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PA 509          Organizational         Experience Report                      Amanda Phillips                        Summe...
Table of ContentsList of Acronyms ...........................................................................................
List of AcronymsCWH – Center for Women’s HealthOHSU – Oregon Health and Sciences UniversityPATH for women – Policy Advisor...
Project OverviewOrganizational Setting       Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women is a small non-profit and has ...
The Report Card has been published since 2000. The 5th edition, and most current Report Cardevaluates 34 health status and...
Learning Objectives and TasksObjective #1: Enhance stakeholder identification and management skills          Ensure integ...
   Establish communication channels and processes by creating an outreach and           communications plan that establis...
Objective #4: Develop competencies in strategic planning          Solicit internal stakeholder input for the strategic pl...
Work Processes and Outcomes       My 509 project was to create a strategic plan and an outreach and communications plan to...
Figure 1: Ten Step Strategic Planning ProcessSource: Bryson, J. M. (2004). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit org...
Figure 1 can be summarized into a 10-step process that helped guide our actions throughout the 509project. These steps ide...
Lastly, while developing my project I realized that facilitating meetings and brainstormingsessions would be critical to m...
Figure 2: Stakeholder Analysis Process                                         Stakeholder                                ...
There are some limitations to this method. The websites and reports can be outdated andorganizational interests may have c...
As a result, I conducted a literature review (see Appendix C). Based on the literature reviewI developed a draft list of c...
The group felt that the direct health services providers were of particular importancebecause they have access to qualitat...
The total number of indicators that each organization addressed through its strategic plans or currentprogramming was also...
The literature review mentioned above (and contained in Appendix C) also provides somestakeholder management recommendatio...
dialogue will foster trust, build credibility, and help clarify the coalition’s goals and expectations.To start, PATH for ...
Objective #2: Strengthen Strategic Communication Skills       PATH for women’s strategic plans include supporting two coal...
Figure 3: Strategic Communications Plan Process Map                                       Solicit Internal Buy-in         ...
Solicit Internal Buy-in and Communications Audit       The creation of the strategic communications plan required constant...
I also requested, and received, access to the budgets and financial information for theoutreach division since resource av...
I then used these drafts and the other information from the brainstorming session to createtools, templates, and guideline...
to include facilitating PATH for women’s transition to a website dedicated to its organization. SinceOHSU’s website creati...
Strategic Communication: Outcomes and RecommendationsOutcomes           The public will be better informed and educated ab...
As the organization grows, it would also be best for PATH for women to hire or select oneperson to be the point of contact...
This policy should “outline clear rules around the use of social media… suggested bestpractices around privacy and confide...
Objectives # 3 & 4: Enhance Applied Skills in Situational Analyses andDevelop Competencies in Strategic Planning       As ...
Assess the External and Internal Environment and Strategic Issues       My third objective was to enhance my applied skill...
Next, the strategic planning team used the situational analysis and the underlyingassumptions to help guide them as they d...
During the second meeting the PATH for women staff determined that they did not have thecapacity, financially as well as t...
This strategic plan will be implemented over a three-year period (2012-2015) and successfulimplementation will help PATH f...
BibliographyBrugha, R., & Varvasovszky, Z. (2000). Stakeholder analysis: a review. Health Policy and      Planning, 15(3),...
Schwartz, N. E. (2010). Getting attention nonprofit marketing plan template. Retrieved June 12,      2012, from Getting At...
Appendix A                Organizational Framework                  PATH for                  women                       ...
Anticipated Action Plan                                           (first completed on 6/20/12, last revised 7/10/12)   Ach...
Feedback                              Task(s)              Primary       Other          Start    Completion               ...
Feedback                               Task(s)             Primary           Other           Start      Completion        ...
Feedback                            Task(s)              Primary       Other         Start    Completion                  ...
Feedback                              Task(s)             Primary           Other           Start      Completion         ...
Task(s)               Primary           Other            Start      Completion      Feedback MechanismObjective #5: Integr...
Stakeholder AnalysisAssessment and Analysis of Stakeholders for PATH for women’s Coalition Empowerment and Capacity       ...
Table of ContentsTable of Contents ..........................................................................................
Stakeholder Management: Strategies and Recommendations ......................................................................
IntroductionMichelle Berlin M.D., M.P.H. an Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) physician and researcher,founded ...
Since 2004, the outreach arm of PATH for women has:     Identified key areas in womens health with policy impact and deve...
Scope of the stakeholder analysisBy third quarter 2013, PATH for women would like to forge strategic partnerships with coa...
Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder TableEach stakeholder was scored. The characteristics were assigned a numer...
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509 Organizational Experience

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Final Submissions for my 509 organizational experience. They include: a project/process report, a new organizational chart, a stakeholder analysis, a communications plan, a situational analysis report, and a strategic plan.

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509 Organizational Experience

  1. 1. PA 509 Organizational Experience Report Amanda Phillips Summer 2012 Faculty Advisor: Dr. Kaimanu 509 Faculty Advisor: Dr. Gelmon Field Organization: PATH for womenField Supervisors: Jamie Ross, PhD and Torrie Fields, MPH
  2. 2. Table of ContentsList of Acronyms ................................................................................................................................. iiProject Overview .................................................................................................................................. 1Organizational Setting .......................................................................................................................... 1Learning Objectives and Tasks ............................................................................................................ 3Work Processes and Outcomes ............................................................................................................ 6Objective #1: Enhance Stakeholder Identification and Management Skills ........................................ 9 Stakeholder Identification and Information Gathering.................................................................. 10 Stakeholder Categorization and Creation of a Stakeholder Table................................................. 11 Stakeholder Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder Table ................................................ 13 Stakeholder Management: Recommendations/Implications ......................................................... 14Objective #2: Strengthen Strategic Communication Skills ............................................................... 17 Solicit Internal Buy-in and Communications Audit ...................................................................... 19 Creation of Communication Content, Tools, and Templates ........................................................ 20 Project Coordination...................................................................................................................... 21 Organizational Strategic Communications Plan ............................................................................ 22 Strategic Communication: Outcomes and Recommendations ...................................................... 23Objectives # 3 & 4: Enhance Applied Skills in Situational Analyses and Develop Competencies inStrategic Planning .............................................................................................................................. 26 Identify Organizational Mandates ................................................................................................. 26 Assess the External and Internal Environment and Strategic Issues ............................................. 27 Formulate Strategies to Manage the Issues, Review and Adopt a Strategic Plan, and Develop anImplementation Process ..................................................................................................................... 28 Outcomes and Recommendations ................................................................................................. 29Conclusion.......................................................................................................................................... 30Bibliography ....................................................................................................................................... 31 Page | i
  3. 3. List of AcronymsCWH – Center for Women’s HealthOHSU – Oregon Health and Sciences UniversityPATH for women – Policy Advisory Toward Health for womenPSU – Portland State UniversityWGSS – Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department Intentionally Blank Page | ii
  4. 4. Project OverviewOrganizational Setting Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women is a small non-profit and has threeemployees. They are Michelle Berlin M.D., M.P.H. (Director of Research), Jamie Ross, PhD (Co-Director of Outreach), and Torrie Fields, MPH, Co-Director of Outreach). Michelle Berlin M.D.,M.P.H. an Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) physician, and researcher, foundedPATH for women in 2004. PATH for women was a response to the critical need for current,evidence-based information concerning women’s health for use toward policy implementation andit is now a strategic partnership between the OHSU Center for Women’s Health (CWH) andPortland State University’s (PSU) Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department (WGSS).PATH for women’s revised mission is to provide accurate, high-quality community driven research,data, and analysis to inform women’s health policy and to serve as an independent source of data,analysis, and coalition capacity-building for the public, advocates, and policymakers. PATH for women has expanded from its original emphasis on creating and translatingscientific research to inform women’s health policy to include coalition capacity building andcommunity outreach. As a result, PATH for women has two divisions (see Appendix A). Onefocuses on research and the other focuses on outreach. The outreach division is housed at WGSSand it aims to develop meaningful relationships with interested community members, communityorganizations, public health professionals, educators, and policymakers regarding issues facingwomen in Oregon, such as Women with Diabetes and Women with First Trimester Prenatal Care.The outreach division draws its evidenced-based health related information from the Making theGrade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card (Report Card). Page | 1
  5. 5. The Report Card has been published since 2000. The 5th edition, and most current Report Cardevaluates 34 health status and 68 health policy indicators and assesses progress in reaching keybenchmarks and policy objectives for each state and for the nation as a whole. For example,according to the Report Card Oregon is currently demonstrating a failing grade in two indicators:Women with Diabetes and Women with First Trimester Prenatal Care. The research division is housed in CWH where Michelle is a lead author of theaforementioned Report Card (see http://hrc.nwlc.org/). The research division aims to serve as anational and regional resource for data analysis, including the provision of accurate and currentresearch concerning women’s health and evidence-based analysis of key issues that specificallyaffect efficiency, cost, and outcomes of the health of women. Since 2004, the outreach division ofPATH for women has:  Identified key areas in womens health with policy impact and developed materials for use by community groups, local organizations, and the public to influence policy development and implementation  Interpreted the results of health studies for policymakers, the media, and the public  Analyzed and translated existing evidence-based research for the public and policymakers Intentionally Blank Page | 2
  6. 6. Learning Objectives and TasksObjective #1: Enhance stakeholder identification and management skills  Ensure integrity of the current data on potential stakeholders by querying the database and cross referencing the data with publicly available information  Facilitate brainstorming session with staff to identify additional stakeholders  Perform a literature review to gain a better understanding of feminist stakeholder prioritization methodologies  Categorize stakeholders based on their type and interest in health disparities  Prioritize stakeholders using a unique scorecard that focuses less on power rankings and resource level and more on relationships and those who are most vulnerable to PATH for women’s objectives  Analyze the data and develop recommendations  Write stakeholder analysis report that synthesizes the literature review, key themes, the data analysis, and recommendations  Present report to staffEvidence: Written stakeholder analysis reportObjective #2: Strengthen strategic communication skills  Collaborate continuously with key internal stakeholders to determine requirements and gather past content to develop effective communication materials and strategies  Create and/or edit content for the web and promotional materials including PATH for womens story: the history of the program and a narrative that establishes the need for the program, e-mail communiques, fact sheets, and presentations to help prepare PATH for women to recruit champions and partners and communicate with external stakeholders  Develop a needs assessment and other outreach tools such as invitation letters for an advisory committee and coalitions around diabetes and first trimester prenatal care Page | 3
  7. 7.  Establish communication channels and processes by creating an outreach and communications plan that establishes clear policies on communication practices and procedures, such as outreach efforts (e.g., goals, target audiences, key messages, strategies, tools, intended outcomes, and the means to evaluate results), frequency of communications, brand editorial standards, rules around print and electronic communications, approval for institutional facts and messaging, and expected response for internal and external concerns  Source and manage the efforts of a graphic artist and marketing consultant to design products such as a logo, graphic standards, stationary templates, and communication templates, such as project worksheets  Help facilitate and coordinate PATH for women’s transition to a website dedicated to its organization  Write report synthesizing internal stakeholder engagement efforts and recommendationsEvidence: Strategic communications plan and report, including the recommendations, tools,standards, and a synthesis of internal stakeholder engagement efforts and the website transitionprocessObjective #3: Enhance applied skills in situational analyses  Conduct a literature review and Internet search to find comparable organizations and determine strategies that have been successful for these organizations  Review, revise, and/or develop PATH for womens mission, vision, and values  Facilitate a brainstorming session with PATH for women staff and conduct a SWOT analysis  Draft situational analysis report  Discuss results of SWOT and situational analysis with PATH for women staff and gain feedback  Revise and finalize situational analysisEvidence: The SWOT, situational analysis, and a report summarizing the literature review, and theprocess of developing/revising the mission, vision, and values Page | 4
  8. 8. Objective #4: Develop competencies in strategic planning  Solicit internal stakeholder input for the strategic planning process through facilitated meetings, and gather and review past PATH for women communication with external stakeholders and prior strategic plans  Synthesize results and draft a report  Use the report to craft recommendations for revised goals, strategies, and objectives  Develop a strategic plan and create an action plan including budget, tasks, roles, scheduling, and metrics to reflect accomplishments and adjustments to the PATH for women’s priorities  Solicit additional feedback from PATH for women staff and edit the strategic plan as necessary  Present final strategic plan to PATH for women staffEvidence: Comprehensive strategic plan, including a list of stakeholders, a copy of the presentationmaterials used to communicate the results of the project, and the report synthesizing the strategicplanning processObjective #5: Integrate and apply what has been learned in the curriculum during theorganizational experience, identify future career directions, and articulate potential ongoingprofessional development needs.  Engage in reflection activities through the organizational experience.  Document personal progress toward both career goals and learning objectives  Prepare the required reflective papersEvidence: Reflective paper, portfolio, and presentation slides Page | 5
  9. 9. Work Processes and Outcomes My 509 project was to create a strategic plan and an outreach and communications plan tohelp these efforts. My supervisors were Dr. Jamie Ross, an assistant professor at PSU, and TorrieFields, MPH who are the co- directors and progenitors of PATH for womens outreach andadvocacy division. Therefore, their guidance and input was integral to the success of this 509project and they were required members of the strategic planning work team. I also worked Dr.Berlin, the founder of PATH for women and director of its research division. Dr. Berlin offeredinsight into the origins of the organization and shared her vision for its future. As my 509 project progressed, I had to revise my objectives and tasks. For example, asdiscussed below, PATH for women requested that I apply feminist methodologies and frameworksduring the stakeholder analysis instead of the traditional approaches that I had anticipated. Anothermodification to my initial work occurred after the staff reviewed the drafts of the stakeholderanalysis, strategic plan, and communications plan. They determined that while the analysis andplans were sound, and reflected their initial goal of forming coalitions, that they did not have theorganizational capacity for successful implementation and that poor implementation would reflectpoorly on the organization. As a result, I shifted my focus to creating a framework that allowedPATH for women to support existing coalitions. The revised objectives, work processes, andoutcomes associated with them are as follows. In addition, my initial action plan and a detailedmeeting log are included in Appendix B. At the start of the project, I suggested that we utilize the strategic planning frameworkdescribed by John M. Bryson (2004) in Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations.The work team was amenable so I also adapted the strategic planning worksheets from Bryson’s(2005) Creating and implementing your strategic plan: a workbook for public and nonprofitorganizations. This process framework is captured in Figure 1. Page | 6
  10. 10. Figure 1: Ten Step Strategic Planning ProcessSource: Bryson, J. M. (2004). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: a guide to strengthening andsustaining organizational achievement (3 ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Page | 7
  11. 11. Figure 1 can be summarized into a 10-step process that helped guide our actions throughout the 509project. These steps identified by Bryson (2004) are: 1. Initiate and agree on a strategic planning process; 2. Identify organizational mandates; 3. Clarify organizational mission and values; 4. Assess the external and internal environments to identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats; 5. Identify the strategic issues facing the organization; 6. Formulate strategies to manage the issues; 7. Review and adopt the strategies or strategic plan; 8. Establish an effective organizational vision; 9. Develop an effective implementation process; and 10. Reassess the strategies and the strategic planning process (pp. 33-34).We did not follow these steps verbatim. For example, we believed that it was more beneficial toestablish the vision for PATH for women while we were clarifying its mission and values. Inaddition, the first step “initiate and agree” occurred during the drafting of the project contract.Furthermore, Bryson’s (2004) framework and steps are incredibly dense. I ultimately decided tocreate objective friendly process maps that expanded these 10-steps into actionable andapproachable sequences. Nevertheless, this framework shaped our approach to each of the above-mentioned objectives. Page | 8
  12. 12. Lastly, while developing my project I realized that facilitating meetings and brainstormingsessions would be critical to my success. An Institute for Media, Policy and Civil Societyhandbook; Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations: A Guide To Strengtheningand Sustaining Organizational Achievement by John Bryson; and Strategic Planning for Public andNonprofit Organizations: A Guide to Strengthening and Sustaining Organizational Achievement bySally Patterson and Janel Radtke (2009) helped me conduct these sessions effectively.Objective #1: Enhance Stakeholder Identification and ManagementSkills By third quarter 2013, PATH for women would like to forge strategic partnerships withcoalitions that address two issues: improving the health of women and their children during the firsttrimester, and preventing and improving care for women with diabetes. PATH for women will alignwith these existing coalitions, and support them by assisting with the recruitment of potentialcoalition members, translating research upon request, and training coalition members on how to usequalitative data to support their policy initiatives. PATH for women’s staff plan to identify the appropriate coalitions as part of their duties.Therefore, this stakeholder analysis supports PATH for women’s goal by identifying andprioritizing potential coalition members that PATH for women can recruit for the existingcoalitions. The narrative below outlines the tasks that each group member completed, and figure 2contains a process map. Page | 9
  13. 13. Figure 2: Stakeholder Analysis Process Stakeholder Identification Document and Monitor and Categorize Evaluate Stakeholders Analyze and Engage Prioritze Stakeholders Stakeholders Develop Strategies to Manage StakeholdersStakeholder Identification and Information Gathering The identification and information gathering process was similar to step #2 of the Bryson(2004) framework and it relied on PATH for women’s prior knowledge and secondary information.Specifically, PATH for women previously reviewed organizational websites, advocacy reports, andannual summaries and used the information to create a matrix of organizations that were linked tothe Report Card indicators. I then compiled a list of stakeholders/potential coalition members foreach coalition (see Appendix C) by focusing on organizations that were linked to indicators relatedto each issue. For example, organizations that were linked to the nutrition and obesity indicatorswere included in the list of stakeholders for the diabetes coalition. Next, I reviewed eachorganization’s current strategic objectives and goals to determine if the organization was stillaligned with the issue, and used their website to develop the contact list. Page | 10
  14. 14. There are some limitations to this method. The websites and reports can be outdated andorganizational interests may have changed, but these sources are excellent for an initial report andthis method was most appropriate for PATH for women’s strategic planning timeline. Nevertheless,to increase the efficacy of the stakeholder analysis process PATH for women must integrateadditional steps such as a needs assessment. As a result, the work group developed a needsassessment (see Appendix C) that PATH for women will use in the future to gain primary data onstakeholder interests. PATH for women will also use this data to revise this report and futurestakeholder analyses.Stakeholder Categorization and Creation of a Stakeholder Table First, the work group brainstormed and defined the stakeholder characteristics. Traditionalcharacteristics include resources, power, leadership, and interests (Bryson, 2004a; Bryson, 2004b;Schmeer, 1999). Once these characteristics are defined, stakeholders are then ranked in a tablebased on their positions within these categories. Analytical tools associated with thesecharacteristics include the power versus interest grids, numerical rankings e.g., 3, 2 ,1 with 1 beingnone and 3 being a lot, or the common rankings yes or no and high, medium, low (Bryson, 2004a;Bryson, 2004b; Schmeer, 1999). At this initial work session, PATH for women indicated that such traditional characteristicswere not suitable for its purposes. Instead, PATH for women wanted me to focus on characteristicsthat align with its mission and its values, which incorporate feminist ideologies. In other words,PATH for women wanted a unique scorecard that focuses less on power rankings and resourcelevels, and more on relationships, stakeholder needs, and those who would be affected the most bythe coaltions that they support. Page | 11
  15. 15. As a result, I conducted a literature review (see Appendix C). Based on the literature reviewI developed a draft list of characteristics, and created a stakeholder table. I populated the table withthe identified stakeholders, contact information, and the draft characteristics. For example, based onSchmeer (1999), one of my sources, I categorized the stakeholders into the following sectorsnonprofit (nongovernmental organizations, foundations, grassroots community organizations);commercial/private for profit organizations; and public or government departments or programs.In accordance with Schmeer (1999) I also ensured that stakeholders from differentdepartments/administrative areas and geographic locations were included even if they were from thesame organization. Furthermore, I included sectors research programs and organizations, and tradeassociations. Hospital-based research programs and organizational sectors are important becausestakeholders/potential coalition members, such as the Kaiser Permanente Center for HealthResearch are neither community organizations, nor direct service providers. The trade associationssector was important because some nonprofits are uniquely focused on the needs of theprofessionals who deliver services. These stakeholders help shape healthcare in Oregon, but theyare not tied primarily to a single issue. Lobbying capability/intent was important because some organizations may have theexperience with and the resources to create and advocate for policy positions. These organizationsare also important because they can share their experiences and help guide the consensus buildingand policy development process. The level of reporting/focus was important because anorganization’s grant funding and mission are strongly linked to improving health outcomesassociated with diabetes or first trimester prenatal care would more than likely show a higher levelof interest in becoming a coalition member. Page | 12
  16. 16. The group felt that the direct health services providers were of particular importancebecause they have access to qualitative data e.g., case studies that would help supplement thequantitative and research data that PATH for women can access through its connection with CWH.The size of the organization was important because size affects an organization’s flexibility; itshapes organizational culture and is often times an adequate predictor of organizational capacity.Lastly, a focus on socio-demographic issues is important because the Report Card has demonstratedthat states, including Oregon, have significant health disparities and women suffer from thesedisparities on multiple levels. Furthermore, the overall U.S. female population suffers from lowerhealth outcomes, but women of differing racial/ethnic populations, geographic populations, andsocioeconomic class face even more risks to their health. Reducing these gaps and improving thehealth of all women aligns with PATH for women’s vision. PATH for women’s staff then reviewed a final draft of the suggested table, and ultimatelythe work group agreed to the stakeholder characteristics that are defined in Appendix C. In addition,Appendix C includes instructions for completing the stakeholder table and the populatedstakeholder table. Each of the characteristics defined therein reflect the different roles that thesestakeholders play, and the perspectives they can bring to the coalitions.Stakeholder Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder TableI identified a list of 68 stakeholders for the diabetes coalition and 31 stakeholders for the firsttrimester prenatal care coalition. Each stakeholder was then scored. The characteristics wereassigned a numerical value  Yes = 1 and No = 01  High = 3, Medium = 2, and Low = 11 Except for the rural versus urban category where Yes = 2 and No = 0. Page | 13
  17. 17. The total number of indicators that each organization addressed through its strategic plans or currentprogramming was also added to the individual scores. The sample size was not large enough formore sophisticated statistical analyses. For example, an attempt to take the top 30% of stakeholdersin each category revealed that there is only one trade association, and that all of the governmentorganizations are large organizations. Nevertheless, there are steps that PATH for women could taketo ensure that its initial outreach efforts are balanced. For instance, it would make sense for PATHfor women to invite organizations that may not have been in the top 10 for each issue. For example,stakeholders from rural areas may be of more interest than those from urban areas despite theirscore. A complete analysis of the data is available in Appendix C.Stakeholder Management: Recommendations/ImplicationsThis stakeholder analysis is only valuable if PATH for women leverages the results and creates astakeholder management process. Therefore, stakeholder management should be continual, and thestakeholder analysis should be updated regularly so that PATH for women can continue to identifynew stakeholders, changes to current stakeholders, and new information that current managementefforts produce. The Clarkson Centre for Business Ethics (1999), also outlines seven principles ofstakeholder management that PATH for women should incorporate in its management processes.(See Appendix C for a detailed discussion of these principles). Page | 14
  18. 18. The literature review mentioned above (and contained in Appendix C) also provides somestakeholder management recommendations. A classical view of stakeholder management holds thatit requires “simultaneous attention to the legitimate interests of all appropriate stakeholders, both inthe establishment of organizational structures and general policies and in case-by-case decisionmaking” (Donaldson & Preston, 1995). From a feminist perspective, however, the stakeholdermanagement process focusses less on the legitimacy of interest and centralizing authority andpower. Instead, feminists believe that stakeholder management should be “… about creating valuefor an entire network of stakeholders by working to develop effective forms of cooperation,decentralizing power and authority, and building consensus among stakeholders throughcommunication to generate strategic direction” (Wicks, Gilbert, & Freeman, 1994). Therefore, ifPATH for women intends to incorporate feminist methodologies in its stakeholder managementprocess, PATH for women should focus on ensuring that coalition members form a strong andproductive network (McGuire, 2002). PATH for women should also “care enough for the leastadvantaged stakeholders that they not be harmed; insofar as they are not harmed, privilege thosestakeholders with whom you have a close relationship” (Burton & Dunn, 1996). As a result, I recommend that PATH for women quickly conduct the above referenced needsassessment. This will ensure that PATH for women is aware of, and can attempt to meet the needsof all of its stakeholders not just those with whom the staff have previously communicated or thosewho are selected to become coalition members. PATH for women should also communicatecontinuously with its coalition members and other stakeholders. As McGuire 2002, states“…network management is based on information rather than authority.” Constant communicationwill create transparency and give stakeholders the opportunity to learn about PATH for women.Communication will also ensure that there is a strong relationship among coalition members since Page | 15
  19. 19. dialogue will foster trust, build credibility, and help clarify the coalition’s goals and expectations.To start, PATH for women should host the coalition members, and provide a clear description oftheir roles and responsibilities, and an overview of PATH for women’s objective and the ReportCard. Communications tools and an organizational strategic communications plan are included inAppendix D. PATH for women must also empower its members. PATH for women is uniquely capable ofproviding relevant and timely evidenced-based data to its community members. Furthermore,PATH for women has expertise in translating research into effective programmatic policy, andbridging the information gap between researchers, service providers, and community organizations.Empowering coalition members would require PATH for women to provide access to its resourcesand skills, and train coalition members so that they can develop the capacity to request researchwhen needed and incorporate evidenced-based research in their interventions and advocacy efforts. Additionally, PATH for women should facilitate and promote a shared understanding of theroot causes of the issues and collective approaches to producing efficient and effective policies andinterventions. A coalition, as opposed to individual actors, has a greater chance of creatingsustainable change. Lastly, PATH for women should evaluate its stakeholder engagement andmanagement processes, as well as the outcomes from this initial effort. Some suggestions on how tomeasure the outcomes of communications with stakeholders are in Appendix D. Evaluating theengagement process will allow PATH for women to improve and/or maintain the quality of both itsrelationships with its stakeholders, including coalition leaders. Page | 16
  20. 20. Objective #2: Strengthen Strategic Communication Skills PATH for women’s strategic plans include supporting two coalitions, forming an advisorycommittee, and increasing public awareness of the organization in order to gain credibility withinthe region. Extensive internal and external communication is critical to the attainment of thesegoals, but without effective strategic communication, PATH for women will not be able to recruitcoalition members, nor will PATH for women be able to increase its profile.The term strategic communication “describes the combination of plans, goals, practices, and toolswith which an organization sends consistent messages about its mission, values, andaccomplishments” (Patterson & Radtke, 2009). Therefore, PATH for women needed acomprehensive organizational strategic communications plan and numerous tools and templates toprepare the organization to pursue these goals. Unlike an event specific or announcement-specificplan, an organizational strategic communications plan formalizes PATH for women’s overall policyfor internal and external communication, provides guidance on how to communicate proactivelyand reactively with various audiences, and includes instructions on how to develop and maintainrelationships through clear communications. The process for this objective is described below andshown in Figure 2. Intentionally Blank Page | 17
  21. 21. Figure 3: Strategic Communications Plan Process Map Solicit Internal Buy-in and Communications Audit Revise and Design and Deliver Needs Assessment Improve Process Content and Tools Monitoring Communications Plan Evaluation and MonitoringAdapted from Communcation Partners. (n.d.). Strategic Communication: Communication Partners. Retrieved August 12,2012, from Communications Partners: http://www.communipartners.com/Strategic_Communication.html Page | 18
  22. 22. Solicit Internal Buy-in and Communications Audit The creation of the strategic communications plan required constant dialogue with thePATH for women staff, and initial discussions centered on the scope of the plan. PATH forwomen’s strategic initiatives (coalition building, increasing public awareness) required specificprogram planning. Nevertheless, as we assessed the current state of PATH for women’scommunication capabilities, we quickly realized that PATH for women could not move forwarduntil PATH for women had a clear brand. In other words, PATH for women lacked a clearpersonality, and the tools such as a logo, mission, vision, graphic standards, and cohesive andconsistent messaging, tone, and communication activities that were necessary to establish apersonality. Therefore, PATH for women agreed that I should focus on creating an organizationalstrategic communications plan. Nevertheless, I ensured that the communication products andtemplates from this organizational strategic plan included information that could easily beincorporated into the program specific activities for PATH for women coalition support projects. Next, I asked PATH for women to give me access to its Dropbox where all of its pastcontent such as letters to stakeholders, press releases, organizational capacity descriptions that wereused for grants etc., was housed. Upon receipt, I reviewed these materials so that I could gain abetter understanding of PATH for women, its history, its communications culture, specifically itstone and style, and its past strategies for communicating with the public and stakeholders. Thisinformation provided context and helped shape the communications goals, objectives, and activitiescontained in the organizational strategic communications plan (see Appendix D). Page | 19
  23. 23. I also requested, and received, access to the budgets and financial information for theoutreach division since resource availability determines which communication channels andstrategies are most realistic and appropriate. Lastly, I incorporated portions of the situationalanalysis that I conducted for PATH for women’s strategic plan into the communications plan. Thesituational analysis (which I discuss in detail below) identified internal and external forces thataffect the overall organization. Therefore, I expanded where necessary, to highlight the forces thatwould have the most effect on the communications plan.Creation of Communication Content, Tools, and Templates I facilitated a brainstorming session with PATH for women regarding the message thatthey would like to convey to key stakeholders. We also discussed how they would like to beperceived by the public, and encouraged them to think about terms and phrases that they believedescribe the organization and capture their vision. In addition, we brainstormed what success wouldmean to the organization. Lastly, we brainstormed the mission, vision, and values for theorganization. (These steps are similar to #3 and # 8 of the Bryson (2004) framework). To helpprepare PATH for women for this part of the meeting, I sent the PATH for women staff samples ofmissions, visions, and values, definitions of the terms we would be using, and PATH for women’sold mission statement, that I found in their paperwork. This mission statement was insufficientbecause it focused solely on the research division of the organization. These materials are includedin Appendix D. At the end of the session, we had a revised mission and drafts of the vision andvalues that PATH for women felt comfortable with me using as a basis for the next stage. Page | 20
  24. 24. I then used these drafts and the other information from the brainstorming session to createtools, templates, and guidelines. I created brand editorial standards (see Appendix D) and asdiscussed below the marketing consultant and graphic artist created graphic standards. I alsodeveloped outreach tools such as invitation letters for an advisory committee and coalitions arounddiabetes and first trimester prenatal care (see Appendix D) and other content that could easily beadapted for the PATH for women website.Project Coordination Once it became clear that PATH for women needed templates and othercommunication materials, I altered my objectives to include sourcing and managing theefforts of a graphic artist and marketing consultant. I believed that we needed professionals todesign products such as a logo, graphic standards, stationary templates, and communicationtemplates such as project worksheets. As a result, I approached a contact of mine, a formermarketing executive with extensive experience with academic institutions, and herecommended a graphic artist. Together we created a scope of work and shared it with PATHfor women. PATH for women agreed to the scope and the nominal fee of $200. The scope ofwork and the associated deliverables are included in Appendix E. The marketing consultantand graphic artist then used my notes and the materials from the above referencedbrainstorming session to create their deliverables. My analysis of PATH for women’s communications capacity also revealed that theorganization had to increase its web and social media presence. PATH for women only had a smallbyline on the CWH’s website. I contacted the person responsible for maintaining this page todetermine what if anything we could do to increase PATH for women’s presence. This individualresponded that OHSU has a very strict policy regarding website content and that it would be anextensive undertaking to change the CWH page. Consequently, I revised my tasks for this objective Page | 21
  25. 25. to include facilitating PATH for women’s transition to a website dedicated to its organization. SinceOHSU’s website creation and maintenance process seemed extremely complex, I suggested that wemove the website for the outreach division of PATH for women to the WGSS page at PSU. WGSSagreed and a link to PATH for women’s page will be housed under a new tab on the WGSShomepage dedicated to “Activism.” The research division will still have a presence on the CWHwebsite, but it will now include a link to the new PATH for women webpage, and vice versa.Organizational Strategic Communications Plan Organizational communications plans include the strategic goals that the plan will helpachieve. They also include the target audience(s) and specific outcomes that the plan can achieve;the communication channels, methods, and activities to implement the plans; an exploration of theresources necessary to implement the plan; and tools to evaluation the effectiveness of thecommunications plan (Positioning Public Child Welfare Initiative, 2012; Schwartz, 2010; W.K.Kellogg Foundation, n.d.). (In addition, this portion of the communications planning process issimilar to steps #4, #5, #6, #7, and # 9 of the Bryson (2004) framework). The goals for theorganizational strategic communications plan are outlined above. They were apparent when werealized that PATH for women lacked even the most basic communication materials andcommunications infrastructure. In addition, PATH for women’s strategic goals, which are discussedlater in this report, also shaped the overall goals for the communications plan. The stakeholderanalysis that I conducted for objective #1 and the situational analysis that I conducted for objective#3 helped me identify the target audience. Lastly, the aforementioned brainstorming session andcommunications audit provided the details for the remaining elements of the plan. Once I completeda draft of the strategic communications plan, I submitted it to the PATH for women staff forcomments and approval. Page | 22
  26. 26. Strategic Communication: Outcomes and RecommendationsOutcomes The public will be better informed and educated about PATH for women, and theorganization will increase its public profile. The plan will also improve the quality and effectivenessof PATH for women’s communications, which will then increase the organization’s profile.Increased brand awareness may also lead to increased resources, such as PSU and OHSUdepartmental support and grants which will extend both the reach of the organization and PATH forwomen’s ability to achieve its mission. Also, the plan will facilitate improved allocation ofresources. Furthermore, PATH for women now has enough materials to prepare a press kit, whichusually consists of background material, such as the history of the organization, its mission, vision,values, current collaborators, and information on past successes. PATH for women will also have awebsite that is easy to find and easy to navigate. The website, through Google Analytics will alsoprovide a way for PATH for women to measure the success of its communication activities.Recommendations PATH for women should conduct additional audience definition, segmentation, andprofiling. This exercise will help PATH for women develop messages that will more effectivelycompel its target audiences. This information will also help PATH for women identify events,activities, and communication pathways that the organization can leverage in the future. It may alsoensure that PATH for women efforts to create an advisory committee are successful. PATH forwomen should also establish a dedicated e-mail address for announcements. This dedicated e-mailaddress will also increase the legitimacy of its communication efforts.22 PATH for women has already acted on this recommendation. Its dedicated e-mail address is PATHforwomen@pdx.edu. Page | 23
  27. 27. As the organization grows, it would also be best for PATH for women to hire or select oneperson to be the point of contact for media inquiries and become the communications plan manager.This will allow Torrie Fields to dedicate her time towards direct outreach, program management,planning, and implementation. Until then it makes sense for all PATH for women staff to becomefamiliar with marketing strategies and tactics. There are numerous free or low cost sources forguidance on how to use various communication channels effectively e.g., Guerilla Marketing forNonprofits.3 Furthermore, PATH for women should hire a marketing and social media intern whowould report to Torrie. This would ensure that there is timely-follow up and in times when a swiftreaction is necessary someone is prepared and empowered to deal with the situation. PATH for women should be prepared to allocate about four hours a week, the averageamount time most say they dedicate to marketing and social media (Institute for Media, Policy andCivil Society, 2005). This will ensure that the staff can easily gather and upload content regularly toboth the website and Facebook page, and perform other communications-related duties. Old andinaccurate information will reduce the organization’s credibility, and if the organization fails toproduce timely comments or a position on current events, the organization itself becomes lessrelevant. Moreover, PATH for women should consider adopting a social media policy.3 Levinson, J. C., Adkins, F., & Forbes, C. (2010). Guerrilla marketing for nonprofits: 250 tactics to promote, recruit, motivate,and raise more money. Irvine: Entrepreneur Press. Page | 24
  28. 28. This policy should “outline clear rules around the use of social media… suggested bestpractices around privacy and confidentiality issues, and personal vs. professional or official socialmedia behavior” (Colorado Nonprofit Association, 2011). PATH for women should also develop afundraising or development communications plan. This organizational communications plan willprovide the foundation for the fundraising communications plan since “a developmentcommunications strategy starts with the organization’s overall communications plan … and must bedone in the context of how the organization has decided to present itself to the public” (Poderis,2011). The fundraising communications plan would help PATH for women achieve its strategicgoal of becoming financially sustainable. In addition, PATH for women should expand its portfolio of materials to support itscommunication activities. For example, the staff can convert the new logo and brand statement intopromotional items that the staff can leave behind and giveaway. PATH for women can then testthese new materials with its coalitions and advisory committee. PATH for women could also createan annual report. The annual report would help publicize significant achievements and eventsAnother recommendation is that each invitation to the coalition should be followed by a phone callto verify receipt of the information, answer questions, and if possible arrange an in-person meetingsince in-person meetings increase the chance of successfully gaining support and strengthensrelationships (W.K. Kellogg Foundation, n.d.). Lastly, PATH for women should update itsorganizational strategic communications plan annually and conduct quarterly evaluations of theplan. Page | 25
  29. 29. Objectives # 3 & 4: Enhance Applied Skills in Situational Analyses andDevelop Competencies in Strategic Planning As mentioned above the strategic planning team mainly utilized the framework describedby John M. Bryson (2004) in Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations and thestrategic planning worksheets from Bryson’s (2005) Creating and implementing your strategicplan: a workbook for public and nonprofit organizations to guide the strategic planning process.The process map and the worksheests can be found above, as well as in Appendices F and G.Specifically, these objectives required us to complete and/or reassess steps #2, #4 – #7, and #9 ofBryson’s (2004) framework within the context of a strategic plan. The information contained in theworksheets includes, a SWOT analysis, critical organizational issues, and the underlyingassumptions of the strategic plan development process. This information was then used toarticulate the goals outlined in this plan. Therfore, this plan is a record of the strategic planningprocess and the decisions that the strategic planning team made.Identify Organizational Mandates Step #2 was already completed during the development of the strategic communicationsplan. PATH for women does not have any legislative mandates, but its operations do reflect itsunique history as the result of a strategic partnership between OHSU and PSU. For example,WGSS’ mission is To support feminist scholarship throughout the university; foster student learning of the rich interdisciplinary knowledge within the field of womens studies; develop and implement feminist pedagogy; and support feminist inspired activism both within the university and in the community at large. We are committed to scholarship, learning, and activism that promote a critical understanding of interrelated systems of oppression with the goal of disrupting the resulting imbalances of power.As a result, PATH for women ensures that feminist methodologies inform its processes andprocedures e.g., the unique stakeholder scoring process that PATH for women requested during thestakeholder analysis process. Page | 26
  30. 30. Assess the External and Internal Environment and Strategic Issues My third objective was to enhance my applied skills in situational analysis. As a result,fulfilling the requirements of my objective allowed me to complete step #4 of Bryson’s (2004)strategic planning process. The resulting situational analysis is included in Appendix F. Theprocess for these objectives is described below and shown in Figure 3 below. Situational analysesare meant to “provide information on the strengths and weaknesses of [an] organization in relationto the opportunities and challenges it faces” (Bryson, 2004, p. 124). Therefore, as part of thisprocess, the strategic planning team met and brainstormed information for a SWOT analysis thenidentified and assessed the challenges and opportunities that both the outreach and researchdivisions of PATH for women face. I then drafted the situational analysis using the mission, vision,and values that the strategic planning team had finalized. The situational analysis informed the above organizational communications plan,stakeholder analysis, and its 2012-2015 strategic plans. After PATH for women reviewed a draft ofmy situational analysis they developed a few underlying assumptions (see Appendix G). Theseassumptions are the bridge between the external and internal assessments and the strategic plan. Ifone of these assumptions prove false or the situation changes then the strategic plan must beadjusted to reflect this change. Page | 27
  31. 31. Next, the strategic planning team used the situational analysis and the underlyingassumptions to help guide them as they developed a list of critical strategic issues or questions thatPATH for women must address to be successful within the 2012-2015 planning horizon. Bryson(2004) defines strategic issues as “fundamental policy questions or critical challenges affecting theorganization’s mandates, mission and values, product or service level and mix, clients, users orpayers, cost, financing, structure, processes, and management” (p. 42). The worksheet thatcaptured the strategic issues that PATH for women’s staff identified is in Appendix F. At times, itwas difficult to recall that our strategic planning horizon was in the short-to-medium term (3years), but after a series of e-mails and discussions, we were able to reach a consensus.Formulate Strategies to Manage the Issues, Review and Adopt a Strategic Plan, andDevelop an Implementation Process I reviewed notes and documentation from PATH for women’s 2004 strategic planningworkshop and stakeholder interviews, and shared the relevant information that I discovered withthe other members of the strategic planning team. In addition, the team reviewed the situationalanalysis, which helped outline what PATH for women does well and the environment in which itoperates; the recent stakeholder analysis; and the organization’s revised mission, and new visionand value statements. These documents provided context as the team developed the strategic plan.Due to the time constraints presented by the term of the 509 project, the strategic planning teamcreated goals, strategies, objectives, tactical activities, and assigned responsibilities for these tasksin three back-to-back meetings that were dedicated to these steps. Page | 28
  32. 32. During the second meeting the PATH for women staff determined that they did not have thecapacity, financially as well as time, to pursue its initial strategic goal of building coalitions aroundthe women’s health issues that the Report Card highlights successfully. As a result, the secondmeeting was spent revising the critical issue, goals etc., which were associated with that project.The worksheets, presentations, and templates that were used to facilitate these discussions areincluded in Appendices F and G.Outcomes and RecommendationsThe critical issues that the PATH for women strategic planning team identified are  How do we focus our search for grant funding in order to target "translation" grants and avoid applying for grants that are predominantly for direct services providers and researchers?  How do we gain a foothold in "policy forecasting" for womens health, that is, at the cutting edge of policy development and become a primary source of research data?  What can we do now to increase PATH for women’s visibility even more effectively, beyond the push we made this summer with our website, coalition letters, and advisory committee letters?  What can we do to increase our own research base beyond OSHU, the Report Card, and Healthy People 2020, as well as increase our organizational partnerships?The strategic plan addresses these critical issues and as part of its strategic plan, PATH for womenshall pursue the following strategic goals:  Increase financial sustainability  Become the premier evidenced-based health policy advisory group in Oregon  Increase and maintain brand awareness  Increase PATH for women’s ability to respond to the research needs of its stakeholders Page | 29
  33. 33. This strategic plan will be implemented over a three-year period (2012-2015) and successfulimplementation will help PATH for women take more of a leadership role in the public healthcommunity, explore additional strategic partnerships, and measure its outcomes. In addition, thisstrategic plan will provide a framework by which PATH for women can achieve its mission andwork towards its vision, while embodying its values.Conclusion Overall, this project required me to demonstrate knowledge of researching best practices,organizational development, strategic planning, systems and process creation, collaborativesolutions, economic and financial principles, marketing, community outreach, stakeholderengagement, and strategic communications. This tremendous opportunity also taught me how tomanage a complex project. As a result, I believe that I am even more prepared for a career in healthadministration. Page | 30
  34. 34. BibliographyBrugha, R., & Varvasovszky, Z. (2000). Stakeholder analysis: a review. Health Policy and Planning, 15(3), 239-246.Bryson, J. M. (2004). Strategic planning for public and nonprofit organizations: a guide to strengthening and sustaining organizational achievement (3 ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.Bryson, J. M. (2004). What to do when stakeholders matter. Public Management Review, 6(1), 21-53.Burton, B. K., & Dunn, C. P. (1996). Feminist ethics as moral grounding for stakeholder theory. Business Ethics Quarterly, 6(2), 133-147.Camillus, J. C. (2008, January 1). Strategy as a wicked problem. Harvard Business Review, 86(5), pp. 98-101.Communcation Partners. (n.d.). Strategic Communication: Communication Partners. Retrieved August 12, 2012, from Communications Partners : http://www.communipartners.com/Strategic_Communication.htmlDonaldson, T., & Preston, L. E. (1995). The stakeholder theory of the corporation: concepts, evidence, and implications. The Academy of Management Review, 20(1), 65-91 .Levinson, J. C., Adkins, F., & Forbes, C. (2010). Guerrilla marketing for nonprofits: 250 tactics to promote, recruit, motivate, and raise more money. Irvine: Entrepreneur Press.McGuire, M. (2002). Managing networks: propositions on what managers do and why they do it. Public Administration Review, 62(5), 599-609.Patterson, S. J., & Radtke, J. M. (2009). Strategic communications for nonprofit organization: seven steps to creating a successful plan (2 ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.Poderis, J. B. (2011). Fund-raising planning: developing a communications strategy for the development operation. Retrieved June 13, 2012, from Tony Poderis Raise-funds.com: http://www.raise-funds.com/2004/developing-a-communications-strategy-for-the- development-operation/Positioning Public Child Welfare Initiative. (2012). Communications: Strategy. Retrieved August 9, 2012, from Positioning Public Child Welfare Guidance: http://www.ppcwg.org/communications-strategy.htmlSchmeer, K. (1999). Policy toolkit for strengthening health sector reform. In Stakeholder analysis guidelines . Bethesda, MD: Abt Associates, Inc. Page | 31
  35. 35. Schwartz, N. E. (2010). Getting attention nonprofit marketing plan template. Retrieved June 12, 2012, from Getting Attention: http://gettingattention.org/nonprofit-marketing/nonprofit- marketing-plan-template.htmlThe Clarkson Centre for Business Ethics. (1999). Principles of stakeholder management. Retrieved August 12, 2012, from Rotman School of Business Education: http://www.rotman.utoronto.ca/ccbe/Other/Principles%20of%20Stakeholder%20Manage ment.pdfW.K. Kellogg Foundation. (n.d.). Knowledge center: template for strategic communications plan. Retrieved June 13, 2012, from W.K. Kellogg Foundation: http://www.wkkf.org/knowledge-center/resources/2006/01/Template-For-Strategic- Communications-Plan.aspxWicks, A. C., Gilbert, D. R., & Freeman, R. E. (1994). A feminist reinterpretation of the stakeholder concept. Business Ethics Quarterly, 4(4), 475-497. Page | 32
  36. 36. Appendix A Organizational Framework PATH for women Outreach Research Jamie Ross, PhDMichelle Berlin, MD, MPH Torrie Fields, MPH
  37. 37. Anticipated Action Plan (first completed on 6/20/12, last revised 7/10/12) Achieve Learning Objectives and Submit a Stakeholder Analysis; an Outreach and Communications Plan; a Situational Analysis and A Strategic Plan to PATH For Women in 10 weeks (June 18, 2012 through September 1, 2012) Action Steps Accountability Schedule Objective #1: Enhance Stakeholder Identification And Management Skills Feedback Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion MechanismPre-planning and Review 509 contract Submit action planproject management objectives and discuss project Me PATH for women 6/24/12 6/25/12 that captures expectations discussionStakeholder Submit scrubbed Ensure data integrity Me 6/25/12 7/5/12Identification data for reviewStakeholder Create prioritization and Submit template for Me 6/24/12 6/29/12Analysis categorization template review/approvalStakeholder Submit categorized Prioritize and CategorizeIdentification Me 7/2/12 7/5/12 and prioritized data Stakeholders for review 1
  38. 38. Feedback Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion Mechanism Minutes of Meeting • Finalize prior submissions to all and ifProcess Meeting Me PATH for Women 7/5/12 7/5/12 •Address any concerns necessary revised action planReport and Share report with Analyze data and makeRecommendation(s) Me 7/5/12 7/20/12 PATH for women recommendations staff Objective #2: Strengthen Stakeholder Engagement Skills Send drafts for review/approval to • Review current materialsPATH for women internal • Draft revisions and Me 6/18/12 7/31/12Overview stakeholders incorporate new material (PATH for women staff) Submit for review and approval to •Work with graphic designer toCommunication internal create templates, a logo and Me 6/25/12 7/31/12Templates stakeholders other graphics (PATH for women staff) 2
  39. 39. Feedback Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion Mechanism •Review/develop Submit for review communication procedures and approval toCommunication •Create content for website internal Me 6/25/12 7/31/12Procedures and other outlets stakeholders (PATH for women staff) Get consensus from internal and PATH for women Send finalized externalProcess Meeting(s) Me staff and external 8/1/12 8/10/12 materials to all stakeholders on stakeholders participants communication templates etc. • Outreach and communication Send report to planReport Me 8/11/12 8/18/12 PATH for women •Report staff synthesizing engagement efforts Objective #3: Enhance Applied Skills in Situational Analyses Share information with PATH forResearch Conduct literature review Me 6/18/12 6/25/12 women and receive feedback 3
  40. 40. Feedback Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion Mechanism Share information Conduct internet search for with PATH forResearch Me 6/18/12 6/25/12 analogs women and receive feedbackMission, vision Review, revise and/or Send finalizedand values develop PATH for women’s Me PATH for women 7/5/12 7/20/12 materials to all mission vision and values participants Revise/update currentSWOT and SWOT and situational Submit to PATHsituational analysis and incorporate the Me 6/29/12 7/31/12 for womenanalysis lit review, mission, vision, and values Send revisedProcess Meeting Discuss draft Me PATH for women 8/1/12 8/17/12 materials to all participants 4
  41. 41. Feedback Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion Mechanism Objective #4: Develop Competencies in Strategic Planning Create survey to determine Send survey toSolicit internal and external Me 6/25/12 7/5/12 PATH for womenStakeholder Input advocacy interests for review Survey released;Process Meeting Revise survey Me PATH for women 7/5/12 7/12/12 seek participants • Analyze and synthesizeDetermine Send report to results Me 7/12/12 7/19/12Themes PATH for women • Draft report Use the report to clarify Circulate minutesProcess Meeting program goals and Me PATH for women 7/20/12 7/27/12 and decision points objectives Incorporate prior materials Send draft plan toStrategic Plan and current data into a Me 7/28/12 8/17/12 PATH for women strategic plan 5
  42. 42. Task(s) Primary Other Start Completion Feedback MechanismObjective #5: Integrate and Apply What has been Learned, Identify Future Career Directions, and Articulate Ongoing Professional Development Needs Present strategic plan and circulate revised report to PATH for Review report and solicitProcess Meeting PATH for women 8/17/12 9/1/12 women staff and send feedback Me summary/briefing points to external stakeholders • Reflect and synthesize Submit reflective what I learned throughout paper, portfolio and processReflection Me 6/18/12 9/1/12 presentation slides to • Document progress academic advisor for towards career goals and review learning objectives •Stakeholder analysis report • Outreach and communications plan • Stakeholder Complete 509 Assuming completion of all of the objectives Engagement Report •Situational analysis • Strategic plan • Reflective paper, portfolio & presentationSource: Adapted from The Executive Guide to Operational Planning by George L. Morrisay, Patrick J. Bellow, and Betty Acomb.Copyright 1988. 6
  43. 43. Stakeholder AnalysisAssessment and Analysis of Stakeholders for PATH for women’s Coalition Empowerment and Capacity Building Program Written by: Amanda Phillips, JD, MPH Approved by: Jamie Ross, PhD and Torrie Fields, MPH August 29, 2012 1633 SW Park Avenue, Suite 221, Portland, OR 97207
  44. 44. Table of ContentsTable of Contents ................................................................................................................................................................ iIntroduction ......................................................................................................................................................................... 1Purpose of the Stakeholder Analysis ............................................................................................................................... 2Scope of the stakeholder analysis ..................................................................................................................................... 3Method(s) ............................................................................................................................................................................. 3 Identification and Information Gathering ................................................................................................................. 3 Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder Table ............................................................................................... 4Results ................................................................................................................................................................................... 5 Identification and Categorization ................................................................................................................................ 5 Figure 1: Stakeholder Map ................................................................................................................................... 5 Diabetes Data Analysis .................................................................................................................................................. 6 Figure 2: Frequency of Stakeholders by Size .................................................................................................... 6 Figure 3: Frequency of Stakeholder Group by Type ....................................................................................... 7 Figure 4: Distribution of Research Capacity ..................................................................................................... 7 Figure 5: Distribution of Legislative Capacity .................................................................................................. 8 First Trimester Prenatal Care Data Analysis .............................................................................................................. 9 Figure 6: Frequency of Stakeholders by Size .................................................................................................... 9 Figure 7: Frequency of Stakeholder Group by Type ....................................................................................... 9 Figure 8: Distribution of Research Capacity ................................................................................................... 10 Figure 9: Distribution of Legislative Capacity ................................................................................................ 10 Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder Table ............................................................................................. 11 Table 1: Potential Diabetes Coalition Members............................................................................................. 12 Table 2: Potential First Trimester Prenatal Care Coalition Members......................................................... 13 Page | i
  45. 45. Stakeholder Management: Strategies and Recommendations ................................................................................... 14 Strategies ........................................................................................................................................................................ 14 Engagement and Management .............................................................................................................................. 14 Monitoring and Evaluation .................................................................................................................................... 15 Conclusions, Recommendations, and Implications ................................................................................................ 15Bibliography ....................................................................................................................................................................... 16Appendix A ........................................................................................................................................................................ 18 Organizational Framework ......................................................................................................................................... 18Appendix B ........................................................................................................................................................................ 19 Needs Assessment........................................................................................................................................................ 19Appendix C ....................................................................................................................................................................... 22 Literature Review: Annotated Bibliography ............................................................................................................. 22Appendix D ....................................................................................................................................................................... 25 Definitions of Stakeholder Characteristics and Instructions for Filling in Stakeholder Table ........................ 25 Stakeholder Table (Diabetes) ..................................................................................................................................... 27 Stakeholder Table (First Trimester Prenatal Care).................................................................................................. 28 Page | ii
  46. 46. IntroductionMichelle Berlin M.D., M.P.H. an Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU) physician and researcher,founded the Policy Advisory Toward Health (PATH) for women for women in 2004. PATH for women was aresponse to the critical need for current, evidence-based information concerning women’s health for usetoward policy implementation and it is now a strategic partnership between the OHSU Center for Women’sHealth (CWH) and Portland State University’s (PSU) Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department(WGSS). PATH for women’s revised mission is to provide accurate, high-quality community driven research,data, and analysis to inform women’s health policy and to serve as an independent source of data, analysis,and coalition capacity-building for the public, advocates, and policymakers.PATH for women has expanded from its original emphasis on creating and translating scientific research toinform women’s health policy to include coalition capacity building and community outreach. As a result,PATH for women has two divisions (see Appendix A). One focuses on research and the other focuses onoutreach. The outreach division is housed at WGSS and it aims to develop meaningful relationships withinterested community members, community organizations, public health professionals, educators, andpolicymakers regarding issues facing women in Oregon, such as Women with Diabetes and Women withFirst Trimester Prenatal Care. The outreach division draws its evidenced-based health related informationfrom the Making the Grade on Women’s Health: A National and State-by-State Report Card (ReportCard).The Report Card has been published since 2000. The 5th edition, and most current Report Card evaluates 34health status and 68 health policy indicators and assesses progress in reaching key benchmarks and policyobjectives for each state and for the nation as a whole. For example, according to the Report Card Oregon iscurrently demonstrating a failing grade in two indicators: Women with Diabetes and Women with FirstTrimester Prenatal Care.The research division is housed in CWH where Michelle is a lead author of the aforementioned Report Card(see http://hrc.nwlc.org/). The research division aims to serve as a national and regional resource for dataanalysis, including the provision of accurate and current research concerning women’s health and evidence-based analysis of key issues that specifically affect efficiency, cost, and outcomes of the health of women. Page | 1
  47. 47. Since 2004, the outreach arm of PATH for women has:  Identified key areas in womens health with policy impact and developed materials for use by community groups, local organizations, and the public to influence policy development and implementation  Interpreted the results of health studies for policymakers, the media, and the public  Analyzed and translated existing evidence-based research for the public and policymakersPurpose of the Stakeholder AnalysisTraditionally stakeholders are known as “any person, group, or organization that can place a claim on theorganization’s attention, resources, or output, or that is affected by that output” (Bryson, 2004a, p. 35).Stakeholders are important because social and economic issues are complex problems that have mutiplecauses, are hard to define, have no easy solutions, and attempts to deal with these problems may lead tounintended consequences (Camillus, 2008). These problems require multiple actors and mutiple strategies tocreate sustainable solutions (Bryson, 2004b; Camillus, 2008). Therefore, it is crucial that organizations, such asPATH for women, take into account all of its stakholders as it attempts to solve the problems highlighted bythe Report Card by building support for coalitions that are organized around these issues.A stakeholder analysis “is a process of systematically gathering and analyzing qualitative information todetermine whose interests should be taken into account when developing and/or implementing a policy orprogram” (Schmeer, 1999). In other words, stakeholder analysis is a tool that allows an organization toidentify key actors, such as decision makers and those affected by an issue, then through stakeholdermanagement identify opportunities for creative problem solving and gain support for those initiatives.Stakeholder analyses can also guide an organization’s strategic planning processes (Brugha & Varvasovszky,2000; Bryson, 2004b). Bryson (2004b) believes “…that strategic management processes that employ areasonable number of competently done stakeholder analyses are more likely to be successful – that is, meetmandates, fulfill missions, and create public value – than those that do not.” PATH for women is in the midstof creating its 2012-2015 strategic plan and its 2012-2013 organizational strategic communications plan. Theresults of this stakeholder analysis will be incorporated into its strategic plan. Page | 2
  48. 48. Scope of the stakeholder analysisBy third quarter 2013, PATH for women would like to forge strategic partnerships with coalitions that addresstwo issues: improving the health of women and their children during the first trimester, and preventing andimproving care for women with diabetes. PATH for women will align with these existing coalitions, and willsupport them by assisting with the recruitment of potential coalition members, translating research uponrequest, and training coalition members on how to use qualitative data to support their policy initiatives.PATH for women’s staff plan to identify the appropriate coalitions as part of their duties. Therefore, thisstakeholder analysis supports PATH for women’s goal by identifying and prioritizing potential coalitionmembers that PATH for women can recruit for the existing coalitions.Method(s)The goal of this stakeholder analysis was primarily to identify stakeholders, gather their contact information,and prioritize them for PATH for women’s coalition capacity building efforts. Accordingly, the steps followedincluded identification of stakeholder, information gathering, categorization of stakeholders, development ofa stakeholder table, analysis of the stakeholder table, and prioritization of stakeholders.Identification and Information GatheringThe identification and information gathering process of this stakeholder analysis relied on the knowledge ofPATH for women’s staff and secondary information. Specifically, the work group reviewed organizationalwebsites, advocacy reports, and annual summaries. There are some limitations to this method. The websitesand reports can be outdated and organizational interests may have changed, but these sources are excellentfor an initial report and this method was most appropriate for PATH for women’s strategic planning timeline.Nevertheless, to increase the efficacy of the stakeholder analysis process PATH for women must integrateadditional steps such as a needs assessment. As a result, the work group developed a questionnaire (seeAppendix B) that PATH for women will use in the future to gain primary data on stakeholder interests. PATHfor women will also use this data to revise this report and future stakeholder analyses.Lastly, PATH for women wanted a unique stakeholder scorecard that was grounded in feminist prinicples andfocused less on power rankings and resource levels, and more on relationships, stakeholder needs, and thosewho would be affected the most by the coaltion. As a result, I conducted a literature review (see Appendix C).Based on the literature review I developed a list of characteristics and created a stakeholder table. Page | 3
  49. 49. Prioritization and Analysis of the Stakeholder TableEach stakeholder was scored. The characteristics were assigned a numerical value  Yes = 1 and No = 01  High = 3, Medium = 2, and Low = 1The total number of indicators that each organization addressed through its strategic plans or currentprogramming was also added to the individual scores.The data was also analyzed in order to address the following questions:  Regional representation and balance  Legislative capacity  The number of indicators that the organization addresses  Level of reporting or focus on the issue  Community organization and nonprofit representation  Trade association representation  Research capacity  Government organization or program representation  Direct service provider involvement in the issue  Size of organization or department  Emphasis on socio-demographic issuesThe completed stakeholder tables are included in Appendix D.1 Except for the rural versus urban category where Yes = 2 and No = 0. Page | 4

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