects provide students with the opportunity to apply their business knowledge to the identification and development of a commercial enterprise. In contrast to Ivey’s New Venture Projects (NVP), HVPs are not student-derived entrepreneurial business ideas, but rather a HIP sourced from a young start-up company. MSc/CEMS Business Projects (January to April) These projects are much like the Health Consulting Projects with an international outlook. Many CEMS* students are visiting us from abroad and are enrolled in the Master of Science in Management (MSc) program at Ivey. These talented students have typically achieved the 80th percentile or higher at their previous academic institutions and are preparing to launch a career into the ever-evolving, international business world.
  7. 7. 7 | P a g e * Previously called the Community of European Management Schools, CEMS has now grown to become the Global Alliance in Management Education and is a cooperation of the world’s leading business schools and universities with multinational companies and NGOs. EMBA Executive Client Field Projects Helping companies with real strategic business issues is the cornerstone of the Executive Client Field Project. Working with executives and a faculty advisor, Executive MBA students tackle complex, cross- enterprise issues from the perspective of an executive leader and often come up with creative solutions that have significant payoffs. Health sector projects are an option for EMBA students. Demonstration Projects In order to help implement health innovations to build Canada’s entrepreneurial advantage, the International Centre for Health Innovation collaborates with private sector companies, entrepreneurs and health care institutions to identify, assess, and assist with the commercialization of innovative health care technologies, systems and processes. The Centre creates a platform where a team of students, faculty, HIRs and industry partners demonstrate the effectiveness of a new product or process in a real-world setting. By understanding the effects of a new concept or product on a small scale, implications can be drawn to formulate an effective strategy for post-pilot implementation in larger markets. Teams working on Demonstration Projects will be expected to move beyond the strategic proposals into the delivery stages of the project. Various aspects of the proposals will be placed into action and assessed using quantitative performance metrics. Implications will be drawn from the results of these projects to enable our partners to make future decisions for broader implementation strategies. Interacting with various stakeholders during the course of the project, students will learn about the complexities of the health care environment and the challenges faced when executing new practices in an established system. The Centre provides each Demonstration Project team with a dedicated project facilitator. This enables the study to be sustainable over long periods of time with smooth and effective transitions between cohorts of students. The cycling of teams will ensure that fresh perspectives are used to provide progressive analysis for our partnering organizations. HIPs Overview Health Consulting Projects (HCP) Based on the ICP model, teams of five to six HBA or MBA students work with a well-established company to address a particular issue, problem or opportunity within the health sector. Health Venture Projects (HVP) Based on the ICP model, teams of five to six HBA or MBA students work with a start-up company to address a particular issue, problem or opportunity within the health sector. This project has an entrepreneurial focus. MSc/CEMS Projects These projects allow Ivey MSc and CEMS students visiting from abroad to work in teams towards helping an international health care organization solve an existing strategic issue.
  8. 8. 8 | P a g e Executive Client Field Projects EMBA These projects are restricted to EMBA students. They allow for the opportunity to scope out, analyze and solve a cross-enterprise health care related issue. Demonstration Projects (DEMO) These are larger-scale Centre-led projects in which teams transform innovation from theory into practice for prominent organizations. These projects have a focus on innovation adoption and implementation. Centre Activities E D U C A T I O N A L C O U R S E S The Ivey MBA Health Sector Stream Founded in 2003, the Ivey MBA Health Sector Stream is the core program of the Centre. It is a well- established and renowned program that is proud of its record of developing leaders ready to take on the tough challenges in health care. With the health sector accounting for up to 12% of Canada’s economy, this program has proven a popular one among students looking to enter the health care field or to round-out their life-sciences education. Our twelve-month program utilizes case-based learning within a specialized health sector curriculum that focuses on three courses, in addition to the core curriculum that all Ivey MBAs must undertake. Honors Business Administration Elective The Centre offers a health sector elective course for senior level students in the Honors Business Administration program at the Richard Ivey School of Business. Business for Medical Students Elective The Centre is currently working to develop a fourth year elective course for medical students at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry featuring business knowledge, with particular focus on innovation, commercialization and adoption in the health sector. Customized programs With a wide variety of educational modules, the Centre is capable of tailoring courses to individual organizations or groups of decision-makers. As the Centre moves forward, it is expected that a number of additional executive development programs will be developed. I N F O R M A T I O N D I S S E M I N A T I O N Case Study Development Since Ivey’s inception in 1922, the case study method has been the keystone of the school’s approach to learning. The case method allows students to learn by doing. Each case provides the student with an opportunity to stand in the shoes of the decision-maker, analyzing the business issue presented, making judgments and determining a course of action. Ivey is the only school in Canada that adheres to the case study method. The Centre is dedicated to producing teaching cases that focus on health sector organizations, with particular emphasis on instances of innovation, commercialization and adoption.
  9. 9. 9 | P a g e Social Media The Centre utilizes a variety of social media platforms to allow individuals who share an interest in the health innovation and adoption space to connect, including Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. This network will foster greater understanding of the innovation adoption process and facilitate partnerships. Innovatexchange The Centre has built an Innovation Map of Canada that provides a snapshot of trends and achievement in health innovation that are happening across the country. This online resource can be used to promote knowledge translation and best practices across jurisdictions. Visit www.innovatechange.ca to explore the tool first-hand. Centre Activities T H O U G H T L E A D E R S H I P Ivey Global Health Conference In November of each year, the Centre hosts the Ivey Global Health Innovation Conference in Toronto. This conference brings together leaders in both academia and industry to discuss best practices in health innovation and adoption. In addition, those leaders bring forward their thoughts on the most important areas in which the Centre can focus its resources to create meaningful change. Student participation in the conference allows for it to also function as a learning platform. Academic Research Initiatives The Centre engages in academic research initiatives that support the creation of knowledge which will improve health innovation and adoption. White Papers Faculty and Postdoctoral Fellows associated with the Centre are commissioned to produce point of view papers aimed at encouraging discussion around health innovation and adoption. We advocate evidence- based decision-making and only disseminate concepts and ideas that have a high degree of validity. Our research is focused on five areas of innovation inquiry: medical devices, information technology, health systems, health finance and pharmaceuticals/biotechnology. Measuring What Matters: The Cost vs. Values of Health Care – November 2012 Strengthening Health Systems Through Innovation: Lessons Learned – November 2011 Transforming Canada into a Global Centre for Medical Device Innovation and Adoption – June 2011 Transforming Canadian Health Care through Consumer Engagement: The Key to Quality and System Innovation – February 2011 Leveraging Information Technologies to Transform and Sustain British Columbia’s Health Care Sector – October 2010 Innovation Takes Leadership – September 2010
  10. 10. 10 | P a g e Health Innovators-in-Residence R O L E The role of a Health Innovator-in-Residence is to provide support to the Centre in the following capacities:  Project Advisor for students completing Health Innovation Projects  Guest Lecturer/Panelist – this could be as an element of one of Ivey’s academic programs or with an audience external to the Ivey School of Business  Contributor to thought leadership and opinion papers  Mentor and Coach – this will involve giving students and young professionals advice, sharing knowledge and facilitating connections with your network  Advocate for the Centre – building external relationships for the Centre that lead to financial and operational partnerships, and participating in recruitment and career management activities Note: Specific tasks will be identified based on interests, expertise, and availability. Q U A L I F I C A T I O N S A Health Innovator-in-Residence at the Centre has the following abilities/qualifications:  Considerable experience working in the health sector with a reputation and track-record of success as a champion of innovation in at least one of the following areas: Health Finance, Information Technology, Biotechnology, Pharmaceuticals, Medical and Assistive Technologies, Health Systems Management, Government (Policy) or Professional Practice  Capacity and willingness to work with both undergraduate and graduate students as a mentor, coach, lecturer and project supervisor C O M M I T M E N T A Health Innovator-in- Residence will be asked to dedicate approximately one day per month attending events or being available to students and researchers to share their experience and expertise. Health Innovators-in-Residence will be asked to be available by phone and email to correspond with Centre staff and students as needed. At all times, staff and students affiliated with the Centre will be respectful of your time. Note: At all times, we will respect that this is a voluntary position and that your time is being given freely and that it is valuable. The term length for a Health Innovator-in-Residence is negotiable.
  11. 11. 11 | P a g e Centre Contact Information WEBSITE http://www.ivey.ca/healthinnovation TWITTER @iveyhealth FACEBOOK http://www.facebook.com/iveyhealth LINKEDIN http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=2454727&trk=anet_ug_hm TELEPHONE 1-519-661-2111 ext. 82582 ADDRESS International Centre for Health Innovation Richard Ivey School of Business University of Western Ontario 1151 Richmond Street N London, Ontario N6A 3K7
  12. 12. 12 | P a g e Appendix A: Advisory Council Comprised of industry leaders and supported by academics, health care practitioners and representatives from the public and private sectors, the Advisory Council will provide strategic advice on both education and research. The Council will assist the Centre with an industry perspective that will help us focus on those projects most worthy of further exploration. The Council also has a critical role in mentoring our students, recruiting top talent to the Centre and communicating the findings of our research. Chair: Mr. Neil Fraser, President, Medtronic of Canada Ltd. & Regional Vice President – Canada, Medtronic Inc. Ms. Bonnie Adamson, President and CEO, London Health Sciences Centre Appendix B: Health Innovators-in-Residence Dr. Peter Armstrong, Chief Medical Officer – Emeritus, HQ, Shriners Hospitals for Children Randal Charlton, Director, Everist Genomics Dr. Lorna Jean Edmonds, Leader, Education Management Dr. Pierre-Gerlier Forest, President, Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation Dr. Victor Han, Professor and Canada Research Chair, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University Philip Hassen, President, International Society for Quality in Health Care/President, Canadian Network for International Surgery Bob Kayser, President, RHK Consulting Inc. Dr. Jo Kennelly, Principal/Owner, Global Health Systems Dr. Peter Kleinstiver, President, Katalyst Professional Services Inc. Dr. Kathleen MacMillan, Professor and Director, School of Nursing, Dalhousie, University Terrence McCool, Director and Vice President, Corporate Affairs (Retired), Eli Lilly Canada Inc. Dr. Tom McGowen, Chief, Radiation Oncology, Credit Valley Hospital Ildiko Mehes, Vice President & General Council, Teva Canada Limited Dr. Sarah Muttitt, Chief Information Officer, Ministry of Health Holdings, Singapore Dr. Andreas Orfanos, Chief Medical Officer, Thrasos Innovation Inc. Dr. Frank Plummer, Chief Science Advisor/Scientific Director General, Public Health Agency of Canada Dr. Jeffrey Scott, Manager, Preclinical Affairs, C.R. Bard, Inc. (Davol) N. Arthur (Art) Smith, President and CEO, GS1 Canada Jeff Skinner, Director, Business Development at SteriMax Inc John Toogood, Consultant, Turning Point Strategies Catarina Versaevel, Independent Management and Health Care Consultant Sharon White, Consultant, Sharon White Solutions Anne Marie Wright, Managing Director, A.M. Wright and Associates Inc.

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