Evaluating and assessing ebooks: the academic library perspective

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Presented at the Canadian Library Association Collections Preconference in Winnipeg, MB on May 29, 2013.

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Evaluating and assessing ebooks: the academic library perspective

  1. 1. Evaluating & assessing ebooks: the academic library perspective Canadian Library Association, May 29, 2013 Pamela Jacobs, University of Guelph pjacobs@uoguelph.ca @pamelajacobs
  2. 2. https://twitter.com/serialsolutions/status/186911288247586816/photo/1
  3. 3. Why ebooks? • Declining use of print books • Increased pressure for user space • Popularity of online content
  4. 4. 4 • 55% of books published since 1990 have never circulated • 10.7% of the books in circulation on a given day were checked out to undergraduate students (34% to graduate students, 23.6% to faculty) http://staffweb.library.cornell.edu/system/files/CollectionUsageTF_ReportFinal11-22-10.pdf
  5. 5. 5 http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2011/2011-06.pdf “80% of the circulation is driven by just 6% of the collection”
  6. 6. How do we measure use of a book? © Kristen M.
  7. 7. Standardized Usage Reports • COUNTER Book Report 2: Number of Successful Section Requests by Month and Title • Multiple platforms
  8. 8. …or not? Karin Bystrom, 2012. Everything that’s wrong with e-book statistics. Poster session, Charleston Conference.
  9. 9. Turnaways • COUNTER Book Report 3: Turnaways by month and title • Level of access will affect level of use
  10. 10. Comparing to print • Apples and oranges • But… – Newer stuff gets more use – Course-related materials get more use – 80/20 ish rule still applies
  11. 11. Cost and Cost/Use • As compared to print • Packages vs. individual titles • Aggregators vs. publishers • Patron and demand-driven models • Subscription vs. purchase vs. lending models • Workflow costs
  12. 12. Evaluating Patron Driven models – Royal Holloway, University of London • EBL – purchase and short term loan model • ₤10,000 available – 37 titles purchased = ₤270/title – 900 titles purchased or loaned = ₤11.11/title – 1500 titles viewed = ₤6.50/title http://ebookchallenge.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/patron-driven_e- books_RHUL_Anna_Grigson_Sept2012.pdf
  13. 13. ARL LibVALUE ebook study • Low cost/title 2012 $19.29 • Low cost/use* 2012 $1.38 • Elsevier user survey – 24/7 access – Easy to search and navigate – Download to laptop http://www.libqual.org/documents/LibQual/publications/2013/libvalue-assessing-the- value-of-ebooks.pdf
  14. 14. Complicating Factors • User experience – Platform issues/preferences – Problem of defining exactly what is an e-book – Textbooks vs. reference vs. scholarly monographs – Course readings and e-reserves • Discoverability – MARC records availability and quality – Semantic linking – Library catalogue as main access point
  15. 15. Thank you for listening… …questions? pjacobs@uoguelph.ca

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