Interactive Education<br />Cyndi Masters, CEO / Founder<br />
Open Source<br />=<br />No socioeconomic<br />Differences<br />Available to All – meets kids where they are<br />
Social Media<br />
Teacher + Facebook + Student<br />=<br />Toxic<br />
Pros and Cons<br />http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2385380,00.asp<br />http://twitterfor teachers.wetpaint.com<br />
?<br />
Social Learning Management System<br />Edmodo<br />
Schoology<br />
Edu20.org<br />
Social Book Marking,<br />RSS and Blogging <br />
Gamification<br />
“Games aren’t about wasting time they <br />Are about learning how to<br />Overcome obstacles and challenges, they are<br ...
“The use of game play mechanics for Non-game <br />Applications”  <br />“Funware”<br />-Wikipedia<br />
Student Gamification Resources<br />Go Animate 4 Schools<br />
Museum Box<br />
Story Jumper<br />
Study Ladder<br />
Student Educational Games <br />
Horace Mann founded public education in 1937.<br />It hasn’t changed much!<br />
         + Memorize + Test + Grade<br />=<br />#OBSOLETE<br />
Gamifyng Education  = Mastery  = Success<br />
Grading System<br />promotes de-motivation<br />
 A+<br />
Start from 0<br />And <br />Gain points with achievement<br />
Class-wide Achievements<br />
Gamification Promotes Agency<br />Agency:<br />“The idea that we control our own destiny<br />And our choices matter”<br /...
Games teach that different choices produce <br />different outcomes<br />
EXTERNAL MOTIVATORS<br />thru ARGs<br />
ARG<br />Alternate<br />Reality<br />Game<br />
ARG’s use information as milestones and achievements<br />to unlock a greater goal or task<br />
ARG’s promote:<br /><ul><li>Engagement while continuing to learn
Great mystery
Make learning magical and mysterious</li></li></ul><li>Alternate Reality Games<br />An interactive narrative that uses the...
Example of an ARG – Implementation in the classroom<br />
Case Study: World Without Oil<br />1,800 people combined imagination with insight to create World Without Oil (WWO), a rea...
Lesson Format<br />Divided into 10 Lessons, each with the following structure:<br />Set the Stage<br />Take Action<br />Le...
Lesson 1: Oil Crisis Introduction<br />Part 1: Set the Stage<br />A global oil crisis has begun. Oil usage worldwide has i...
Lesson 1: Oil Crisis Introduction<br />Part 2: Take Action<br />Promote critical thinking with group discussion questions....
Lesson 1: Oil Crisis Introduction<br />Part 3: Lesson Activity<br />Examine a specific topic that gives context to help st...
Lesson 1: Oil Crisis Introduction<br />Part 4: Reflection<br />Now that they have a better understanding of the current oi...
Lesson 1: Oil Crisis Introduction<br />Part 5: Take it Further<br />Don’t let the game stop once out of the classroom.<br ...
DRINK the<br />Kool-Aid !<br />
Teacher’s Resources<br />
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Interactive Education

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Learn about the latest tools to use in education with students from elementary to high school. Tap into kids with the use of interactive teaching. Learn where to go and what sites are safe for use in the classroom.

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Interactive Education

  1. 1. Interactive Education<br />Cyndi Masters, CEO / Founder<br />
  2. 2.
  3. 3. Open Source<br />=<br />No socioeconomic<br />Differences<br />Available to All – meets kids where they are<br />
  4. 4. Social Media<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6. Teacher + Facebook + Student<br />=<br />Toxic<br />
  7. 7.
  8. 8.
  9. 9.
  10. 10.
  11. 11.
  12. 12. Pros and Cons<br />http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2385380,00.asp<br />http://twitterfor teachers.wetpaint.com<br />
  13. 13. ?<br />
  14. 14. Social Learning Management System<br />Edmodo<br />
  15. 15. Schoology<br />
  16. 16. Edu20.org<br />
  17. 17. Social Book Marking,<br />RSS and Blogging <br />
  18. 18.
  19. 19.
  20. 20.
  21. 21. Gamification<br />
  22. 22.
  23. 23. “Games aren’t about wasting time they <br />Are about learning how to<br />Overcome obstacles and challenges, they are<br />About mastery.”<br />- Forget Gamification: It’s Time for Mastery<br />
  24. 24. “The use of game play mechanics for Non-game <br />Applications” <br />“Funware”<br />-Wikipedia<br />
  25. 25. Student Gamification Resources<br />Go Animate 4 Schools<br />
  26. 26. Museum Box<br />
  27. 27. Story Jumper<br />
  28. 28. Study Ladder<br />
  29. 29. Student Educational Games <br />
  30. 30. Horace Mann founded public education in 1937.<br />It hasn’t changed much!<br />
  31. 31. + Memorize + Test + Grade<br />=<br />#OBSOLETE<br />
  32. 32. Gamifyng Education = Mastery = Success<br />
  33. 33. Grading System<br />promotes de-motivation<br />
  34. 34. A+<br />
  35. 35. Start from 0<br />And <br />Gain points with achievement<br />
  36. 36. Class-wide Achievements<br />
  37. 37. Gamification Promotes Agency<br />Agency:<br />“The idea that we control our own destiny<br />And our choices matter”<br />-http://www.escapistmagazine.com/videos/view/extra-credits/3167-Gamifying-Education<br />
  38. 38. Games teach that different choices produce <br />different outcomes<br />
  39. 39. EXTERNAL MOTIVATORS<br />thru ARGs<br />
  40. 40. ARG<br />Alternate<br />Reality<br />Game<br />
  41. 41. ARG’s use information as milestones and achievements<br />to unlock a greater goal or task<br />
  42. 42. ARG’s promote:<br /><ul><li>Engagement while continuing to learn
  43. 43. Great mystery
  44. 44. Make learning magical and mysterious</li></li></ul><li>Alternate Reality Games<br />An interactive narrative that uses the real world as a platform, often involving multiple media and game elements, to tell a story that may be affected by participants’ ideas or actions.<br />Form is defined by intense player involvement with a story that takes place in real-time and evolves according to participants’ responses.<br />
  45. 45. Example of an ARG – Implementation in the classroom<br />
  46. 46. Case Study: World Without Oil<br />1,800 people combined imagination with insight to create World Without Oil (WWO), a realistic simulation of the first 32 weeks of a global oil shortage chronicled in 1,500 personal blog posts, videos, images and voicemails.<br />Used as a tool to engage students with questions about energy use, sustainability, the role energy plays in our economy, culture, worldview, and history.<br />
  47. 47. Lesson Format<br />Divided into 10 Lessons, each with the following structure:<br />Set the Stage<br />Take Action<br />Lesson Activity<br />Reflect<br />Take it Further<br />
  48. 48. Lesson 1: Oil Crisis Introduction<br />Part 1: Set the Stage<br />A global oil crisis has begun. Oil usage worldwide has increased to where the oil supply can only meet 95% of it. <br />Present one or two stories from WWO to give students the gist of the latest events in the oil crisis.<br />
  49. 49. Lesson 1: Oil Crisis Introduction<br />Part 2: Take Action<br />Promote critical thinking with group discussion questions.<br />What are your initial reactions to a spike in fuel prices and the coming oil shortage?<br />How might your life have to change? How serious are those changes? How ready are you to make them?<br />Why did oil prices rise so fast? Why did the announcement “an oil shortage is coming” cause fuel prices to rise immediately?<br />
  50. 50. Lesson 1: Oil Crisis Introduction<br />Part 3: Lesson Activity<br />Examine a specific topic that gives context to help students gain a better understanding.<br />Ex. What products besides fuel is petroleum necessary?<br />Oil moved the tractor that grew your food<br />Oil moved the truck that brought iPods to your store<br />Oil mined the coal that generated the power that pumped water to your city<br />Oil moved the ambulance that took your Aunt Martha to the hospital so that your cousin Samantha could be safely born<br />
  51. 51. Lesson 1: Oil Crisis Introduction<br />Part 4: Reflection<br />Now that they have a better understanding of the current oil crisis, it is time for them to reflect on the recent events. <br />Ex. How are you personally connected to oil and what does this crisis mean to you? Your reflection should incorporate your new understanding of oil and the changes that you personally may have to make if the situation worsens.<br />Have students record their reflections in a variety of media <br />Blog posts, videos, podcasts, photographs, drawings, etc.<br />
  52. 52. Lesson 1: Oil Crisis Introduction<br />Part 5: Take it Further<br />Don’t let the game stop once out of the classroom.<br />Use additional materials and resources provided by World Without Oil to extend the critical thinking experience between sessions.<br />The goal is for students to continue to apply its lens of inquiry to the world around them.<br />
  53. 53. DRINK the<br />Kool-Aid !<br />
  54. 54. Teacher’s Resources<br />
  55. 55.
  56. 56. Video<br />

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