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MARKET ASSESSMENTSLIDES AND INFORMATION © 2012 EARLE HAGER            ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
REMEMBER • “If you don’t know where you are going, you   probably aren’t going to get there.” • “Crossing the Chasm: Marke...
THE BASICS • Everything is about Process                   CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012                    ...
AGENDA •   The Basics •   What is It? •   Product Assessment – Good and Bad Examples •   Defining Your Customers •   The P...
THE BASICS • Define Product • Define Customers                 CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012                ...
VALUE STATEMENT • Eventually, your technology will become part of a   product on the market. • What is the product? • Why ...
DEFINE PRODUCT • Who has the problem? • Who is willing to pay to fix the problem? • What is it worth to fix the problem?  ...
MARKET ASSESSMENT • The market assessment also includes the evaluation   of your ability to enter the market.             ...
TWO STATEMENTS • These two statements will end any discussion of your   idea:     • “I have no competition.”     • “Everyo...
COMMODITY • Is the product a commodity? Both products and   services can be commodities. • Define your market so you will ...
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY     • Do you need protection       in multiple countries?                   CRDF Training Ivano-Fran...
PRODUCT SYSTEM • Is the Product part of a larger system? • Will you be part of a larger product?                   CRDF Tr...
OUR EXAMPLE - WHAT IS IT? • The technology is a smartphone application which   will allow medical staff to scan patient in...
WHAT IS IT? PART ONE • It’s an inexpensive application to be sold online.                   CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk ...
WHAT IS IT? PART TWO • It’s part of a hospital inventory system which allows   the hospital to manage on floor inventory a...
WHAT IS IT? PART THREE • Therefore, it’s part of a hospital information system.   Inventory tracking is part of the orderi...
WHAT IS IT? A SUMMARY • In the first slide, limited. In the second slide and third   slide, your customers are software co...
COMPELLING PROBLEM WITH COST • Problem Definition is Key • Establish interest of listener who will follow your   solution....
COMPELLING PROBLEM WITH                 COST - EXAMPLE •   Administrative time for keying information – 12% •   Lack of ti...
BAD EXAMPLE - COMPELLING                PROBLEM WITH COST • Hospital staff must enter information on patient   medicines o...
DISCUSSION OF HOW PRODUCT IS USED • Demonstrate your knowledge of the business and   the products currently in use • Demon...
DISCUSSION OF HOW PRODUCT                  IS USED - EXAMPLE • Doctors and nurses scan information at patient   bedside • ...
BAD EXAMPLE - NO DISCUSSION OF           HOW PRODUCT IS USED • Nurses scan patient and medical bar codes and   therefore s...
DISCUSSION OF SYSTEMS • Your product is part of a larger system • How the product is implemented and utilized is key   to ...
DISCUSSION OF SYSTEMS - EXAMPLE • The smartphone application uploads a CSV file to   the main hospital IS systems which ca...
BAD EXAMPLE - NO DISCUSSION                     OF SYSTEMS • The smartphone application is a standalone device   and can b...
DOCUMENTATION OF ROI • Definition of the problem leads to definition of the   cost of fixing the problem. • Key step is to...
DOCUMENTATION OF ROI - EXAMPLE • Efficient tracking allows more thorough accurate   billing of products. • More efficient ...
DOCUMENTATION OF              ROI – BAD EXAMPLE • Less administrative time for nurses. • Less nurses and hospital staff re...
NOT EVERYONE IS A CUSTOMER • Startups cannot focus on ‘everyone’ as a target. • Defining targets by a problem area or size...
NOT EVERYONE IS A              CUSTOMER - EXAMPLE •   Targeting 100-500 bed hospitals in the EU •   Larger hospitals have ...
BAD EXAMPLE - EVERYONE                  IS A CUSTOMER • All hospitals give medicine to patients and need to   track the ac...
THERE IS COMPETITION • Competition is necessary – it defines a market which   has needs you can address. • Competition all...
THERE IS COMPETITION - EXAMPLE • Multiple competitors exist in larger IS systems for   hospitals. • There is a low barrier...
BAD EXAMPLE - THERE              IS NO COMPETITION • There are no competitors in this space who are   focusing on the hosp...
IP STRATEGY • IP allows you to mark off a space in the   marketplace for your product. • Without IP, you must create a sal...
IP STRATEGY - EXAMPLE • We have developed a provisional patent   application in conjunction with our attorney. • The produ...
BAD EXAMPLE - NO IP STRATEGY • We have taken no steps to copyright, trademark, or   patent our product line. • We have no ...
INTERNAL EXPERTS AND ADVISORS • Seek external advisors with industry experience. • Experts are critical for networking and...
INTERNAL EXPERTS AND               ADVISORS - EXAMPLE • Key advisor – Herbert von Karajan, former hospital   administrator...
BAD EXAMPLE - NO INTERNAL EXPERTS          OR ADVISORS • We are a team of 5 programmers who have   developed several games...
SALES PROCESS • Critical to all planning • Understand customer targets, length of time to   close sale, time to place orde...
SALES PROCESS - EXAMPLE • Pilot of 1 hospital for beta phase • Target 15 geographical advantageous hospital for   first qu...
BAD EXAMPLE - NO SALES PROCESS • Roll out to 75 new hospitals each quarter • System is self supporting                  CR...
PARTNERSHIPS FOR MANUFACTURING        AND SALES FORCE • As a startup, you have limited resources for   infrastructure. • U...
PARTNERSHIPS FOR MANUFACTURING   AND SALES FORCE - EXAMPLE • We plan to leverage relationships with groups who   already s...
BAD EXAMPLE - CREATE OWN  MANUFACTURING AND SALES FORCE • We will hire a small sales force to contact these   hospitals an...
GOAL FOR END OF SECOND YEAR • Develop a vision for your organization at the end of   the second year. • Include revenue, s...
GOAL FOR END OF SECOND                 YEAR - EXAMPLE • Develop stable business process by mid 2012. • Develop network and...
BAD EXAMPLE - NO GOAL FOR END OF          SECOND YEAR • Continue to grow sales • Add Asia and Middle East to targets in 20...
REALISTIC FINANCIALS • Start from the bottom with planning. • Identify specific customers, action plans, and   expectation...
REALISTIC FINANCIALS • Financial statement included with sales costs and   realistic process and startup costs. • Assumpti...
DEFINE COMPETITION • You always have competition. • Who is your market? Geographic? Vertical? • Are competitors acting ind...
FIND LOCATION OF OPTIMAL MARKET • Geographical Linking of   Markets • After this country,   who is next?                  ...
RESEARCH MARKET • Localization Issues     •   Government Regulation to Import     •   Easy to do in bulk?     •   Process ...
REMEMBER • “The place most crossing-the-chasm marketing   segmentation efforts get into trouble is at the   beginning, whe...
DIFFERENTIATION OF COMPETITION • How you are different • How you are the same                 CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivs...
DEFINE CUSTOMERS • Sales Barriers to Competition     • Relationships in place     • Funding     • How accepted is the tech...
COMPLIMENTARY COMPETITION • Other products in different spaces which will affect   budget decisions • If they don’t spend ...
DEVELOPMENT STATE FOR                  COMPETITORS • On Market • Under Review                  CRDF Training Ivano-Frankiv...
FUNDING SOURCES FOR COMPETITORS     •   Sales     •   Investors     •   Corporate Partners     •   Sales Channels         ...
MARKET SALES FOR COMPETITORS •   Total Sales •   Length of Sales Process •   Optimal time to start selling? •   Optimal ti...
PRICING MODEL •   What Problem does this product solve? •   How much does it cost to fix this problem? •   What is the urg...
PRICING SOLUTION • How short or long term is the fix to this problem? • If licensing, will your customers be willing to sh...
DEFINE CUSTOMERS •   Where are my customers? •   Where do they go? •   What do they have in common? •   When do they make ...
UNDERSTANDING CUSTOMERS •   End Users •   Evaluators, Purchasers •   Decision Makers •   Gatekeepers •   Tire-Kickers     ...
THE GREAT RACE • Key roles explained in terms of a pie fight                   CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012...
END USER • A end user is the person who will use the product • The thrower                  CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk ...
EVALUATOR • An evaluator is the person who will be the first point   of contact in the organization who is responsible for...
INFLUENCER • An influencer is a key person to the evaluator who   will be part of the decision process. • The gentleman in...
PURCHASER • The purchaser is the person responsible for budgets   and purchasing decisions. • Becoming an approved vendor ...
DECISION MAKER • The decision maker is the senior manager who will   have final authority to move ahead with the   project...
GATEKEEPER • The gatekeeper is the administrator or secretary   who will block you from talking to the decision   maker. •...
TIRE KICKER • A tire-kicker is someone who will waste your time by   having meetings while they have no authority on   the...
FOR OUR TECHNOLOGY • User – Nurse • Evaluator – Hospital Administrator • Influencer – Accounting Department, Medical Staff...
IN CONCLUSION …
FINAL EXAMINATION • You should be able to fill out the information on the   following slides about your idea and technolog...
INFORMATION ON YOUR              TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 1CompanyInnovatorAddressPhoneEmailWebsiteEvaluationReviewerDateType of ...
INFORMATION ON YOUR               TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 2Definition of the           This section is to be filled out by the i...
INFORMATION ON YOUR                 TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 3Status of theTechnologyPrototype or Market     Description of the p...
INFORMATION ON YOUR              TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 4Technology SystemsDescribe first and       Product will be part of lar...
INFORMATION ON YOUR               TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 5Commercialization         What is the path to the marketplace?Process...
INFORMATION ON YOUR              TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 6Definition of theMarketDevelopment Stage of New, mature market, commod...
GOOGLE • Search Google for examples of your technology or   similar ideas                 CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk an...
INFORMATION ON YOUR                  TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 7 • Google Search Topic 1:     • Results • Google Search Topic 2:  ...
INFORMATION ON YOUR               TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 8Overall Comments on                                       RankingTech...
THANK YOU •   Earle Hager •   Managing Partner, The Neutrino Donut, LLC •   Commercialization of Science and Technology • ...
QUESTIONS?
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Market Assessment Final

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Planning your Business Strategy - Defining your product in terms of the marketplace.

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Market Assessment Final

  1. 1. MARKET ASSESSMENTSLIDES AND INFORMATION © 2012 EARLE HAGER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
  2. 2. REMEMBER • “If you don’t know where you are going, you probably aren’t going to get there.” • “Crossing the Chasm: Marketing and Selling High- Tech Products to Mainstream Customers or simply Crossing the Chasm 1991, revised 1999), Geoffrey A. Moore CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 2 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  3. 3. THE BASICS • Everything is about Process CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 3 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  4. 4. AGENDA • The Basics • What is It? • Product Assessment – Good and Bad Examples • Defining Your Customers • The Pie Fight and how it relates to Customers • Conclusion • Lots of Forms CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril, 2012 4 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  5. 5. THE BASICS • Define Product • Define Customers CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 5 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  6. 6. VALUE STATEMENT • Eventually, your technology will become part of a product on the market. • What is the product? • Why buy the product? • What is your value to each part of the product chain? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 6 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  7. 7. DEFINE PRODUCT • Who has the problem? • Who is willing to pay to fix the problem? • What is it worth to fix the problem? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 7 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  8. 8. MARKET ASSESSMENT • The market assessment also includes the evaluation of your ability to enter the market. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 8 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  9. 9. TWO STATEMENTS • These two statements will end any discussion of your idea: • “I have no competition.” • “Everyone in the world is my potential customer.” CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 9 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  10. 10. COMMODITY • Is the product a commodity? Both products and services can be commodities. • Define your market so you will be first or number one in your market. This is how you differentiate. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 10 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  11. 11. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY • Do you need protection in multiple countries? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 11 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  12. 12. PRODUCT SYSTEM • Is the Product part of a larger system? • Will you be part of a larger product? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 12 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  13. 13. OUR EXAMPLE - WHAT IS IT? • The technology is a smartphone application which will allow medical staff to scan patient information and medications and upload them to the patient accounting system via hospital Wi-Fi. • Cost savings will be found in more efficient inventory tracking and more accurate patient billing. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 13 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  14. 14. WHAT IS IT? PART ONE • It’s an inexpensive application to be sold online. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 14 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  15. 15. WHAT IS IT? PART TWO • It’s part of a hospital inventory system which allows the hospital to manage on floor inventory as well as managing the ordering process. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 15 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  16. 16. WHAT IS IT? PART THREE • Therefore, it’s part of a hospital information system. Inventory tracking is part of the ordering and patient billing process. The more efficient this process, the more efficient the billing process. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 16 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  17. 17. WHAT IS IT? A SUMMARY • In the first slide, limited. In the second slide and third slide, your customers are software companies which sell hospital information system, hospital administration groups, and other groups which need to track inventory and billing. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 17 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  18. 18. COMPELLING PROBLEM WITH COST • Problem Definition is Key • Establish interest of listener who will follow your solution. • Assume listener is knowledgeable in your business area. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 18 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  19. 19. COMPELLING PROBLEM WITH COST - EXAMPLE • Administrative time for keying information – 12% • Lack of timely inventory management • More efficient order management • More accurate patient billing CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 19 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  20. 20. BAD EXAMPLE - COMPELLING PROBLEM WITH COST • Hospital staff must enter information on patient medicines on a regular basis • Time savings from use of scanning system • Less mistakes • Everyone has a smart phone CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 20 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  21. 21. DISCUSSION OF HOW PRODUCT IS USED • Demonstrate your knowledge of the business and the products currently in use • Demonstrate why your idea is an improvement on the current systems • Justify why your solution is unique or protected by patent CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 21 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  22. 22. DISCUSSION OF HOW PRODUCT IS USED - EXAMPLE • Doctors and nurses scan information at patient bedside • Synchronization occurs automatically on predefined intervals or events • In the event a bar code is unreadable, the information will be manually reentered at the nurses’ station CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 22 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  23. 23. BAD EXAMPLE - NO DISCUSSION OF HOW PRODUCT IS USED • Nurses scan patient and medical bar codes and therefore save time using our system CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 23 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  24. 24. DISCUSSION OF SYSTEMS • Your product is part of a larger system • How the product is implemented and utilized is key to your success • Your understanding of systems demonstrates your knowledge of the business issues CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 24 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  25. 25. DISCUSSION OF SYSTEMS - EXAMPLE • The smartphone application uploads a CSV file to the main hospital IS systems which can be imported. • The application uses the hospital Wi-Fi for communications. • By scanning patient medicine bar codes, there will be no requirement to download information, only uploading data. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 25 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  26. 26. BAD EXAMPLE - NO DISCUSSION OF SYSTEMS • The smartphone application is a standalone device and can be used with any hospital information system. • It reads all bar codes. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 26 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  27. 27. DOCUMENTATION OF ROI • Definition of the problem leads to definition of the cost of fixing the problem. • Key step is to identify the groups who have the problem and can justify spending to fix the problem. • ROI includes the cost of not fixing the problem, which is an option. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 27 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  28. 28. DOCUMENTATION OF ROI - EXAMPLE • Efficient tracking allows more thorough accurate billing of products. • More efficient tracking of administrative costs / overhead associated with the product. • Updated inventory management allows for more efficient order quantities and floor stocking. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 28 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  29. 29. DOCUMENTATION OF ROI – BAD EXAMPLE • Less administrative time for nurses. • Less nurses and hospital staff required. • Low cost to enter information. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 29 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  30. 30. NOT EVERYONE IS A CUSTOMER • Startups cannot focus on ‘everyone’ as a target. • Defining targets by a problem area or size allows you to allocate resources for specific groups. • Building on successes at one customer will allow you to use their testimonial at similar customers. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 30 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  31. 31. NOT EVERYONE IS A CUSTOMER - EXAMPLE • Targeting 100-500 bed hospitals in the EU • Larger hospitals have their own systems • Smaller hospitals will not see the ROI • There are 252 hospitals in the EU who fit our profile CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 31 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  32. 32. BAD EXAMPLE - EVERYONE IS A CUSTOMER • All hospitals give medicine to patients and need to track the accounting. • We need to cover all hospitals. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 32 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  33. 33. THERE IS COMPETITION • Competition is necessary – it defines a market which has needs you can address. • Competition allows you to define your solution in terms of options on the market. • Competition allows you to develop a sales strategy in terms of products already in the marketplace. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 33 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  34. 34. THERE IS COMPETITION - EXAMPLE • Multiple competitors exist in larger IS systems for hospitals. • There is a low barrier to entry in the development of smartphone applications. • Under current billing processes, hospitals may not have a compelling reason to implement the system. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 34 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  35. 35. BAD EXAMPLE - THERE IS NO COMPETITION • There are no competitors in this space who are focusing on the hospital market. • It is difficult to create systems which solve the problem we have described. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 35 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  36. 36. IP STRATEGY • IP allows you to mark off a space in the marketplace for your product. • Without IP, you must create a sales / marketing advantage for your product. • Both models will work. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 36 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  37. 37. IP STRATEGY - EXAMPLE • We have developed a provisional patent application in conjunction with our attorney. • The product is a sales / marketing play and we will be developing the name brand by trademarks and web site reservations. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 37 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  38. 38. BAD EXAMPLE - NO IP STRATEGY • We have taken no steps to copyright, trademark, or patent our product line. • We have no strategy to create a name brand for products which are a sales / marketing play. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 38 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  39. 39. INTERNAL EXPERTS AND ADVISORS • Seek external advisors with industry experience. • Experts are critical for networking and introductions, not just advice. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 39 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  40. 40. INTERNAL EXPERTS AND ADVISORS - EXAMPLE • Key advisor – Herbert von Karajan, former hospital administrator, Berlin Philharmonic Hospital. • Beta site – Staff members of the PDQ Bach Hospital, Warsaw, Poland have agreed to help evaluate the product during the pre-beta and beta stages. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 40 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  41. 41. BAD EXAMPLE - NO INTERNAL EXPERTS OR ADVISORS • We are a team of 5 programmers who have developed several games for the iPhone and Android phone. • Sales are small but we have demonstrated our ability to create and sell the game. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 41 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  42. 42. SALES PROCESS • Critical to all planning • Understand customer targets, length of time to close sale, time to place orders, time to supply, time to receive payment. • From the initial contact, this can be 6-9 months on a successful sale. • Establish plan which allows you to survive between the sale and payment. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 42 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  43. 43. SALES PROCESS - EXAMPLE • Pilot of 1 hospital for beta phase • Target 15 geographical advantageous hospital for first quarter • Develop sales plan for additional 100 hospitals for 2011 • Advance sales plan for additional 100 hospitals in 2012-2013 CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 43 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  44. 44. BAD EXAMPLE - NO SALES PROCESS • Roll out to 75 new hospitals each quarter • System is self supporting CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 44 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  45. 45. PARTNERSHIPS FOR MANUFACTURING AND SALES FORCE • As a startup, you have limited resources for infrastructure. • Use contract manufacturing and determine the point in sales when it is feasible to develop your own manufacturing. • Use relationships with complementary sales organizations to move product. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 45 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  46. 46. PARTNERSHIPS FOR MANUFACTURING AND SALES FORCE - EXAMPLE • We plan to leverage relationships with groups who already sell to hospitals in our target market. • We plan to interface with other hospital IS systems and become key partners to these organizations. • For manufacturing, we have identified contract manufacturers. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 46 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  47. 47. BAD EXAMPLE - CREATE OWN MANUFACTURING AND SALES FORCE • We will hire a small sales force to contact these hospitals and sell the product. • If there is manufacturing, we will need to build our own plant. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 47 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  48. 48. GOAL FOR END OF SECOND YEAR • Develop a vision for your organization at the end of the second year. • Include revenue, staffing, customer base. • Develop implementation plan backwards from that point and create milestones. • Stay focused on goals. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 48 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  49. 49. GOAL FOR END OF SECOND YEAR - EXAMPLE • Develop stable business process by mid 2012. • Develop network and relationships for growth with revenue target of $1.5M US. • Anticipated sales to 175 hospitals by late 2013 with staffing levels of 15 people for sales, support, administration, and development. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 49 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  50. 50. BAD EXAMPLE - NO GOAL FOR END OF SECOND YEAR • Continue to grow sales • Add Asia and Middle East to targets in 2013 CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 50 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  51. 51. REALISTIC FINANCIALS • Start from the bottom with planning. • Identify specific customers, action plans, and expectations for closures. • Assign probabilities to unknowns. • Create realistic growth plan. • Do not create expectations of controlling a percentage of the market without putting a name to the customers. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 51 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  52. 52. REALISTIC FINANCIALS • Financial statement included with sales costs and realistic process and startup costs. • Assumptions noted in revenue cost calculations. • Justifications for assumptions along with explanations of issues which would affect the financials. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 52 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  53. 53. DEFINE COMPETITION • You always have competition. • Who is your market? Geographic? Vertical? • Are competitors acting individually or moving together? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 53 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  54. 54. FIND LOCATION OF OPTIMAL MARKET • Geographical Linking of Markets • After this country, who is next? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 54 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  55. 55. RESEARCH MARKET • Localization Issues • Government Regulation to Import • Easy to do in bulk? • Process for importation? • Tariffs or favoritism to local products? • Directions / Labels / Manual in correct grammar? • Government Regulations to Sell • Local taxes and business establishment CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 55 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  56. 56. REMEMBER • “The place most crossing-the-chasm marketing segmentation efforts get into trouble is at the beginning, when they focus on a target market or a target segment instead of on a target customer.” • From Crossing the Chasm CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 56 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  57. 57. DIFFERENTIATION OF COMPETITION • How you are different • How you are the same CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 57 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  58. 58. DEFINE CUSTOMERS • Sales Barriers to Competition • Relationships in place • Funding • How accepted is the technology in the marketplace? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 58 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  59. 59. COMPLIMENTARY COMPETITION • Other products in different spaces which will affect budget decisions • If they don’t spend money on you, where else will they spend it? • When drug companies introduce new products, insurance companies need to determine reimbursement rates and hospitals must adjust their budgets and make decisions on purchasing other medications or treatments. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 59 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  60. 60. DEVELOPMENT STATE FOR COMPETITORS • On Market • Under Review CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 60 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  61. 61. FUNDING SOURCES FOR COMPETITORS • Sales • Investors • Corporate Partners • Sales Channels CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 61 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  62. 62. MARKET SALES FOR COMPETITORS • Total Sales • Length of Sales Process • Optimal time to start selling? • Optimal time to close? • Is the market open for competitors? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 62 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  63. 63. PRICING MODEL • What Problem does this product solve? • How much does it cost to fix this problem? • What is the urgency to fix this problem? • What is the urgency to fix competitive problems? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 63 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  64. 64. PRICING SOLUTION • How short or long term is the fix to this problem? • If licensing, will your customers be willing to share the data? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 64 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  65. 65. DEFINE CUSTOMERS • Where are my customers? • Where do they go? • What do they have in common? • When do they make their buying decision? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 65 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  66. 66. UNDERSTANDING CUSTOMERS • End Users • Evaluators, Purchasers • Decision Makers • Gatekeepers • Tire-Kickers CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 66 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  67. 67. THE GREAT RACE • Key roles explained in terms of a pie fight CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 67 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  68. 68. END USER • A end user is the person who will use the product • The thrower CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 68 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  69. 69. EVALUATOR • An evaluator is the person who will be the first point of contact in the organization who is responsible for considering new technologies or changes and will make recommendations to others in the organization. • The cast will evaluate the product. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 69 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  70. 70. INFLUENCER • An influencer is a key person to the evaluator who will be part of the decision process. • The gentleman in white will not throw pies or be hit by one, but will influence the choices. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 70 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  71. 71. PURCHASER • The purchaser is the person responsible for budgets and purchasing decisions. • Becoming an approved vendor is a critical step. • The director and crew will make the decision on what and how much to buy. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 71 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  72. 72. DECISION MAKER • The decision maker is the senior manager who will have final authority to move ahead with the project. • The director is the final decision maker. He also gets to throw a few pies at the cast. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 72 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  73. 73. GATEKEEPER • The gatekeeper is the administrator or secretary who will block you from talking to the decision maker. • If you ask these folks, you will get nowhere in the buying process. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 73 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  74. 74. TIRE KICKER • A tire-kicker is someone who will waste your time by having meetings while they have no authority on the project. • Two characters not in the scene will not help you. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 74 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  75. 75. FOR OUR TECHNOLOGY • User – Nurse • Evaluator – Hospital Administrator • Influencer – Accounting Department, Medical Staff, Insurance Companies • Purchaser – Developer of Hospital Information System, Application Store, Purchasing Department • Decision Maker – Hospital Administration, Product Development at Hospital Software Group • Tire Kicker – Anyone who is there for the free coffee and snacks CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 75 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  76. 76. IN CONCLUSION …
  77. 77. FINAL EXAMINATION • You should be able to fill out the information on the following slides about your idea and technology. CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 77 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  78. 78. INFORMATION ON YOUR TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 1CompanyInnovatorAddressPhoneEmailWebsiteEvaluationReviewerDateType of Interview (InPerson/Skype/Phone) CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 78 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  79. 79. INFORMATION ON YOUR TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 2Definition of the This section is to be filled out by the initialTechnology reviewer. The definition is a short summary of the technology.Problem the Technology The problem should be defined as one whichSolves has financial impact and therefore, has value in solving the problem.Existing Solutions to Solutions include current technologies as wellProblem as the option of not solving the problem.Competitors Competitors include direct product competitors as well as alternative solutions or projects which compete for budget dollarsAdvantages of Is there a market advantage?Technology over ExistingSolutions and Competitors CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 79 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  80. 80. INFORMATION ON YOUR TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 3Status of theTechnologyPrototype or Market Description of the product statusReady VersionsStatus of Local IPProtectionStatus of Global IPProtectionIP Barriers to Market Are existing patents affecting theEntry technology? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 80 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  81. 81. INFORMATION ON YOUR TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 4Technology SystemsDescribe first and Product will be part of larger system whichsecond level systems will be part of additional systemDescribe advantage toproduct as part of thesystemKey System providers Who are the key system competitors?in the marketplaceTargets of System Who are the targets / providers of theProviders system? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 81 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  82. 82. INFORMATION ON YOUR TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 5Commercialization What is the path to the marketplace?ProcessDefine ‘Next Steps’ for What are the innovators seeking –Successful Project partnership, licensing, sales, investment?Resources Required forNext StepsTeam Required for Who are their resources and what will theyNext Steps need to advance the innovation? CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 82 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  83. 83. INFORMATION ON YOUR TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 6Definition of theMarketDevelopment Stage of New, mature market, commodity basedthe Market market?Major Players in the CompetitorsMarketOpportunities for Companies seeking to enter the marketPartnershipBarriers to Market Entry Issues to market entry?Time Frame for Market Requirements to Enter the marketEntry CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 83 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  84. 84. GOOGLE • Search Google for examples of your technology or similar ideas CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 84 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  85. 85. INFORMATION ON YOUR TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 7 • Google Search Topic 1: • Results • Google Search Topic 2: • Results • Google Search Topic 3: • Results CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 85 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  86. 86. INFORMATION ON YOUR TECHNOLOGY – PAGE 8Overall Comments on RankingTechnology 0-5Overall Comments on RankingTeam 0-5Overall Comments on RankingIP 0-5Overall Comments on RankingNext Steps 0-5Overall Comments on RankingOther Issues 0-5Total Score 0 -25 CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 86 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  87. 87. THANK YOU • Earle Hager • Managing Partner, The Neutrino Donut, LLC • Commercialization of Science and Technology • ehager@austin.rr.com • Skype: earle.hager.panidea • +1 512 662 1728 • http://www.linkedin.com/in/earlehager • http://tinyurl.com/6vy4uum CRDF Training Ivano-Frankivsk andApril 2012 87 Dnepropetrovsk © 2012 Earle Hager
  88. 88. QUESTIONS?

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