Our Strength and Our EndeavourOur Strength and Our EndeavourOur Strength and Our EndeavourOur Strength and Our EndeavourOu...
 Pulse Polio immunization programme launched in Delhi in 1994
and then across India in 1995.
 Raised US $135 million in ...
 The annual expenditure in India for the PolioPlus campaign is over
Rs. 1400 Crores
 Govt. of India has invested US$ 2 b...
 Annual global savings of $ 1 billion in 25 years
 1988 : 10% Children lived in Polio free countries
2012: 90% of childr...
2001-02 : Two NIDs and one Sub NID followed by ‘House-to-House’
Immunization ; 163 million children immunised.
2002-03 : T...
On 26 May 2012, the World Health Assembly declared
ending polio “programmatic emergency for global public
health”.
2013 : ...
Maps: Global Polio Status 1988 / 2014Maps: Global Polio Status 1988 / 2014Maps: Global Polio Status 1988 / 2014Maps: Globa...
WPV2
24/10/1999
Aligarh (UP)
WPV1
13/01/2011
Howrah (WB)
WPV3
22/10/2010
Pakur (JH)
Last wild poliovirus cases by type, In...
Major milestones - IndiaMajor milestones - IndiaMajor milestones - IndiaMajor milestones - IndiaMajor milestones - India
R...
POLIO FREE CONCLAVE 2014 -POLIO FREE CONCLAVE 2014 -POLIO FREE CONCLAVE 2014 -POLIO FREE CONCLAVE 2014 -POLIO FREE CONCLAV...
Polio Eradication StrategiesPolio Eradication StrategiesPolio Eradication StrategiesPolio Eradication StrategiesPolio Erad...
 Routine Immunisation ProgramsRoutine Immunisation ProgramsRoutine Immunisation ProgramsRoutine Immunisation Programs...
For ChildrenFor ChildrenFor ChildrenFor ChildrenFor Children
DPT booster-1DPT booster-1DPT booster-1DPT booster-1DPT boost...
 Pulse Polio Immunisation on NIDs/SNIDsPulse Polio Immunisation on NIDs/SNIDsPulse Polio Immunisation on NIDs/SNIDsPulse ...
 To continue our collaboration with renewed spirit with the govern-
ments and our partners agencies to redeem our pledge ...
 BUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATIC
 Confer with administrative heads like Principal Health Se...
MOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATION
 PolioPlus Workshops at different levels: Rotary District, Revenue
Dis...
 IEC: Production and distribution of all publicity materials [Banners,
Posters, vertical boards, caps, aprons, whistles, ...
 The Task Force [both Pulse Polio and routine immunization]
must be activated. Attend the task force meetings and help in...
 Social mobilization: Special workshops for religious leaders, medi-
cal practitioners, elected representatives, labour o...
 Publicize the programme by effective use of IEC Materials: Ban-
ners at the booths, Vertical boards and posters on the r...
 Provide refreshments / food packets to the vaccinators and vol-
unteers if necessary.
 Make sure all transit points and...
MOP UP AND OUTBREAK RESPONE IMMUNIZATIONSMOP UP AND OUTBREAK RESPONE IMMUNIZATIONSMOP UP AND OUTBREAK RESPONE IMMUNIZATION...
For this, a formal Routine Immunization Structure is essential :
Routine Immunization StructureRoutine Immunization Struct...
 The R.I. Session is held and planned.
 The Session is held for the designated hours.
 There were adequate syringes.
 ...
 Encouraging community participation to encourage community
leaders and medical practitioners to take action.
 Involving...
 Media Campaign involving Bollywood celebrities, their messages
on polio were aired on TV channels across the country.
 ...
 Incentive to health workers to overcome fatigue were provided in
the state of U.P. and Bihar - Towel, Umbrella, Lunch Bo...
 Production of IEC material on Zinc and ORS.
 Elocution competition for Schools all over the Country to create
awareness...
immunization services paving way for greater acceptance of the polio vac-
cine and eliminating resistance in underserved-p...
Gates Foundation Challenge GrantGates Foundation Challenge GrantGates Foundation Challenge GrantGates Foundation Challenge...
 Rotary International: provides support to the advocacy at the state
and district levels and to the communication strateg...
Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) of the Global Polio Eradica-Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) of the Global Polio Erad...
ConclusionConclusionConclusionConclusionConclusion
Unprecedented challenges loom over the polio eradication program. There...
The goal of stopping polio transmission by the end of 2014 now stands at
serious risk. This situation must be turned round...
India:India:India:India:India:
The Indian Programme is looking at the question of legacy – of what should
come next. The c...
Last wild polio case Last OPV2 use
2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018
Certification
Virus detection
& interruption
Polio Eradic...
Media And Polio Eradication Program:Media And Polio Eradication Program:Media And Polio Eradication Program:Media And Poli...
Rotary International’s PolioPlus Program in the media:Rotary International’s PolioPlus Program in the media:Rotary Interna...
 The disease caused by the virus is commonly known as Polio vi-
rus. It is of 3 types - P1, P2 & P3. P2 was eradicated fr...
Types of VaccineTypes of VaccineTypes of VaccineTypes of VaccineTypes of Vaccine
ORAL POLIO VACCINE [OPV].ORAL POLIO VACCI...
 When a person immunized with IPV is infected with wild polio
virus, virus can still multiply inside the intestines and b...
 Resistance from a few communities demanding better health care
and civic facilities as a consequence.
 Migratory popula...
 Now that Polio immunization is regularly organised, is Rou-Now that Polio immunization is regularly organised, is Rou-No...
Questions and Answers on VDPV cases:Questions and Answers on VDPV cases:Questions and Answers on VDPV cases:Questions and ...
Low routine immunization coverage with tOPV, the vaccine which
produces immunity against type 2 poliovirus also, eradicati...
 efforts to determine if transmission of the VDPV has occurred in the
community;
 assessment of population immunity in t...
DRAFT AGENDA FOR DISTRICT POLIOPLUS ORIENTATION &DRAFT AGENDA FOR DISTRICT POLIOPLUS ORIENTATION &DRAFT AGENDA FOR DISTRIC...
DRAFT AGENDA FORDRAFT AGENDA FORDRAFT AGENDA FORDRAFT AGENDA FORDRAFT AGENDA FOR DISTRICT WORKSHOP ON ROUTINEDISTRICT WORK...
GLOSSARYGLOSSARYGLOSSARYGLOSSARYGLOSSARY
AcronymsAcronymsAcronymsAcronymsAcronyms
 NID – NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION DAY
 SNID...
Gary C.K. Huang
Rotary International President
One Rotary Center
1560, Sherman Avenue Evanston,
IL USA. 60201-3698
Tel. : ...
P. T. Prabhakar
Rotary International Director
15 Sivaswami Street, Mylapore,
Chennai, Tamil Nadu-600004
Tel. (O) : 044-281...
Noraseth Pathmanand
Past Rotary International Director
Sinovest, 4/F Lake Rajada Off. Complex,
192/23 Rajadabhisek Rd., Kl...
CHAIRMAN
PDG Deepak Kapur
Gulab House, Mayapuri
New Delhi – 110 064
Tel (O) : 011-28115312, 28115613
Tel (R) : 011-2651538...
INDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEM...
INDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEM...
INDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEM...
DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS
2980
S P Balasubramaniam
Shanak...
DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS
3051
Jagdish B Patel
1, Indrapu...
DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS
3090
Pradeep Kumar Chehal
Shop ...
DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS
3140
Ajay Gupta
6, Firpos Build...
DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS
3201
P Venugopalan Menon
M/s. B...
3250
Sanjay Khemka
Khemka Tower, 1 “Govind Nagar”
Opp. Bekarbandh, Dhanbad-826001
(Jharkhand)
Tel (O) : 0326-2291420
(R) :...
DISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIO...
DISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIO...
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final

4,764 views

Published on

These are the latest figures in the worldwide effort to eradicate polio. Rotary International has since 1988 spent millions of dollars to make this dream a reality.
To learn more of this effort please visit our site and be a part of history: http://thisclose.endpolio.org/en

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

INDIA - POLIO ERADICATION FIGURES - Rotary International Operation manual inside 2014-15 final

  1. 1. Our Strength and Our EndeavourOur Strength and Our EndeavourOur Strength and Our EndeavourOur Strength and Our EndeavourOur Strength and Our Endeavour WorldwideWorldwideWorldwideWorldwideWorldwide  34,474* clubs in more than 219* Countries; approximately 12,05,887* members. (* as on March, 2014) IndiaIndiaIndiaIndiaIndia  Approx. 3280* Rotary Clubs with 1,24, 764* members along with 859 Innerwheel clubs with their 21,398 members.(* as on February 2014 ) Efforts At a GlanceEfforts At a GlanceEfforts At a GlanceEfforts At a GlanceEfforts At a Glance 1979 : Rotary makes a 5 year pledge to immunize six million chil- dren in the Philippines against Polio under the 3H grant of 6 million $. 1985 : Rotary launches its most ambitious program: PolioPlus 1986 : Rotary International provides US $2.6 million grant to Tamil Nadu for Polio Vaccine. 1987 : Rotarians around the world raise US $246 million in PolioPlus funds, twice the initial goal of US $120 million for the purchase of vaccine for a five year term 1988 : World Health Assembly resolves to eradicate Polio from the world: Target 2000 Polio Free World
  2. 2.  Pulse Polio immunization programme launched in Delhi in 1994 and then across India in 1995.  Raised US $135 million in 2003-04 against the target of US $80 million.  Rotary played a major role in decision by donor Govts. to contribute more than US $ 8 billion to the support.  More - than 1.0 Million Rotarians as volunteers  Hundres of Thousands of Volunteers Mobilised  Largest Internationally coordinated project in peace time 2012 : Raised US$ 228 million against Bill & Melinda Gates Foun- dation challenge grant of US$ 200 million Rotary International’s Financial ContributionRotary International’s Financial ContributionRotary International’s Financial ContributionRotary International’s Financial ContributionRotary International’s Financial Contribution  Rotary’s contribution worldwide more than US $ 1.2 billion (Rs.6000 crore @ 50)  Rotary in September 2012 committed US$ 75 million over 3 years.  Rotary apart from its own contribution helped raise more than $ 8 Billion [Rs.40,000 crores] from donor Government for the cause.  Rotary International’s contribution to the Global Polio Eradication Initiative since 1988 accounts for nearly 12% of all contributions to the global budget through 2010 and represents approximately 51% of private sector contributions to the Initiative  Cost to the programme per Rotarian World wide is US$ 990 (Rs. 49521) (Rotarians World wide - 1.21 million)
  3. 3.  The annual expenditure in India for the PolioPlus campaign is over Rs. 1400 Crores  Govt. of India has invested US$ 2 billion in the campaign so far.  Per day cost of the Programme is Rs. 3.8 Crore  Rotary’s India Contribution is approx. Rs. 890 crores (US $ 178 million)  Cost to the programme per Rotarian in India is Rs. 71300 (US$ 1426) (Rotarians in India – 1,24,764)  A Child can be protected against Polio for as little as US$ 0.60 cents [INR 30*] worth of vaccine.  supported UNICEF in India till Dec. 2013, US$ 71.42 million.  supported WHO in India till Dec. 2013, US$ 69.74 million.  Millions of dollars “IN KIND” and personal contributions through Club and Districts. Fundraising Partnership with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation:Fundraising Partnership with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation:Fundraising Partnership with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation:Fundraising Partnership with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation:Fundraising Partnership with Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation: In June 2013, Rotary International and the Gates Foundation announced a fundraising partnership that could generate up to US$525 million in new money for polio eradication. Under the new fundraising agreement, announced the Gates Foundation will match 2 for 1 every new dollar Rotary commits to polio eradication up to $35 million per year through 2018. Gains of PolioPlus ProgrammeGains of PolioPlus ProgrammeGains of PolioPlus ProgrammeGains of PolioPlus ProgrammeGains of PolioPlus Programme  122 nations benefitted for PolioPlus grants  Over 7.0 Million saved from Polio since 1988  Over 2.0 Billion of children vaccinated
  4. 4.  Annual global savings of $ 1 billion in 25 years  1988 : 10% Children lived in Polio free countries 2012: 90% of children live in Polio Free Countries.134 countries declared Polio Free 210 Countries free of Indigenous Polio • Implementation of Effective Disease Surveillance system • Dependable Cold Chain introduced for preservation of Vaccines • Immunization Culture established in the world 1994 : First Pulse Polio Immunization Drive launched in Delhi. 1.4 million children (0-3 years) immunised. 1995-96 : First National Immunization Day (NID); 88 million children (0-3 years) immunised. 1996-97 : Second NID; 127 million children ( 0-5 years) immunized. 1997-98 : Third NID; 130 million children immunized. 1998-99 : Fourth NID; 136 million children immunised. 1999-00 : Intensified strategy introduced with Four Sub NIDs and Two NIDs. 149 million children immunized. ‘House-to-House’ Immunization introduced. 2000-01 : Two Sub NIDs and two NIDs followed by ‘House-to-House’ Immunization; 159 million children immunized. Emphasis laid on Routine Immunization. Extensive Mop-Up campaign introduced.
  5. 5. 2001-02 : Two NIDs and one Sub NID followed by ‘House-to-House’ Immunization ; 163 million children immunised. 2002-03 : Two NIDs and two Sub NIDs followed by ‘House-to-House’ Immunization. 2003-04 : Two NIDs and four Sub NIDs followed by House-to-House Immunisation; 168 million children immunized. 2004 : Five NIDs, one Sub NID, House-to-House Immunisation and large scale mop-ups conducted successfully; 169 million children immunized. 2005 : Two NIDs and six Sub NIDs followed by House-to-House Immunization undertaken; 170 million children immunized. 2006 : Two NIDs and six Sub NIDs followed by House-to-House Immunization undertaken; 177 million children immunized. 2007 : Two NIDs and Six Sub NIDs followed by House-to-House Immunization undertaken. Monovalent Vaccine Introduced. 2008 : Three NIDs and Six Sub NIDs, followed by House-to-House and mop-ups. 2009 : One NID and Nine Sub NIDs, followed by House-to-House and mop-ups. 2010 : Two NIDs and Ten Sub NIDs, followed by House-to-House and mop-ups. Bivalent Vaccine introduced. 2011 : Two NIDs and Six Sub NIDs, followed by House-to-House and mop-ups wherever required as per IEAG recommenda- tion. 2012 : Two NIDs and Four Sub NIDs, followed by House-to-House and mop-ups wherever required as per IEAG recommenda- tion.
  6. 6. On 26 May 2012, the World Health Assembly declared ending polio “programmatic emergency for global public health”. 2013 : Two NIDs and Four Sub NIDs, followed by House-to-House and mop-ups wherever required as per IEAG recommenda- tion. 2014 : Two NIDs and three Sub NIDs, followed by house-to-house and mop-ups wherever required as per IEAG recommenda- tion. Immunization activities - 2014-15Immunization activities - 2014-15Immunization activities - 2014-15Immunization activities - 2014-15Immunization activities - 2014-15 (Proposed by IEAG)(Proposed by IEAG)(Proposed by IEAG)(Proposed by IEAG)(Proposed by IEAG)
  7. 7. Maps: Global Polio Status 1988 / 2014Maps: Global Polio Status 1988 / 2014Maps: Global Polio Status 1988 / 2014Maps: Global Polio Status 1988 / 2014Maps: Global Polio Status 1988 / 2014 Global Polio Status – 2014Global Polio Status – 2014Global Polio Status – 2014Global Polio Status – 2014Global Polio Status – 2014 (as on 4 March - 2014)(as on 4 March - 2014)(as on 4 March - 2014)(as on 4 March - 2014)(as on 4 March - 2014) India Polio Status - 2014India Polio Status - 2014India Polio Status - 2014India Polio Status - 2014India Polio Status - 2014 (as on 4 March 2014)(as on 4 March 2014)(as on 4 March 2014)(as on 4 March 2014)(as on 4 March 2014) 20112011201120112011  650 cases650 cases650 cases650 cases650 cases  4 endemic countries4 endemic countries4 endemic countries4 endemic countries4 endemic countries 20132013201320132013  404 cases404 cases404 cases404 cases404 cases 20142014201420142014  28 cases28 cases28 cases28 cases28 cases (as on 4th March 2014)(as on 4th March 2014)(as on 4th March 2014)(as on 4th March 2014)(as on 4th March 2014) 3 endemic countries3 endemic countries3 endemic countries3 endemic countries3 endemic countries
  8. 8. WPV2 24/10/1999 Aligarh (UP) WPV1 13/01/2011 Howrah (WB) WPV3 22/10/2010 Pakur (JH) Last wild poliovirus cases by type, IndiaLast wild poliovirus cases by type, IndiaLast wild poliovirus cases by type, IndiaLast wild poliovirus cases by type, IndiaLast wild poliovirus cases by type, India 20142014201420142014 20132013201320132013 20122012201220122012 20112011201120112011 No New CaseNo New CaseNo New CaseNo New CaseNo New Case ReportedReportedReportedReportedReported No New CaseNo New CaseNo New CaseNo New CaseNo New Case ReportedReportedReportedReportedReported No New CaseNo New CaseNo New CaseNo New CaseNo New Case ReportedReportedReportedReportedReported 01 case in 0101 case in 0101 case in 0101 case in 0101 case in 01 revenue districtrevenue districtrevenue districtrevenue districtrevenue district (P1-01) district(P1-01) district(P1-01) district(P1-01) district(P1-01) district
  9. 9. Major milestones - IndiaMajor milestones - IndiaMajor milestones - IndiaMajor milestones - IndiaMajor milestones - India Rotary celebrates certification of Polio Free IndiaRotary celebrates certification of Polio Free IndiaRotary celebrates certification of Polio Free IndiaRotary celebrates certification of Polio Free IndiaRotary celebrates certification of Polio Free India 2014 is a landmark year in the history of the Polio campaign in India and the world. The South East Asia Regional Certification Commission for Polio Eradica- tion met on 26 & 27 March, 2014 and certified the South East Asia Region as defined by WHO – of which India is a part – as Polio Free. Bangladesh, Bhutan, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Indonesia, Maldives, Myanmar, Nepal, Srilanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, are the other countries of the region. 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
  10. 10. POLIO FREE CONCLAVE 2014 -POLIO FREE CONCLAVE 2014 -POLIO FREE CONCLAVE 2014 -POLIO FREE CONCLAVE 2014 -POLIO FREE CONCLAVE 2014 - Rotary celebrates the regional Polio- free certification with a grand event on 29-30 March 2014 in New Delhi, India. “Global Certification: An independent commission will consider global certification when no wild polio virus associated cases have occurred for at least three years, in the presence of certification-standard surveillance, and all wild poliomyelitis stocks have been appropriately contained all over the world.” India – Polio: Travel AdvisoryIndia – Polio: Travel AdvisoryIndia – Polio: Travel AdvisoryIndia – Polio: Travel AdvisoryIndia – Polio: Travel Advisory  India has made polio vaccination a requirement for people coming from and travelling to seven polio-affected countries - Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Israel, Kenya, Somalia, Nigeria and Pakistan.  All travellers coming from and going to these countries will be re- quired to take oral polio vaccine (OPV) six weeks before their depar- ture from their country and carry a certificate as proof of vaccina- tion.  The new polio immunization regime for travellers came into effect from 30 January 2014. The Indian embassies in the seven coun- tries have shared this information widely to enable travelers to take OPV. The measure was taken to prevent poliovirus importationThe measure was taken to prevent poliovirus importationThe measure was taken to prevent poliovirus importationThe measure was taken to prevent poliovirus importationThe measure was taken to prevent poliovirus importation into India from polio-affected countriesinto India from polio-affected countriesinto India from polio-affected countriesinto India from polio-affected countriesinto India from polio-affected countries
  11. 11. Polio Eradication StrategiesPolio Eradication StrategiesPolio Eradication StrategiesPolio Eradication StrategiesPolio Eradication Strategies
  12. 12.  Routine Immunisation ProgramsRoutine Immunisation ProgramsRoutine Immunisation ProgramsRoutine Immunisation ProgramsRoutine Immunisation Programs National Immunization Schedule for Infants, Children and PregnantNational Immunization Schedule for Infants, Children and PregnantNational Immunization Schedule for Infants, Children and PregnantNational Immunization Schedule for Infants, Children and PregnantNational Immunization Schedule for Infants, Children and Pregnant WomenWomenWomenWomenWomen VaccineVaccineVaccineVaccineVaccine When to giveWhen to giveWhen to giveWhen to giveWhen to give DoseDoseDoseDoseDose RouteRouteRouteRouteRoute SiteSiteSiteSiteSite For Pregnant WomenFor Pregnant WomenFor Pregnant WomenFor Pregnant WomenFor Pregnant Women TT-1TT-1TT-1TT-1TT-1 TT-2TT-2TT-2TT-2TT-2 TT-BoosterTT-BoosterTT-BoosterTT-BoosterTT-Booster Early in pregnency 0.5 ml Intra-muscular Upper Arm 4 weeks after TT-1* 0.5 ml Intra-muscular Upper Arm If received 2 TT doses in 0.5 ml Intra-muscular Upper Arm a pregnancy within the last 3 years* For InfantsFor InfantsFor InfantsFor InfantsFor Infants B C GB C GB C GB C GB C G At birth or as early as possible till one year of age 0.1ml(0.05ml until 1 month age) Intra-dermal Left Upper Arm Hepatitis BHepatitis BHepatitis BHepatitis BHepatitis B Birth doseBirth doseBirth doseBirth doseBirth dose At birth or as early as possible with in 24 hours 0.5 ml Intra-muscular Antero-lateral side of mid-thigh OPV-OOPV-OOPV-OOPV-OOPV-O OPV 1,2,OPV 1,2,OPV 1,2,OPV 1,2,OPV 1,2, & 3& 3& 3& 3& 3 At birth or as early as 2 drops Oral Oral possible with in the first 15 days. At 6 weeks, 10 weeks & 2 drops Oral Oral 14 weeks (OPV can be given till 5 years of age) Penta Vaccine in selected statesPenta Vaccine in selected statesPenta Vaccine in selected statesPenta Vaccine in selected statesPenta Vaccine in selected states DPT 1,2DPT 1,2DPT 1,2DPT 1,2DPT 1,2 & 3& 3& 3& 3& 3 At 6 weeks, 10 weeks & 14 weeks (DPT can be given up to 7 years of age) 0.5 ml Intra-muscular Antero-lateral side of mid-thigh [Only in states where DPT is given][Only in states where DPT is given][Only in states where DPT is given][Only in states where DPT is given][Only in states where DPT is given] HepatitisHepatitisHepatitisHepatitisHepatitis B 1 , 2 & 3B 1 , 2 & 3B 1 , 2 & 3B 1 , 2 & 3B 1 , 2 & 3 At 6 weeks, 10 weeks & 14 weeks (can be given till one year of age) 0.5 ml Intra-muscular Antero-lateral side of mid-thigh
  13. 13. For ChildrenFor ChildrenFor ChildrenFor ChildrenFor Children DPT booster-1DPT booster-1DPT booster-1DPT booster-1DPT booster-1 16-24 months 0.5ml Intra-muscular Antero-lateral side of mid- thigh Measles 2Measles 2Measles 2Measles 2Measles 2ndndndndnd 16-24 months 0.5 ml Sub-cutaneous Right upper dosedosedosedosedose Arm OPV BoosterOPV BoosterOPV BoosterOPV BoosterOPV Booster 16-24 months 2 drops Oral Oral JapaneseJapaneseJapaneseJapaneseJapanese 16-24 months 0.5ml Sub-cutaneous Left Upper Encephalitis**Encephalitis**Encephalitis**Encephalitis**Encephalitis** Arm Vitamin A***Vitamin A***Vitamin A***Vitamin A***Vitamin A*** 16 months. Then, one 2 ml(2 lakh IU) Oral Oral (2nd to 9th(2nd to 9th(2nd to 9th(2nd to 9th(2nd to 9th dose every 6 months dose)dose)dose)dose)dose) up to the age of 5 years. DPT Booster-2DPT Booster-2DPT Booster-2DPT Booster-2DPT Booster-2 5-6 years 0.5ml. Intra-muscular Upper Arm TTTTTTTTTT 10 years & 16 years 0.5 ml Intra-muscular Upper Arm * Give TT-2 or Booster doses before 36 weeks of pregnancy. However, give these even if more than 36 weeks have passed. Give TT to a woman in labour, if she has not previously received TT. ** JE Vaccine is introduced in select endemic districts after the campaign. *** The 2nd to 9th doses of Vitamin A can be administered to children 1-5 years old during biannual rounds, in collaboration with ICDS. **** Pentavalent vaccine is introduced in place of DPT and HepB 1, 2 and 3 in select states. Pentavalent*Pentavalent*Pentavalent*Pentavalent*Pentavalent* ***1,2&3***1,2&3***1,2&3***1,2&3***1,2&3 At 6 weeks, 10 weeks & 14 weeks (can be given till one year of age) 0.5 ml Intra-muscular Antero-lateral side of mid-thigh Measles-1Measles-1Measles-1Measles-1Measles-1 9 completed months-12 months. (Measles can be given till 5 years of age) 0.5 ml Sub-cutaneous Right upper Arm J E - 1 * *J E - 1 * *J E - 1 * *J E - 1 * *J E - 1 * * 9 completed months - 12 months 0.5 ml Sub-cutaneous Left upper Arm Vatamin AVatamin AVatamin AVatamin AVatamin A (1(1(1(1(1ststststst dose)dose)dose)dose)dose) 9 completed months with measles 1ml (1lakh IU) Oral Oral
  14. 14.  Pulse Polio Immunisation on NIDs/SNIDsPulse Polio Immunisation on NIDs/SNIDsPulse Polio Immunisation on NIDs/SNIDsPulse Polio Immunisation on NIDs/SNIDsPulse Polio Immunisation on NIDs/SNIDs  Booth Immunization.  House-to-House Immunization.  Mop-up ImmunisationMop-up ImmunisationMop-up ImmunisationMop-up ImmunisationMop-up Immunisation  Outbreak Response Immunization (ORI).  Intensive Mop-up Immunization.  Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) SurveillanceAcute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) SurveillanceAcute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) SurveillanceAcute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) SurveillanceAcute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) Surveillance The number of AFP cases reported each year is used as an indicator of a country’s ability to detect polio – even in countries where the disease no longer occurs. A country’s surveillance system needs to be sensitive enough to detect at least one case of AFP for every 100 000 children under 15 – even in the absence of polio. Delhi Commitment – Polio Summit 2012Delhi Commitment – Polio Summit 2012Delhi Commitment – Polio Summit 2012Delhi Commitment – Polio Summit 2012Delhi Commitment – Polio Summit 2012 We Rotarians in India Commit:We Rotarians in India Commit:We Rotarians in India Commit:We Rotarians in India Commit:We Rotarians in India Commit:  To vigorously pursue our incessant efforts hand in hand with govern- ments and other organizations towards eradication of Polio and seek the help of one and all to reach out to every child of the prescribed age to get Polio drops and to achieve the benchmark of a certified Polio free world.  To strengthen the routine immunization so that every childTo strengthen the routine immunization so that every childTo strengthen the routine immunization so that every childTo strengthen the routine immunization so that every childTo strengthen the routine immunization so that every child born receives the required doses of Polio vaccine at regu-born receives the required doses of Polio vaccine at regu-born receives the required doses of Polio vaccine at regu-born receives the required doses of Polio vaccine at regu-born receives the required doses of Polio vaccine at regu- lar intervals.lar intervals.lar intervals.lar intervals.lar intervals.  To engage in the service of humanity with all resources at our com- mand to ensure a Polio free world.  To support the Rotarians of the Polio endemic countries to seek Po- lio free status for their respective countries.
  15. 15.  To continue our collaboration with renewed spirit with the govern- ments and our partners agencies to redeem our pledge to the chil- dren of the world to give them a Polio free world. ROLE OF ROTARY IN POLIO ERADICATIONROLE OF ROTARY IN POLIO ERADICATIONROLE OF ROTARY IN POLIO ERADICATIONROLE OF ROTARY IN POLIO ERADICATIONROLE OF ROTARY IN POLIO ERADICATION ROTARY DISTRICT LEVELROTARY DISTRICT LEVELROTARY DISTRICT LEVELROTARY DISTRICT LEVELROTARY DISTRICT LEVEL Rotary District Administration should have an effective District Polio Plus Committee and a Routine Immunization Committee consisting of representatives from every zone / revenue District and charged with Polio eradication & Routine Immunization activities as the top priority agenda. Assistant Governors must be actively involved in the programme. All the four pillars of Polio eradication, namely: Routine Immunization, NIDs, AFP Surveillance and Mop up Immunization should be focused. ADVOCACYADVOCACYADVOCACYADVOCACYADVOCACY  POLITICALPOLITICALPOLITICALPOLITICALPOLITICAL  Confer regularly with the top political leaders including Chief Min- ister and other important ministers of the state cabinet in charge of health and family welfare, education, urban development, panchayat raj etc; chiefs of all political parties, corporation May- ors, Zilla Panchayat Presidents.  Recognize political leaders who have made significant contribu- tion to the programme.  Get the Pulse polio programme launched by the Chief Minister of the state or an equally important personality.
  16. 16.  BUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATIC  Confer with administrative heads like Principal Health Secretary, Mission Directors of National Rural Health Mission, State and District Immunization Officers, District Magistrates, CEOs of Zilla Panchayats, Corporation Commissioners etc.  Impress upon the administration the urgency of filling vacancies in health administration at different levels.  The State/District task forces for pulse polio & Routine immuni- zation to be made functional. The Asst.Governors/Revenue Dis- trict Coordinators should take the initiative in this regard and invite themselves to the task force meetings.  The District Governor/Asst Governor/Revenue District Coordi- nator to meet the concerned officials at different levels and es- tablish an effective coordination between Rotary and the Govern- ment administration.  Recognize outstanding bureaucrats.  RELIGIOUSRELIGIOUSRELIGIOUSRELIGIOUSRELIGIOUS  Regular interaction with religious leaders of all faiths in general and resistant communities in particular.  Hold special workshops for religious leaders.  Sponsor appeals from religious leaders supporting / promoting the programme.  Recognise helpful religious leaders.  THROUGH MEDIA (PRINT & ELECTRONIC)THROUGH MEDIA (PRINT & ELECTRONIC)THROUGH MEDIA (PRINT & ELECTRONIC)THROUGH MEDIA (PRINT & ELECTRONIC)THROUGH MEDIA (PRINT & ELECTRONIC)  Involve representatives of the media including editors of news papers and other opinion makers effectively.
  17. 17. MOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATION  PolioPlus Workshops at different levels: Rotary District, Revenue District / Zonal for Rotary leaders and Partners in Service. Dis- trict Governor and DPPC and District Routine Immunization Co- ordinator must attend these workshops and motivate Rotarians effectively.  Social Mobilization: Special PolioPlus workshops for elected rep- resentatives, Medical Practitioners, teachers, health workers, religious leaders, labour organizations, Mahila mandals, youth clubs, self help groups and all those who can contribute to the success of the programme.  Publications / Communications: GML and all communications to have a strong message on Polio including updated Polio incidence scoreboard.  Special motivational letters to be addressed to Club leaders prior to NIDs and SNIDs.  All modes of communication including SMS to be effectively used for motivation of the Rotary parivar. Consider recognition of Rotary families active in Polio eradica-Consider recognition of Rotary families active in Polio eradica-Consider recognition of Rotary families active in Polio eradica-Consider recognition of Rotary families active in Polio eradica-Consider recognition of Rotary families active in Polio eradica- tion activities. Special District awards for outstanding Rotarytion activities. Special District awards for outstanding Rotarytion activities. Special District awards for outstanding Rotarytion activities. Special District awards for outstanding Rotarytion activities. Special District awards for outstanding Rotary families may be considered.families may be considered.families may be considered.families may be considered.families may be considered. IMPLEMENTATIONIMPLEMENTATIONIMPLEMENTATIONIMPLEMENTATIONIMPLEMENTATION The District PolioPlus Committee & District Routine Immunization com- mittee must be charged with effective implementation of the programme at different levels.  Coordination with Partner agencies: NPSP-WHO, UNICEF and the GOVERNMENT and specify the roles of each of them at differ- ent levels. Task force meetings provide the forum for this.
  18. 18.  IEC: Production and distribution of all publicity materials [Banners, Posters, vertical boards, caps, aprons, whistles, audio cassettes /CDs etc;] to Clubs and ensure proper utilization.  Positive media coverage through press conferences, press re- leases, Television, Radio including FM Channels, Advertisements, Rallies, Rath Yatras, Hoardings, Tableaux etc; Counter negative and hostile news about the programme. ROTARY CLUB LEVELROTARY CLUB LEVELROTARY CLUB LEVELROTARY CLUB LEVELROTARY CLUB LEVEL Every Rotary Club must constitute a core group of Rotarians to ensure effective implementation of all aspects of Polio Eradication programme. Every club should have a separate committee to ensure effective imple- mentation of Routine immunization. ADVOCACYADVOCACYADVOCACYADVOCACYADVOCACY MAKE POLIO ERADICATION A PEOPLE’S PROGRAMMEMAKE POLIO ERADICATION A PEOPLE’S PROGRAMMEMAKE POLIO ERADICATION A PEOPLE’S PROGRAMMEMAKE POLIO ERADICATION A PEOPLE’S PROGRAMMEMAKE POLIO ERADICATION A PEOPLE’S PROGRAMME POLITICALPOLITICALPOLITICALPOLITICALPOLITICAL  Involve the local political leaders including M.P., M.L.A., Corpora- tors, Municipal Councillors, Zilla/Taluk /Village Panchayat Mem- bers, labour leaders and all those who can influence the commu- nity in the programme. Sponsor appeals by local political leaders for NID through Handbills, local newspapers, and local radio sta- tions. Institute Polio awards on the lines of Vocational awards for outstanding support. BUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATICBUREAUCRATIC  Confer with the local administration [health and general] and de- fine the roles of each.
  19. 19.  The Task Force [both Pulse Polio and routine immunization] must be activated. Attend the task force meetings and help in mapping communication gaps and other deficiencies and evolve area specific social mobilization strategies.  Micro planning should be reviewed.  Recognize important bureaucrats by special polio awards. RELIGIOUSRELIGIOUSRELIGIOUSRELIGIOUSRELIGIOUS  Regular interaction with religious leaders of all faiths in general and resistantcommunitiesinparticular.Holdspecialworkshopsforreligious leaders and involve them in planning. Motivate religious leaders to issue appeals for immunization. Local Imams to appeal during Friday prayers and every day from the mosques. Encourage reli- gious leaders to refute false rumors and myths. Recognise lead- ers supporting the programme. WOMEN’S FORUMSWOMEN’S FORUMSWOMEN’S FORUMSWOMEN’S FORUMSWOMEN’S FORUMS  like State Women’s Commission, Women’s Colleges and women organizations. MOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATIONMOTIVATION Rotarians must be motivated throughout the year through backdrop banners at ClubmeetingsandamessageonPolioineverycommunicationoftheClublikeclub bulletins.  Club level workshop [One month before the NID] to motivate ev- ery Rotary family for the programme. Role and responsibility of each Rotarian must be identified in this workshop. Partners in Service, Government officers, teachers, Representatives from Madrasas, NSS, to be invited for the workshop.
  20. 20.  Social mobilization: Special workshops for religious leaders, medi- cal practitioners, elected representatives, labour organizations, Self Help Groups, Mahila Mandals, Youth Clubs to be organized to involve them in the programme.  Motivate teachers, religious leaders, local dadas, Youth Club mem- bers, labour leaders, faith and traditional healers, Presidents of Resident Welfare Associations, all elected representatives of the area and any influential person of the area to participate in the campaign.  Publicity: Rallies, Rath yatras, Hoardings, Tableaux, Mike announce- ments etc.  Organise special publicity at Festivals, exhibitions and all public gatherings  Positive media coverage: Press, TV, local cable network, radio to be utilized effectively Initiate immediate response to hostile and negative pub-Initiate immediate response to hostile and negative pub-Initiate immediate response to hostile and negative pub-Initiate immediate response to hostile and negative pub-Initiate immediate response to hostile and negative pub- licitylicitylicitylicitylicity IMPLEMENTATIONIMPLEMENTATIONIMPLEMENTATIONIMPLEMENTATIONIMPLEMENTATION Ultimately it is the individual Rotary Club which implements the programme and reaches the community. The goal should be 100% immunization with 100% participation. BEFORE THE NID/SNIDBEFORE THE NID/SNIDBEFORE THE NID/SNIDBEFORE THE NID/SNIDBEFORE THE NID/SNID  Identify the area of operation of each Club and identify the Immu- nization Booths in the area. Mark High Risk Areas within the territory selected by the Club. Involve all agencies to ensure inten- sive coverage of HRAs.
  21. 21.  Publicize the programme by effective use of IEC Materials: Ban- ners at the booths, Vertical boards and posters on the road lead- ing to the booth, audio cassettes / CDs for repeated miking, cin- ema slides and door - to - door campaign by volunteers.  Focus on High Risk Areas and design special campaigns.  Identify migratory and out of reach communities including transit points and plan to cover them.  Fix individual Rotarians in charge of the Booths and transit points.  Coordinate with the partner agencies at every stage and share the responsibility.  Associate the Rotary families. BOOTH DAYBOOTH DAYBOOTH DAYBOOTH DAYBOOTH DAY  Create a festive atmosphere in the booths.  Encourage volunteers to visit houses in the area for a house - to- house Canvassing.  Encourage launching of the booths by local leaders.  Ensure cold chain is maintained. Vaccine Vial Monitors (VVM) is a good guide for the functioning of the cold chain.  Convince people to bring the children to the booths by intensive campaigning.  Make sure booths open on time and function till late in the evening.  Ensure adequate vaccine supply at all times. Proper networking is necessary.  Monitor maintenance of records and proper finger marking.  Inform parents about the next NID and also the importance of routine immunization.  Provide transport support wherever necessary.
  22. 22.  Provide refreshments / food packets to the vaccinators and vol- unteers if necessary.  Make sure all transit points and migratory populations are cov- ered.  Associate the Rotary families. For Bihar - Guidelines for booth activities are not relevant since there are no immunization booths. Rotary clubs and Rotarians will have to focus their attention on High Risk Areas, resistant families and pockets and persuade them to accept immunization. Cold chain maintenance has to be supported wherever necessary. HOUSE-TO-HOUSE IMMUNIZATIONHOUSE-TO-HOUSE IMMUNIZATIONHOUSE-TO-HOUSE IMMUNIZATIONHOUSE-TO-HOUSE IMMUNIZATIONHOUSE-TO-HOUSE IMMUNIZATION  Ensure that micro plans of the area are available with the vaccinators.  Assist in transport, maintenance of cold chain, vaccine supply.  Ensure proper marking of the houses [P. X etc;] and conversion of X houses.  Help in overcoming resistance.  Make sure all High Risk Areas are properly covered.  Associate RCCs, Rotractors/Interactors and local NGOs. AFTER THE BOOTH DAYAFTER THE BOOTH DAYAFTER THE BOOTH DAYAFTER THE BOOTH DAYAFTER THE BOOTH DAY  HoldfeedbackmeetingsandplanforthenextNID/SNID.  Publicize success stories in the media and Rotary communica- tions like GML, and share the same with INPPC and the local officers.  Arrange special recognitions for sincere workers and volunteers.
  23. 23. MOP UP AND OUTBREAK RESPONE IMMUNIZATIONSMOP UP AND OUTBREAK RESPONE IMMUNIZATIONSMOP UP AND OUTBREAK RESPONE IMMUNIZATIONSMOP UP AND OUTBREAK RESPONE IMMUNIZATIONSMOP UP AND OUTBREAK RESPONE IMMUNIZATIONS Basically the same plan of action as detailed above should be implemented. AFP SURVEILLANCEAFP SURVEILLANCEAFP SURVEILLANCEAFP SURVEILLANCEAFP SURVEILLANCE  Emphasize importance of surveillance in Polio eradication strat- egy.  Encourage Rotarians to spread the message of AFP Surveillance in the Community.  Incorporate the AFP Surveillance activity in all communications and IEC materials. ROLE OF REVENUE DISTRICT COORDINATORS IN POLIOROLE OF REVENUE DISTRICT COORDINATORS IN POLIOROLE OF REVENUE DISTRICT COORDINATORS IN POLIOROLE OF REVENUE DISTRICT COORDINATORS IN POLIOROLE OF REVENUE DISTRICT COORDINATORS IN POLIO ERADICATIONERADICATIONERADICATIONERADICATIONERADICATION It is the responsibility of RDCs to ensure proper implementation of all the activities.  Organize revenue District PolioPlus and Routine Immunization workshops.  Attend Task force meetings and coordinate with the Government and other partners. Communicate with the Clubs on the deci- sions taken at the task force meetings.  Ensure proper usage of publicity materials supplied by the National Committee.  Allocate areas / booths to different clubs in the area. All HRAs to be covered.  Provide updated information on all polio matters to the Clubs. In Pursuance of the Delhi Commitment made at Polio SummitIn Pursuance of the Delhi Commitment made at Polio SummitIn Pursuance of the Delhi Commitment made at Polio SummitIn Pursuance of the Delhi Commitment made at Polio SummitIn Pursuance of the Delhi Commitment made at Polio Summit 2012 (25-26 Feb) each Rotary District Must focus on Routine2012 (25-26 Feb) each Rotary District Must focus on Routine2012 (25-26 Feb) each Rotary District Must focus on Routine2012 (25-26 Feb) each Rotary District Must focus on Routine2012 (25-26 Feb) each Rotary District Must focus on Routine ImmunizationImmunizationImmunizationImmunizationImmunization
  24. 24. For this, a formal Routine Immunization Structure is essential : Routine Immunization StructureRoutine Immunization StructureRoutine Immunization StructureRoutine Immunization StructureRoutine Immunization Structure  DGshould: • Appoint a dedicated Routine Immunization Coordinator at the Rotary District Level. • Appoint dedicated Routine Immunization coordinators at the Revenue District level (RDC).  Each Club President should: • Appoint dedicated Routine Immunization co-coordinators at the Club level Routine Immunization Training SessionsRoutine Immunization Training SessionsRoutine Immunization Training SessionsRoutine Immunization Training SessionsRoutine Immunization Training Sessions  Each Rotary District should organize a R.I. Training Workshop for all RDCs and Club coordinators. Rapport with Government and PartnersRapport with Government and PartnersRapport with Government and PartnersRapport with Government and PartnersRapport with Government and Partners TheRotaryDistrict,RDCandClubsmustworkinclosecollaborationwithlocalGovt. officials,WHOandUNICEF. Strengthening Routine Immunization PlanStrengthening Routine Immunization PlanStrengthening Routine Immunization PlanStrengthening Routine Immunization PlanStrengthening Routine Immunization Plan The following activities are suggested by Club Coordinator:-  Identify weak Routine Immunization areas & plan activities to improve upon the areas.  Find out planned R.I. Sessions in each area from CMO/DIO/ M&IC
  25. 25.  The R.I. Session is held and planned.  The Session is held for the designated hours.  There were adequate syringes.  Thereweresufficientvaccinesforallthe diseases.  The Cold-Chain was maintained.  There was wide publicity in the area to highlight that R.I. Session is planned.  Ensureallchildrenarevaccinated.  Immunization card is maintained and handed over to parents.  Nextimmunization/vaccinationisinformedtotheparent. Theaboveareonlygeneralguidelines.EachRotaryClub/Districtisencouragedto evolveareaspecificstrategieswiththeultimateaimof100%Immunization. India National PolioPlus Committee’s Communication/SocialIndia National PolioPlus Committee’s Communication/SocialIndia National PolioPlus Committee’s Communication/SocialIndia National PolioPlus Committee’s Communication/SocialIndia National PolioPlus Committee’s Communication/Social Mobilisation StrategyMobilisation StrategyMobilisation StrategyMobilisation StrategyMobilisation Strategy  Political Advocacy at national, state, revenue district and block levels.  Formation of Muslim Ulema Committee in U.P. comprising of senior Muslim scholars (including a doctor from Aligarh Muslim University Medical College) and religious leaders to address is- sues of resistance amongst Muslim population and appeal Mus- lim parents to immunize their children against Polio. Trustee TRF & Member IPPC Ashok Mahajan is the Chairman of this Commit- tee.  Dissemination of information & distribution of Information Educa- tion and Communication material.  Use of Audio-Visual Medium; local Radio channels, local cable net- work, films, slide shows, playing of audio cassettes.  Use of Traditional Media including street theatre (nukkad natak), puppet shows and other traditional media.
  26. 26.  Encouraging community participation to encourage community leaders and medical practitioners to take action.  Involving local Schools, Colleges and Universities, other Educa- tional Institutions, Women’s Organisations and Corporate Sec- tor participation.  Involving religious leaders and opinion makers.  Organising events such as, film screening, plays and seminars on polio.  Involving celebrities in the Polio eradication cause .  Regular media participation and coverage for a positive impact.  Workshop activities/seminars to bring new advocates on board.  Recognising health officials for outstanding performance.  Forming committee of underserved community members to ad- dress their issues. Strategies successfully employed by the India National PolioPlusStrategies successfully employed by the India National PolioPlusStrategies successfully employed by the India National PolioPlusStrategies successfully employed by the India National PolioPlusStrategies successfully employed by the India National PolioPlus Committee in the past:Committee in the past:Committee in the past:Committee in the past:Committee in the past:  Launching an IEC blitzkrieg on a massive scale on each NID/SNID including distribution of banners, posters, leaflets, sunshades, T-shirts, face masks, whistles, slides, hoardings, vertical boards, audio cassettes, Pencil et al.  Special initiatives in U.P. - Interpersonal Communication through Village Volunteers Network.  Air-dropping of IEC material from helicopters.  Involving celebrities from the entertainment world along with In- dian Cricket/ Tennis Stars.  INPPC has been instrumental in involving Indian and Pakistani cricketers for the cause.
  27. 27.  Media Campaign involving Bollywood celebrities, their messages on polio were aired on TV channels across the country.  Conducting Media Workshop in the endemic districts of U.P.  Extensive Print Media Campaign.  Advocacy with Foreign Ambassadors.  Rotary Polio Sena: Mobilising school children.  Rotary Polio Sa-re-gama: weekly program on FM Delhi.  Broadcast of spots on All India Radio in UP with polio messages of Muslim scholars, parents of polio victims and Bollywood celebri- ties.  Rotary Road shows - Rotary Polio Video vans showing films on Polio.  Rotary rallies and organizing childrens’ marches prior to NIDs/ SNIDs to create awareness.  Involving Educational Institutions like Aligarh Muslim University, Jamia Hamdard University and Jamia Millia Islamia University.  Conducted Polio Corrective Surgery & Rehabilitation Camps in endemic areas of UP, Bihar, Uttaranchal & West Bengal.  Involving religious leaders like Imams, Ulemas, Priests, Saints and Fathers.  Popularising Pulse Polio Campaign in Shopping Plazas/malls in metro cities.  Distribution of Comic Books on polio and sanitation in Hindi lan- guage in schools of U.P.  Distribution of Teachers’ booklets on polio.  Involving Corporate Sector participation.
  28. 28.  Incentive to health workers to overcome fatigue were provided in the state of U.P. and Bihar - Towel, Umbrella, Lunch Boxes, Torches etc.  Garden Umbrellas were provided in Delhi, U.P. & Maharashtra during summer to health workers.  An emergent support of Marker Pen in Bihar and vaccine carrier in Bihar, Delhi & Maharashtra were provided.  Produced a cartoon film for the community on polio awareness.  Support to NGOs to cover the population at construction sites.  Aprons were provided to the transit team health workers as iden- tification mark.  Involved Vice Chancellor of various Universities for effective So- cial Mobilisation and overcoming doubts.  Specially designed Rotary Polio Tableaux.  Display of gigantic hot air balloons.  Display of banners / vertical boards at all the retail outlets of HPCL/BPCL/IOC in the NCR region and UP.  Muppet shows (Polio Inflatables) in various districts of the en- demic States.  Forming State & District level Council of Muslim Ulemas & Schol- ars to address issues of the Muslim population.  Organising events like ‘Empathy –2004’ to sensitise the masses.  Recognising the political & religious leaders, bureaucrats & health officials.  Setting up booths on boats in the holy Kumbh mela to immunise children.  Organizing medical health camps in the state of Delhi, U.P and Bihar.
  29. 29.  Production of IEC material on Zinc and ORS.  Elocution competition for Schools all over the Country to create awareness among students  Stole & Flag on ‘End Polio Now’ distributed Health CampsHealth CampsHealth CampsHealth CampsHealth Camps The Polio virus today is endemic in just threethreethreethreethree countries –Pakistan, Nigeria and Pakistan [India has become non –endemic since February 2012]. According to WHO & Public Health experts, one of the reasons for the persistence of Polio virus in India for a long time was due to the poor environmental and demographic factors. These factors according to them contribute in the longevity of the virus and under- minethegoaloferadicationdespitemonumentaleffortsbeingundertakentoreach thesechildrenwiththevaccineandthesuccessachievedsofar.Insuchascenario, the community at large and especially the underserved population in the country are left with serious health needs. Access to health care is at times very poor and rare.TheGovernmentalhealthcentersthatarefunctioningareoverwhelmedwith numbers leading to dismal care and treatment. The INPPC believes that organizing free general health camps will help address concerns of citizens grappling with not just Polio but other health care needs that have been aggravated as a direct result of poor environmental and demographic factorssuchaspopulationdensity,contaminateddrinkingwater,malnourishment, unhygienicsanitaryconditionsetc. The free health camps that INPPC organized earlier - individually as well as jointly with sponsorssponsorssponsorssponsorssponsors - were a great success in building goodwill amongst the population they served. It not only helped dispel the cloud of apprehen- sion amongst population but created a favourable environment for Polio
  30. 30. immunization services paving way for greater acceptance of the polio vac- cine and eliminating resistance in underserved-population. The INPPC believes that more free-health camps in regions where Polio virus finds ground as well as the in underserved areas will help strengthen the fight against Polio by helping the population meet their other health demands. Corporate SupportCorporate SupportCorporate SupportCorporate SupportCorporate Support CorporatetodayworldoverarepartneringwithRotaryInternationalintheirbiggest humanitarian initiative to rid the world of Polio. In a major boost to the eradication campaign, Bill Gates of Microsoft through his foundation the Bill and Melinda Gates FoundationGates FoundationGates FoundationGates FoundationGates Foundation contributed a whopping US $ 355 million to Rotary for eradication efforts. Google.orgGoogle.orgGoogle.orgGoogle.orgGoogle.org, inspired by Rotary’s efforts donated a sum of US $ 3.5 million to the Polio eradication effort worldwide to Rotary Foundation. In India the Aditya Birla Group with its patron Smt. Rajashree Birla who is also an honorary member of Rotary Club Mumbai contributed US $ 6million. Ms. Usha Mittal and Mr. Laxmi Mittal of ArcellorMittal Group have donated to Rotary a total contribution of USD1.5milliontowardsPolioeradicationfunds.WhereasRotarianHarshadMehta Chairman of Rosy Blue Diamond has contributed a sum of US $ 3 million. Abbott India a Pharmaceutical Company has supported social mobilization efforts - health camps. SimilarlymanyotherCorporategroupssupportedthecampaigninkind.EasyMart (Airtel Retail chain), Dominos Pizza, local cellular network and many more have helped in endorsing the message of Polio immunization through their network and products. Rotarians and Rotary Clubs should engage local business man, industries to boost the campaign with their support.
  31. 31. Gates Foundation Challenge GrantGates Foundation Challenge GrantGates Foundation Challenge GrantGates Foundation Challenge GrantGates Foundation Challenge Grant The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation contributed US $ 355 million to The Rotary Foundation in 2009. Rotary International committed to match US$ 200 million against this challenge grant by June 2012. Rotarians across the world swung into action to raise this amount through various individual funds to Club, District and also through fund raising activities. US$ 228 million against the challenge have been raised till January 2012. In Janu- ary, 2012, The Gates Foundation recognising Rotary’s achievements an- nounced to contribute an additional US$ 50 million for Polio eradication. Emergency Preparedness and Response PlanEmergency Preparedness and Response PlanEmergency Preparedness and Response PlanEmergency Preparedness and Response PlanEmergency Preparedness and Response Plan The Government of India has constituted a “Central Emergency Prepared- ness and Response Group” to ensure adequate preparedness for a rapid response and manage the actual response to the detection of a wild polio- virus anywhere in India. The group is chaired by the Secretary, Health & Family Welfare, Government of India and comprise of senior officials from Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (GoI), and representatives of Na- tional Polio Surveillance Project (NPSP) – WHO, UNICEF and Rotary.  Each state has constituted a State Emergency Preparedness and Response Group chaired by the Principle Secretary (Health & Fam- ily Welfare) and comprised of senior officials from the State Gov- ernment such as the Director Health Services, State EPI Officer and other nominated senior government officials. State represen- tatives of WHO-NPSP, UNICEF and Rotary are a part of the group. This group should monitor the preparedness and implementation of the mop up.  Undertake a risk analysis, in coordination with WHO- NPSP offi- cials, to identify districts/ blocks/urban areas at high risk of im- portation and spread of poliovirus.
  32. 32.  Rotary International: provides support to the advocacy at the state and district levels and to the communication strategy and social mobilization activities.  Rotary Districts will have to make sure this structure of Emer- gency Preparedness and Response plan is proactive for any emer- gency situation. Rotary’s Role in Emergency Preparedness and Response PlanRotary’s Role in Emergency Preparedness and Response PlanRotary’s Role in Emergency Preparedness and Response PlanRotary’s Role in Emergency Preparedness and Response PlanRotary’s Role in Emergency Preparedness and Response Plan  Advocacy at state and distrcit levels for quality implementation of polio eradication activities.  Support IEC/Social mobilization activities & media management in coordinationwithGovt.,UNICEFandNPSP.  Anyotheressentialemergencysupportactivities. New Personalized Branding of the Polio CommunicationsNew Personalized Branding of the Polio CommunicationsNew Personalized Branding of the Polio CommunicationsNew Personalized Branding of the Polio CommunicationsNew Personalized Branding of the Polio Communications ApproachApproachApproachApproachApproach From EveryEveryEveryEveryEvery Child, Every Time to YourYourYourYourYour Child, Every Time to MyMyMyMyMy Child, Every Time
  33. 33. Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) of the Global Polio Eradica-Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) of the Global Polio Eradica-Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) of the Global Polio Eradica-Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) of the Global Polio Eradica-Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) of the Global Polio Eradica- tion Initiativetion Initiativetion Initiativetion Initiativetion Initiative Executive Summary (October 2013)Executive Summary (October 2013)Executive Summary (October 2013)Executive Summary (October 2013)Executive Summary (October 2013) Last year, 2012, was a good year in the history of polio eradication. The virus was confined to just five countries – a record low. The global inci- dence of polio also hit an all-time low, with just 223 cases in the entire year (down from 650 in the previous year, and from 350,000 when the Program began in 1988). Progress in 2013 has been far less positive.Experience over the Program’s 25-year history shows that stopping polio transmission demands excel- lence in three activities:  Sustained reductions in polio circulation, and improvements in program performance, within endemic countries.  Rapidly extinguishing any outbreaks that occur  Preventing outbreaks in countries that are clearly vulnerable to them In 2013, the program has hit unprecedented challenges in delivering the first of these imperatives, and fallen short on both the second and third. RecommendationsRecommendationsRecommendationsRecommendationsRecommendations As in previous reports, the IMB makes a series of recommendations aimed at strengthening the program at global and country level. These flow from our analysis of the extent to which the program is on course to interrupt transmission of polio by the end of 2014, as it pledged to do. These cover areas where the IMB has previously recommended action but there has been no satisfactory response, as well as new areas.
  34. 34. ConclusionConclusionConclusionConclusionConclusion Unprecedented challenges loom over the polio eradication program. There is shocking violence to which no public health program should ever be sub- jected. Bans prevent the program from vaccinating two million children against polio in Pakistan and Somalia. The program has dealt with insecu- rity before (and continues to do so) but these are different phenomena. All who support the eradication of the second ever disease for humankind should have no greater priority than seeking to resolve them. The program has far from perfect control in such circumstances. Whilst we are sympathetic to the challenge that this creates, it is more impor- tant than ever that the program’s performance be as eradication-ready – as worthy of a global public health emergency – as it can be in the many aspects that are within its control. There are too many instances in which this is not the case. The perfor- mance issues to be addressed are illustrated by (but not limited to) the fact that the Horn of Africa was not better protected against an outbreak and that too many other countries remain vulnerable. They are illustrated too by the response in the Horn of Africa, which could not be described as a robust response to a public health emergency of global health importance. It is also important to realise that too many suboptimal campaigns con- tinue in each of Afghanistan, Nigeria and Pakistan, even in areas where insecurity is not a major feature. As the program enters what is supposed to be the last low season in which polio circulates, we ask ourselves (as should all within the program): it this a program that is eradication-ready? Does what we are seeing really look like a programmatic emergency for global public health? Is the leadership and chain of command properly aligned to the challenges of today? This report identifies too many ways in which this is not the case.
  35. 35. The goal of stopping polio transmission by the end of 2014 now stands at serious risk. This situation must be turned round with the greatest pos- sible urgency. All but 0.1% of polio has been eradicated globally: there were 350 000 cases in 1988; there have been just 175 so far in 2012. Polio is more tightly confined than ever before –affecting just 94 districts in 4 countries to date this year. The Programme is benefiting from an unprecedented level of priority and commitment, much of it stemming from the World Health Assembly dec- laration of polio eradication as an emergency for global public health. How- ever, the goal of the 2010– 2012 Strategic Plan, to stop global polio trans- mission by the end of 2012, will not be achieved. Although the Programme has missed another deadline, the IMB judges its prospects to be more positive than in the past. If the recent level of progress had been achieved from the start of the 2010–2012 period, transmission could have been stopped by 2012. History shows that polio resurges more easily than it is contained. There is a significant risk of having more polio cases in 2013 than in 2012, and in more countries. The Programme must receive a level of priority not only to mitigate this risk, but to achieve another year of major progress towards stopping transmission. Each country will be able to stop polio transmission if its leaders, at every level, embrace the mission to protect their country’s children from the threat of poliomyelitis. The word “ownership” encapsulates what is required, as exemplified by India: not wanting to continue harbouring a virus that has been vanquished in most countries of the world, the Indian government and people seized ownership of the polio eradication effort and as a direct consequence, transmission has been interrupted in India for the first time in its history.
  36. 36. India:India:India:India:India: The Indian Programme is looking at the question of legacy – of what should come next. The challenge of stopping polio in India was unprecedented, requiring the construction of a sophisticated programme. This has cre- ated valuable assets – human, organizational, logistical, and reputational – whose great value must be captured for the greater health of India’s people. At a Glance:At a Glance:At a Glance:At a Glance:At a Glance:  Pride of the Programme – Polio-free India. But the risk of importation remains  A great legacy for public health – if managed correctly  India supporting the remaining endemic countries  India’s emergency response plans must be top-drawer In India, maintaining the country’s hard-earned polio-free status is crucial. The IMB’s recommendation of simulation exercises to test the readiness of its emergency response plans has been tested with satisfaction. RISKS AND CHALLENGESRISKS AND CHALLENGESRISKS AND CHALLENGESRISKS AND CHALLENGESRISKS AND CHALLENGES  Complacency / Programme fatigue  StrengtheningofSocialMobilisation  Routine Immunisation status  Movement of migratory population within Country  Sustain high level immunisation during (SIAs) Supplementary ImmunizationActivity  FundingGap  GovernmentCommitment
  37. 37. Last wild polio case Last OPV2 use 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 Certification Virus detection & interruption Polio Eradication & Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018Polio Eradication & Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018Polio Eradication & Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018Polio Eradication & Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018Polio Eradication & Endgame Strategic Plan 2013-2018 OPV Campaigns Technical Assistance Quality Improvement/ Community Mobilization Surveillance/Laboratory Emergency Response Indirect Costs Research & Development IPV in Routine Immunization 201820172016201520142013 760771 904 1,0031,0331,054 Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan Budget (US$ Millions) Funding the Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan will costFunding the Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan will costFunding the Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan will costFunding the Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan will costFunding the Eradication and Endgame Strategic Plan will cost the global community US$5.5 billion,the global community US$5.5 billion,the global community US$5.5 billion,the global community US$5.5 billion,the global community US$5.5 billion, which will be raised from multiple sources—including existing and new donors—and through innovative financing mechanisms. A 2010 study published in Vaccine estimated that the GPEI’s efforts could save the world $40–50 billion.
  38. 38. Media And Polio Eradication Program:Media And Polio Eradication Program:Media And Polio Eradication Program:Media And Polio Eradication Program:Media And Polio Eradication Program: The press has enormous influential power and an extremely delicate and important role to play in implementing development programmes related to human health, education etc, in the society. Consistent and compre- hensive networking with media at all levels will be crucial for putting immunisation program back on the political agenda and to support strate- gies for behavioural change as well as image building. Taking media intoTaking media intoTaking media intoTaking media intoTaking media into confidence is crucial in avoiding / countering negative and hos-confidence is crucial in avoiding / countering negative and hos-confidence is crucial in avoiding / countering negative and hos-confidence is crucial in avoiding / countering negative and hos-confidence is crucial in avoiding / countering negative and hos- tile publicity for the Polio Eradication programme.tile publicity for the Polio Eradication programme.tile publicity for the Polio Eradication programme.tile publicity for the Polio Eradication programme.tile publicity for the Polio Eradication programme. Rotarian must also educate/inform the general public about rotary being the initiator of campaign. NID NID 0 Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov Jan Mar May Polio Endgame Strategy-India, Potential Timeline 2011 2012 2013 2014 Last WPV case Polio certification IPV intro? NID NID tOPV NID Post- switch VDPV type 2 risk mgt. tOPV- bOPV switch NID NID NID NID Certification standard surveillance, improved RI coverage Modelling, Research, Development
  39. 39. Rotary International’s PolioPlus Program in the media:Rotary International’s PolioPlus Program in the media:Rotary International’s PolioPlus Program in the media:Rotary International’s PolioPlus Program in the media:Rotary International’s PolioPlus Program in the media:  District/Rotary Clubs should execute the following:District/Rotary Clubs should execute the following:District/Rotary Clubs should execute the following:District/Rotary Clubs should execute the following:District/Rotary Clubs should execute the following:  Review mechanisms for regular/wide dissemination of informa- tion to the press.  Prepare resource materials for public & media showing the achievement of the polio eradication initiative - regionally and na- tionally.  Make NIDs and other immunization activities relevant to the im- portant constituencies.  Convince that polio eradication makes economic sense.  Demonstrate that the polio eradication strategy is feasible to reach the goal.  Project the benefits of polio eradication to health sector develop- ment and infrastructure building.  Demonstrate the consequences of inaction.  Identify and use cultural and sports icons to sustain media, corpo- rate and political commitment for immunization.  Make media understand the role it can play in this endeavour.  Highlight other social & goodwill activities/event supported by Rotary INPPC  Inform/educate the media that Rotary took the challenge & led in launching the GPEI in 1988 to end polio globally. Initiate immediate response to negative and hostile publicity.Initiate immediate response to negative and hostile publicity.Initiate immediate response to negative and hostile publicity.Initiate immediate response to negative and hostile publicity.Initiate immediate response to negative and hostile publicity. Poliomyelitis – Understanding the DiseasePoliomyelitis – Understanding the DiseasePoliomyelitis – Understanding the DiseasePoliomyelitis – Understanding the DiseasePoliomyelitis – Understanding the Disease  Poliomyelitis, the disease commonly known as Polio, causes irre- versible paralysis.
  40. 40.  The disease caused by the virus is commonly known as Polio vi- rus. It is of 3 types - P1, P2 & P3. P2 was eradicated from the world in 1999.  Polio affects children mostly under 5 years of age.  Poliovirus enters the bodies of children through contaminated food and water.  The virus spreads through contaminated food and water and trans- mission is faeco-oral.  It multiplies inside the intestines of the children.  In the final stages the virus enters the blood stream, attacks the nervous system and destroys the nerve cells of the spinal cord, thus causing paralysis on a few occasions the infection may be fatal.  Once destroyed, the nerve cells cannot regenerate.  The onset of paralysis is sudden and rapid. The paralysed limbs are floppy or flaccid. It is the major cause of Acute Flaccid Paraly- sis (AFP).  Less than 1% of the infected children get AFP. The 99% infected children without paralysis are carriers of infection and are more dangerous to others as they transmit the infection silently. PreventionPreventionPreventionPreventionPrevention  Polio is non curable but preventable through vaccines. At present Polio is being prevented through immunisation by giving Oral Po- lio Vaccine (OPV) or by injecting Inactivated Polio Vaccine (IPV). The disease can be eradicated completely only through mass vaccination with OPV.
  41. 41. Types of VaccineTypes of VaccineTypes of VaccineTypes of VaccineTypes of Vaccine ORAL POLIO VACCINE [OPV].ORAL POLIO VACCINE [OPV].ORAL POLIO VACCINE [OPV].ORAL POLIO VACCINE [OPV].ORAL POLIO VACCINE [OPV].  Oral Polio Vaccine popularly called OPV is live attenuated (weak- ened) Polio virus developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in 1961.  Given orally, OPV produces antibodies in the blood to all three types of poliovirus.  OPV also produces a local immune response in the lining [‘mu- cous membrane’] of the intestines - the primary site for poliovirus multiplication [Gut Immunity]. The antibodies limit the multiplica- tion of ‘wild’ [naturally occurring] virus inside the gut, preventing effective infection. This intestinal immune response to OPV is the main reason for the high efficacy of OPV in stopping person to person transmission of wild polio virus in mass campaigns. OPV is available in three forms:OPV is available in three forms:OPV is available in three forms:OPV is available in three forms:OPV is available in three forms:  Trivalent vaccine ‘tOPV’ against all 3 virus types.  Monovalent OPV1 and monovalent OPV3 targeting strains P1 and P3 respectively.  Bivalent (bOPV) vaccine targeting two strains P1 and P3. INACTIVATED POLIO VACCINE [IPV]INACTIVATED POLIO VACCINE [IPV]INACTIVATED POLIO VACCINE [IPV]INACTIVATED POLIO VACCINE [IPV]INACTIVATED POLIO VACCINE [IPV]  ‘IPV’ is an inactivated (killed) polio vaccine developed by Dr. Jonas Salk in 1955.  IPV has to be injected by a trained health worker.  ‘IPV’ works by producing protective antibodies in the blood [Serum Immunity].  IPV induces very low levels of immunity to poliovirus inside the gut. As a result ‘IPV’ provides individual protection against polio paralyssis but, unlike OPV, cannot prevent the spread of wild polio virus.
  42. 42.  When a person immunized with IPV is infected with wild polio virus, virus can still multiply inside the intestines and be shed in stools – risking continued circulation. For this reason, OPV is the vaccine of choice wherever a polio outbreak needs to be contained, even in countries which rely exclusively on IPV for their routine immunization programme. Vaccine of choice: India CampaignVaccine of choice: India CampaignVaccine of choice: India CampaignVaccine of choice: India CampaignVaccine of choice: India Campaign  OPV is the vaccine choice for eradication in India and other endemic countries.  OPV is proven to provide very high gut immunity rapidly and inter- rupt Poliovirus in the tropical, developing settings like India. Short term shedding of vaccine virus in the stools of recently immu- nized children results in passive immunization of persons within close contact.  IPV is costlier than OPV [Over five times + the cost of the sy- ringe]. - A major constrain considering the massive quantities of vaccine required for use during National and Sub National Immu- nization days in India.  OPV is oral and can be easily administered by vaccinators. It does not need sterile injection, equipments and trained health work- ers. Significant Target Population – missed every year – Why?Significant Target Population – missed every year – Why?Significant Target Population – missed every year – Why?Significant Target Population – missed every year – Why?Significant Target Population – missed every year – Why?  Poor Routine Immunisation levels.  Lack of information, misconceptions, rumours, lack of faith, reli- gious and social beliefs and lack of motivation.
  43. 43.  Resistance from a few communities demanding better health care and civic facilities as a consequence.  Migratory population and outreach residents.  Programfatigueandcomplacencyatgrass-rootslevel. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)  Why so many doses?Why so many doses?Why so many doses?Why so many doses?Why so many doses?  For universal coverage on a single day.  To help build-up sustained immunity.  To stop circulation of the Wild virus.  Will not so many polio drops harm my child?Will not so many polio drops harm my child?Will not so many polio drops harm my child?Will not so many polio drops harm my child?Will not so many polio drops harm my child?  Not at all. Polio drops are safe. They provide additional protection.  Won’t it be too early to bring my child for Polio immuniza-Won’t it be too early to bring my child for Polio immuniza-Won’t it be too early to bring my child for Polio immuniza-Won’t it be too early to bring my child for Polio immuniza-Won’t it be too early to bring my child for Polio immuniza- tion tomorrow, as he got routine polio vaccine last weektion tomorrow, as he got routine polio vaccine last weektion tomorrow, as he got routine polio vaccine last weektion tomorrow, as he got routine polio vaccine last weektion tomorrow, as he got routine polio vaccine last week only?only?only?only?only?  You can even take your child for polio drops the very next day, as there is no minimum interval for pulse polio drops.  To whom should we report a case of paralysis?To whom should we report a case of paralysis?To whom should we report a case of paralysis?To whom should we report a case of paralysis?To whom should we report a case of paralysis?  You should immediately report all suspected cases to the nearest Primary Health Centre or Chief Medical Officer or Surveillance Medical Officer, NPSP - WHO.  Is polio caused by poor hygiene and external environment?Is polio caused by poor hygiene and external environment?Is polio caused by poor hygiene and external environment?Is polio caused by poor hygiene and external environment?Is polio caused by poor hygiene and external environment?  Yes. Unhygienic conditions are conducive to the spread of polio. Flies, open and unclean drains, accumulated garbage and poor personal hygiene increases the spread of the virus.  Is Polio hereditary?Is Polio hereditary?Is Polio hereditary?Is Polio hereditary?Is Polio hereditary?  No. It is caused by a virus, which can be transmitted by another Polio infected child.
  44. 44.  Now that Polio immunization is regularly organised, is Rou-Now that Polio immunization is regularly organised, is Rou-Now that Polio immunization is regularly organised, is Rou-Now that Polio immunization is regularly organised, is Rou-Now that Polio immunization is regularly organised, is Rou- tine Immunization necessary?tine Immunization necessary?tine Immunization necessary?tine Immunization necessary?tine Immunization necessary?  Absolutely. Routine Immunisation is very important. This gives personal protection to a child against polio. The purpose of polio immunization program is to flush out the polio-virus from the en- vironment.  If my child has fever, diarrhea or respiratory infection, canIf my child has fever, diarrhea or respiratory infection, canIf my child has fever, diarrhea or respiratory infection, canIf my child has fever, diarrhea or respiratory infection, canIf my child has fever, diarrhea or respiratory infection, can I still give an extra polio dose?I still give an extra polio dose?I still give an extra polio dose?I still give an extra polio dose?I still give an extra polio dose?  Yes. No disease or infections need stop polio vaccination.  If my child missed getting the polio dose at today’s PulseIf my child missed getting the polio dose at today’s PulseIf my child missed getting the polio dose at today’s PulseIf my child missed getting the polio dose at today’s PulseIf my child missed getting the polio dose at today’s Pulse Polio, can he get it tomorrow?Polio, can he get it tomorrow?Polio, can he get it tomorrow?Polio, can he get it tomorrow?Polio, can he get it tomorrow?  Yes, a child can get polio drops within the next 3-4 days during house-to-house campaign.  What if my child even after taking polio drops does notWhat if my child even after taking polio drops does notWhat if my child even after taking polio drops does notWhat if my child even after taking polio drops does notWhat if my child even after taking polio drops does not develop immunity to the disease?develop immunity to the disease?develop immunity to the disease?develop immunity to the disease?develop immunity to the disease?  It rarely happens. But cases where polio virus occurred even af- ter taking polio drops can be attributed to the highly unhygienic conditions prevailing in places, which favour non-polio enterovirus that reduces the effect of the vaccine. Diarrhea could also be one of the reasons. In malnourished children the vaccine does not produce adequate immunity level. For this, a child should be ad- ministered second, third and fourth rounds of polio doses to inac- tivate the virus and for diarrhea, Zinc tablets with ORS (Oral Re- hydration Salts) is advised.  Can polio vaccine prove fatal?Can polio vaccine prove fatal?Can polio vaccine prove fatal?Can polio vaccine prove fatal?Can polio vaccine prove fatal?  No, polio vaccine is very safe. It is a false rumour that a child died after taking polio drops. The reasons can be many for the death of the child and it is coincidental that he/she died after being given polio drops.
  45. 45. Questions and Answers on VDPV cases:Questions and Answers on VDPV cases:Questions and Answers on VDPV cases:Questions and Answers on VDPV cases:Questions and Answers on VDPV cases: Q) What is a vaccine-derived poliovirus (VDPV)? Vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) are rare but well-documented strains of poliovirus. VDPVs are strains of poliovirus which emerge after prolonged multiplication of attenuated strains of the virus con- tained in the oral polio vaccine (OPV) in the guts of children with immunodeficiency or in populations with very low immunity. After prolonged multiplication, these vaccine virus derived strains change and revert to a form that can cause paralysis in humans. Some VDPVs have shown a capacity for sustained circulation in communities. Q) What are the types of VDPVs? iVDPVs (immunodeficiency related vaccine-derived poliovirus) isolated from immunodeficient patients who have prolonged infections after exposure to OPV; cVDPVs (circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses) that are associated with sustained person-to-person transmission and considered to be circulating in the community under conditions of low population immunity; aVDPVs (ambiguous vaccine-derived poliovirus) are VDPVs with a currently unclassifiable source (ie a single isolate from a healthy or non-immunodeficient person; environmental isolate without an associated AFP case). Q) Why does this happen?
  46. 46. Low routine immunization coverage with tOPV, the vaccine which produces immunity against type 2 poliovirus also, eradication of wild poliovirus type 2 in 1999 which no longer circulating to provide natural immunity in the population, and the use of the more effective type specific monovalent oral polio vaccines – mOPV1/mOPV3 and now bivalent vaccine– in pulse polio campaign rounds in recent years. Q) Does VDPV Type 2 mean that wild poliovirus type 2 has not been eradicated? VDPV type 2 is NOT wild poliovirus type 2 which was eradicated in 1999. Q) How can a VDPV circulation be stopped? The management of VDPVs is a necessary part of the global polio eradication effort, and is similar to management of wild poliovirus outbreaks; i.e. by rapid implementation of high-quality SIAs. Global experience with VDPVs shows that they are less virulent than wild poliovirus strains, and can be rapidly stopped, with 2-3 rounds of high-quality, large-scale SIAs Q) What is being done in response to the VDPV in India? As per global norms following VDPV detection, the Government of India has initiated:  full investigation to determine the immunological and clinical status of each case, and implement any necessary follow up and laboratory investigations
  47. 47.  efforts to determine if transmission of the VDPV has occurred in the community;  assessment of population immunity in the immediate vicinity of the detected VDPV; and,  catch up routine immunization and if indicated, supplementary and mop-up immunization rounds using trivalent OPV in the affected area Q) Is OPV safe? OPV is extremely safe and effective at protecting children against lifelong polio paralysis. OPV is still and has always been the safest and most effective way to protect children from polio. OPV has been the vaccine of choice for over 195 coun tries that have successfully eradicated polio. It re- mains the Global Polio Eradication Initiative’s recommended vaccine of choice to finish global eradication More than 10 billion doses of OPV have been given to more than 2 billion children in the past ten years.
  48. 48. DRAFT AGENDA FOR DISTRICT POLIOPLUS ORIENTATION &DRAFT AGENDA FOR DISTRICT POLIOPLUS ORIENTATION &DRAFT AGENDA FOR DISTRICT POLIOPLUS ORIENTATION &DRAFT AGENDA FOR DISTRICT POLIOPLUS ORIENTATION &DRAFT AGENDA FOR DISTRICT POLIOPLUS ORIENTATION & PLANNING MEETPLANNING MEETPLANNING MEETPLANNING MEETPLANNING MEET ConvenorConvenorConvenorConvenorConvenor ::::: National Committee MemberNational Committee MemberNational Committee MemberNational Committee MemberNational Committee Member 10.00–10.05a.m. : WelcomebyDistrictGovernor 10.05–10.20a.m. : Rotary’s role in PolioPlus Program by National Committee Member – Advocacy, Social Mobilization, RotarianParticipation 10.20–10.35a.m. : Government’sperspectivebyPrincipalSecretary-Health /Director–RCH 10.35 – 11.35 a.m. : State /Area specific issues on Polio Programme and Routine Immunization by SMO, NPSP (WHO) Panel Discussion (NCM to lead the Discussion) (NPSP,UNICEF,CMO/DIO,IMA/IAPetctoparticipate) 11.35 – 11.50 a.m. : Tea/ Comfort BreakTea/ Comfort BreakTea/ Comfort BreakTea/ Comfort BreakTea/ Comfort Break 11.50–12.30p.m. : Advocacy with Politicians & Bureaucrats, religious leaders and harnessing the Media (NCM to lead the Discussion) Interactive Session – ‘Q&A’ 12.30 – 01.00 p.m. : Strengthening Routine Immunization: District Routine Immunization Coordinator/ Govt. Immunization official or IAP Representative 1.00 – 1.45 p.m. : LunchLunchLunchLunchLunch 1.45–2.15p.m. : How to motivate the Rotarians and Activities on Booth Day 2.15–3.15p.m. : Breakaway sessions - Revenue District Wise / Zone Wise : RevenueDistrictCoordinatorstolead. (Revenue District wise plans to be chalked out) NCM,DG,DPPCtoparticipate&guide 3.15–4.00p.m. : Concludingsessions  DG’sRemarks  DPPC’s Remarks
  49. 49. DRAFT AGENDA FORDRAFT AGENDA FORDRAFT AGENDA FORDRAFT AGENDA FORDRAFT AGENDA FOR DISTRICT WORKSHOP ON ROUTINEDISTRICT WORKSHOP ON ROUTINEDISTRICT WORKSHOP ON ROUTINEDISTRICT WORKSHOP ON ROUTINEDISTRICT WORKSHOP ON ROUTINE IMMUNIZATIONIMMUNIZATIONIMMUNIZATIONIMMUNIZATIONIMMUNIZATION ConvenorConvenorConvenorConvenorConvenor ::::: National Committee MemberNational Committee MemberNational Committee MemberNational Committee MemberNational Committee Member 10.00–10.05a.m. : WelcomebyDistrictGovernor 10.05–10.20a.m. : Brief by NPSP-WHO about the identified weak areas of Routine Immunization and other ways to improve RoutineImmunization 10.20–10.35a.m. : Address by State Government Officials – Principal Secretary/DirectorImmunization 10.35–11.35a.m. : PanelDiscussion–Panelists—NCM,DG,DistrictRIC, DPPC,SMO,IAP,StateGovt. 11.35 – 11.55 a.m. : Tea BreakTea BreakTea BreakTea BreakTea Break 11.55–12.55p.m. : BreakawaySession–RevenueDistrictwise/Zonewise to formulate Plan 12.55 – 01.15 p.m. : Concluding Remarks by DG Vote of Thanks by District Routine Immunization Coordinator (DRIC) 01.15p.m. : LunchLunchLunchLunchLunch Please Note: District are encouraged to organise Routine Immu-Please Note: District are encouraged to organise Routine Immu-Please Note: District are encouraged to organise Routine Immu-Please Note: District are encouraged to organise Routine Immu-Please Note: District are encouraged to organise Routine Immu- nization Workshop. No financial support is provided for RI Work-nization Workshop. No financial support is provided for RI Work-nization Workshop. No financial support is provided for RI Work-nization Workshop. No financial support is provided for RI Work-nization Workshop. No financial support is provided for RI Work- shop.shop.shop.shop.shop.  Open House  Vote of Thanks 4.00 p.m. : TeaTeaTeaTeaTea Please Note: The District Orientation and planning meet should be conducted on the lines of a workshop. Every opportunity should be given to the participants to participate.
  50. 50. GLOSSARYGLOSSARYGLOSSARYGLOSSARYGLOSSARY AcronymsAcronymsAcronymsAcronymsAcronyms  NID – NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION DAY  SNID – Sub-NATIONAL IMMUNIZATION DAY  NPSP – NATIONAL POLIO SURVEILLANCE PROJECT  VVM – VACCINE VIAL MONITOR  SIA – SUPPLEMENTARY IMMUNIZATION ACTIVITY  TOPV – TRIVALENT ORAL POLIO VACCINE  MOPV – MONOVALENT ORAL POLIO VACCINE  BOPV – BIVALENT ORAL POLIO VACCINE  INPPC – INDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE
  51. 51. Gary C.K. Huang Rotary International President One Rotary Center 1560, Sherman Avenue Evanston, IL USA. 60201-3698 Tel. : 1-847-866-3000 Fax : 1-847-866-3390 E-mail : gary.huang@rotary.org John Kenny Chairman, The Rotary Foundation Past President Rotary International Treetops, 4 Preston Hse.Gardens, Linlithgow, EH49 6PZ, Scotland Tel. (R) : 44-1506-843484 Fax : 44-1324-484275 E-mail : john.kenny@rotary.org John F. Germ Chairman,InternationalPolioPlusCommittee University Tower, 651 E. 4th St., Ste.600, Chattanooga, TN 37403, USA Tel. (R) : 1-423-842-6453 BUS : 1-423-267-9718 Fax : 1-423-265-7879 E-mail : johng@caengrs.com Rajendra K. Saboo Advisor IPPC, Past President Rotary International (1991-92) Kamla Centre, SCO 88-89,Sector - 8-C Chandigarh - 160018 Tel. (O) : 0172-2548223/2544379 Tel. (R) : 0172-2740332 Fax : 0172-2548302/2741129 E-mail : rksaboo@kddl.com Kalyan Banerjee Past President Rotary International (2011-12) Uniphos House, Chitrakar Dhurandhar Marg 11th Road, Khar(W), Mumbai - 400 052 Tel. (O) : 022-26049115 Tel. (R) : 022-25700812 Fax : 022-26041010 E-mail : banerjeekm@uniphos.com K. R. Ravindran Rotary International President - Elect Past Rotary International Director Print Care (Ceylon) Ltd. 77 Nungamugoda Rd., Kelaniya, Sri Lanka Tel (O) : 94-11-2912789 Tel (R) : 94-11-2573612 Fax : 94-11-2912790 E-mail : krr@printcare.lk, ravi4@sltnet.lk ROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERS
  52. 52. P. T. Prabhakar Rotary International Director 15 Sivaswami Street, Mylapore, Chennai, Tamil Nadu-600004 Tel. (O) : 044-28116661 Tel. (R) : 044-28111631 Mobile : 09840874787 E-mail : nalinip@vsnl.com, ptp@md4.vsnl.net.in Sushil Gupta Trustee-The Rotary Foundation Past Rotary International Director 4/11, Shanti Niketan New Delhi - 110 021 Tel. (O) : 011-26791004 / 234 Tel. (R) : 011-24115050 Fax : 011-24115050 E-mail : sushil.gupta@yahoo.co.in Sudarshan Agarwal Advisor- INPPC Past Rotary International Director C-312, Defence Colony New Delhi - 110 024 Tel. (R) : 011-24332676 E-mail : sud.agarwal@gmail.com M. K. Panduranga Setty Advisor- SEAR Past Rotary International Director 19, Platform Road Bangalore - 560 020, Karnataka Tel. (O) : 080-23467653 Tel. (R) : 080-26610695 Fax : 080-23317665 E-mail : pandusetty@yahoo.com settypandu@gmail.com Dr. P. C.Thomas Past Rotary International Director Goodshepherd International School Fernhill Post, Ootacamund - 643 004 Tamil Nadu Tel. (O) : 0423-2550371-77/2550866 Tel. (R) : 0423-2550555/2550666 Fax : 0423-2550877 E-mail : pcthomasgsis@gmail.com Ashok M. Mahajan Advisor- SEAR & INPPC Past Trustee-TRF & Member-IPPC Past Rotary International Director 1001, Marathan Galaxy, L.B.S. Marg, Mulund, Mumbai - 400080 Tel (O) : 022-25668929, 25674228 Tel (R) : 022-25686681, 25643944 Fax : 022-25664218 E-mail : ashokmahajan883@gmail.com ROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERS
  53. 53. Noraseth Pathmanand Past Rotary International Director Sinovest, 4/F Lake Rajada Off. Complex, 192/23 Rajadabhisek Rd., Klong Toey Bangkok, Thailand 10110 Tel (O) : 662 –2640251 Tel (R) : 662-3922376 /2640255 E-mail : noraseth@mozart.inet.co.th Shekhar Mehta Advisor- INPPC Past Rotary International Director 12, Sunny Park, Ashray Apt., Block ‘B’, Kolkatta - 700019 West Bengal Tel (O) : 033 -24863434, 24863435 Tel (R) : 033-24858093, 24858092 Mobile : 9831012901 E-mail : ridshekhar@gmail.com Y. P. Das Vice-Chairman, SEAR Past Rotary International Director 106 Railway Road Ambala Cantt – 133001, Haryana Tel (O) : 0171 – 2643134 /2644906 Tel (R) : 0171 – 2643164 Mobile : 9812038999 Fax : 0171 – 2643983 E-mail : yashpaldas@yahoo.com Dr. Manoj D. Desai Rotary International Director-Elect `Arpan’, 11, Sampatrao Colony Alkapuri, Vadodara - 390005 Gujarat Tel (O) : 0265-2343119 Tel (R) : 0265-2395951 Mobile : 9825317488 E-mail : pdgmanoj@yahoo.com ROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERSROTARY INTERNATIONAL GENERAL OFFICERS
  54. 54. CHAIRMAN PDG Deepak Kapur Gulab House, Mayapuri New Delhi – 110 064 Tel (O) : 011-28115312, 28115613 Tel (R) : 011-26515380 Mobile : 9810026955 Fax : 011-41848439 E-mail : delaae07@nda.vsnl.net.in dkapur@gowarsons.com ADVISORS Sudarshan Agarwal Past Rotary International Director C-312 Defence Colony New Delhi - 110 024 Tel. (R) : 011-24332676 E-mail : sud.agarwal@gmail.com VICE CHAIRMAN PDG Dr. P. Narayana Sharavati Nursing Home B.H. Road, Shimoga - 577 201, Karnataka Tel (O) : 08182-223560 Tel (R) : 08182-278693 Mobile : 9844137136 Fax : 08182-222496 E-mail : pnarayanaholla@gmail.com (R.I. Dist : 2980,3160, 3170, 3180, 3190) Shekhar Mehta Past Rotary International Director 12, Sunny Park, Ashray Apt., Block ‘B’, Kolkatta - 700019 West Bengal Tel (O) : 033 -24863434, 24863435 Tel (R) : 033-24858093, 24858092 Mobile : 9831012901 E-mail : ridshekhar@gmail.com Ashok M. Mahajan Past Trustee-TRF & Member-IPPC Past Rotary International Director 1001, Marathan Galaxy L.B.S. Marg, Mulund, Mumbai - 400080 Tel (O) : 022-25668929, 25674228 Tel (R) : 022-25686681, 25643944 Fax : 022-25664218 E-mail : ashokmahajan883@gmail.com INDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERS
  55. 55. INDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERS PDG Manjit Sawhney Chairman SEAR E-27, Anand Niketan New Delhi-110021 Tel (O) : 011-24110987 Tel (R) : 011-2411437 Mobile : 9810285437 E-mail : manjitsawhney04@gmail.com (R.I. Dist : 3010) PDG D. N. Padhi A 71, Sahid Nagar Bhubaneswar - 751007, Odisha Tel (R) : 0674-6539007 Mobile : 9437208007 E-mail : dn_padhi_ias@hotmail.com (R.I. Dist : 3040, 3261, 3262) PDG K. P. Kamaluddin General Manager The Western India Plywoods Ltd. Baliapatam, Cannanore - 670 010, Kerala Tel (O) : 0497-2778151 Tel (R) : 0497-2702101 Mobile : 9447796732 Fax : 0497-2778181 E-mail : westernply@gmail.com (R.I. Dist : 3201, 3202, 3211, 3212, 3230) Rtn Dr. B. N. Singh R K Avenue PO Rajendra Nagar, Nala Road Patna, Bihar 800016 Tel (O) : 06122721228 Tel (R) : 06122721538 Mobile : 09771421772 E-mail : bijaynarainsingh@gmail.com (R.I. Dist : 3250) PDG Raman Bhatia 143, Uday Park New Delhi - 110 049 Tel (O) : 011-26862606 Fax (R) : 011-26515935 Mobile : 9810027760 E-mail : ramanbhatia07@gmail.com (R.I. Dist : 3010) PDG Siddhartha S. Bose 22, Palace Court, 1 KYD Street, Kolkata, West Bengal - 700016 Tel (O) : 033-22292471 Tel (R) : 033-24640352 Mobile : 9830021021 E-mail : bosebari@yahoo.com (R.I. Dist : 3240, 3291)
  56. 56. INDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERS PDG Vinod K. Bhatia Automobile Mfg. Co. Ltd. 8-B, Heavy Ind. Area Jodhpur – 342003, Rajasthan Tel (O) : 0291-2740929/2755710 Tel (R) : 0291 –2756195 /2741930 Mobile : 9829022291 Fax : 0291-2741237/2741930 E-mail : vinodkbhatia@gmail.com (R.I. Dist : 3051, 3052, 3053, 3060) PDG Vijay Gupta VJG International Pvt. Ltd. D-14 & 15, Calibra Market, Rajpura-140401 (Punjab) Tel (O) : 01762-222429 Tel (R) : 01762-222722 Mobile : 9417039722 E-mail : vjg6700@yahoo.co.uk (R.I. Dist : 3070,3080,3090) PDG Dr. I. S. Tomer 35-A/2, Rampur Garden, Bareilly, Uttar Pradesh - 243001 Tel (O) : 0581 2567200 Tel (R) : 0581 2567300 Mobile : 09837071818 E-mail : istomer2006@yahoo.co.in (R.I. Dist : 3110) PDG Dr. Rajiv Pradhan Prerana, 77/3, Railway Lines Solapur 413 001, Maharashtra Tel (O) : 0217 2728242 Tel (R) : 0217 2627083 Mobile : 9822028989 Fax : 0217 2629575 E-mail : rajivuma@gmail.com (R.I. Dist : 3030, 3132, 3140) PDG Sudhir Gupta 17, Civil Lines, Near Allahabad Bank Moradabad - 244 001, (U.P.) Tel (O) : 0591 2412072 Tel (R) : 0591 2423295 Mobile : 9412241221 Fax : 0591 2415647 E-mail : sudhir_mbd@rediffmail.com (R.I. Dist : 3100) PDG .P. Sambasiva Rao Zen Securities Ltd. 6-3-1219/6/1, 201, NCR’s Subbamma Towers Uma Nagar, Begumpet, Hyderabad-500 016, Andhra Pradesh Tel (O) : 040-23412391/23547458 Mobile : 09849033150 E-mail : pdgsam3150@gmail.com (R.I. Dist : 3000, 3020, 3150)
  57. 57. INDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERSINDIA NATIONAL POLIOPLUS COMMITTEE MEMBERS Rtn. S. K. Jain 259, Sindh Society, Aundh Pune-411 007, Maharashtra Tel (O) : 020-25851111, 25851234 Tel (R) : 020-25851585 Fax : 020-25851000 Mobile : 09422014700 E-mail : synergyjain@bsnl.in, synergy.pune@vsnl.com (R.I. Dist : 3131 & Corporate Advocacy for Polio Programme Funding) Rtn. Ajay Saxena 5/169, Vikas Nagar Near Carrier Convent College, Sector-5 Lucknow 226022, Uttar Pradesh Tel (O) : 0522-2377349 Telefax : 0522-2769305 Mobile : 9415023778 E-mail : saxena.ajay06@gmail.com (R.I. Dist : 3120 & Social Mobilisation and Advocacy for U.P) PDG Vivek K. Tankha 37 Paschimi Marg (Ground Floor) Vasant Vihar, New Delhi-110 057, India Tel (R) : 011-4166-1662/2615-2424 Fax : 011-41057529 Mobile : 9811229933 E-mail : vivek.tankha@gmail.com (Advocacy) PDG Dr. Bharat S. Pandya Rama Niwas, Pandya Hospital Sodawala Ln, Borivli (W) Mumbai – 400092, India Tel (O) : 022-28904511 Tel (R) : 022-28900309 Fax : 022-289082843 Mobile : 9820320622 E-mail : drbspandya@gmail.com (Advocacy for Maharashtra)
  58. 58. DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS 2980 S P Balasubramaniam Shanakya Marketing, 293, Pachapatti, Salem-636015 (Tamil Nadu) Tel. (O) : 0427-2260534 Mobile : 9443257555 E-Mail : shanakyar@gmail.com 3000 Jagannathan Paramasivam 130, J Arsasu Nagar, P.C. Patti, Theni - 625531 (Tamilnadu) Tel (O) : 04546-265999 (R) : 04546-264666 Mobile : 09443100464 E-Mail : thenijagn@gmail.com 3010 Sanjay Khanna L-2A, Hauz Khas Enclave, New Delhi - 110016 Tel (O) : 011-26962981 (R) : 011-46243398 Mobile : 9810039102 E-Mail : skhanna3010@gmail.com 3020 DR. G V Mohan Prasad Dolphin Medical Services Limited, Ramachandrarao Road, Vijayawada-520002 (AP) Tel (O) : 0866-2575555 (R) : 0866-6519955 Mobile : 09849082522 E-Mail : drmohanprasad3020@gmail.com 3030 Dattatraya Shantaram Deshmukh Plot No. 178-A, Near Ganesh Mandir, Mahatma Nagar, Nashik - 422007 (Maharashtra) Tel (O) : 0253-2350554 (R) : 0253-2350565 Mobile : 09823150296 E-Mail : dsdeshmukh@yahoo.com 3040 Narendra Kumar Jain A-54, Alkapuri, Bhopal-462024 (Madhya Pradesh) Tel (O) : 0755-2744491 (R) : 0755-2488926 Mobile : 09827090710 E-Mail : narendrajaindg1415@yahoo.com
  59. 59. DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS 3051 Jagdish B Patel 1, Indrapuri Society, Near Gayatri Temple, Ambavadi, Visnagar-384315 (N.G.) Gujarat Tel (O) : 02765-232145 (R) : 02765-230373 (R) Mobile : 09825061321 E-mail : jagdish3051@yahoo.com 3052 Ramesh Agrawal 3-NA-1, Jawahar Nagar, Jaipur - 302004 (Rajasthan) Tel (O) : 0141-2636175 (R) : 0141-2650862 Mobile : 09829050862 E-mail : ragrawal20@yahoo.com 3053 Anil Maheshwari 1-A-13, Pawanpuri, Bikaner - 334003 (Rajasthan) Tel (O) : 0151-2524726 (R) : 0151-3204999 Mobile : 09414138833 E-mail : akm3053@gmail.com 3060 Ashish Ramesh Ajmera 17, “Ashish” Saraswati Colony Vidhyanagari, Deopur Dhule - 424005 (Maharashtra) Tel (O) : 02562-220512 (R) : 02562-270149 Mobile : 09423193000 E-mail : ashishajmera27@hotmail.com 3070 Gurjeet Singh Sekhon NIIT Amritsar, 2nd Floor, 38, The Mall, Amritsar - 143001 (Punjab) Tel (O) : 0183-5066100 (R) : 0183-2592401 Mobile : 09814055104 E-mail : gurjeetsekhon@hotmail.com 3080 Dilip Patnaik Director, George Edu. Institute, Nimbuwala, Garhi Cantt., Dehradun - 248003 (Uttarakhand) Tel (O) : 0135-2750750 (R) : 0135-2531556 Mobile : 09837051575 E-mail : georgeinst@rediffmail.com
  60. 60. DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS 3090 Pradeep Kumar Chehal Shop No. 102, New Grain Market, Rajpura Town, District Patiala-140401 (Punjab) Tel (O) : 01762-223505 (R) : 01762-222698 Mobile : 08968700071 E-mail : chehalpardeep@yahoo.co.in 3100 Sanjiv Rastogi 9, Shiv Sarover (Bank Colony), Garh Road, Meerut - 250004 (Uttar Pradesh) Mobile : 09412204174 E-mail : rtnsanjivrastogi@yahoo.com 3110 Ashok Jyoti 78/54, Latouch Road, Kanpur - 208001 (Uttar Pradesh) Tel (O) : 0512-2314478 (R) : 0512-2531955 Mobile : 09839034478 E-mail : ashokjyoti1950@gmail.com 3120 Satpal Gulati United Tower II, 53 Leader Road Allahabad - 211003, (Uttar Pradesh) Tel (O) : 0532-402953/54 Mobile : 9648700000 E-mail : satpalgulati3120@gmail.com 3131 Vivek Aranha 15, Dr. Ambedkar Road Rosary School Campus, Pune-411001 (Maharashtra) Tel (O) : 020-26134668 (R) : 020-26134668 Mobile : 09604100001 E-mail : vivekrosary@gmail.com 3132 Venkatesh Metan Flat No. B-3, Arihant Complex Bhawani Peth, Chatla Chowk, Solapur-413002 (Maharashtra) Tel (O) : 0217-2742150 (R) : 0217-2742151 Mobile : 09370080090 E-mail : metanv@yahoo.com
  61. 61. DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS 3140 Ajay Gupta 6, Firpos Building, 47-A Warden Road, Mumbai - 400026 (Maharashtra) Tel (O) : 022-28576628 (R) : 022-23517451 Mobile : 09820086576 E-mail : rtn.ajaygupta@gmail.com 3150 Malladi Vasudev “Haritha” No.11-4-63/A, Nehru Nagar, Khammam - 507002 (Andhra Pradesh) Tel (O) : 08742-228623 (R) : 08742-228623 Mobile : 09440160166 E-mail : rtnmalladivasudev@yahoo.com 3160 G S Mansoor 6-3-186, Ramnagar, Anantapur-515001 (Andhra Pradesh) Tel (O) : 08554-278303 (R) : 08554-278304 Mobile : 09849166999 E-mail : gajulashaik@hotmail.com 3170 Ganesh G Bhat Chaitanyashree, 8th Cross Kalyan Nagar, Dharwad - 580007 (Karnataka) Tel (O) : 0836-2446991 (R) : 0836-2741198 Mobile : 09886341198 E-mail : dwr_ganesh4639@rediffmail.com 3180 Dr. S Bhaskar Sreenivas, Darbe, Puttur - 574202 (Karnataka) Tel (O) : 08251-237784 (R) : 08251-230114 Mobile : 09448464514 E-mail : bshrinivas1959@gmail.com 3190 Manjunath Shetty No. 5AC-926, Kalyan Nagar, HRBR-I-Block, Bangalore-560043 (Karnataka) Tel (O) : 080-28524280 (R) : 080-25427687 Mobile : 09845035486 E-mail : manjunathshettym@gmail.com
  62. 62. DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS 3201 P Venugopalan Menon M/s. Bonanza Portfolio Ltd., St. Mary’s Bldg., Muvattupuzha - 686669 Ernakulam District, Kerala Tel (O) : 0485-2814440 (R) : 0485-2833391 Mobile : 09895760016 E-mail : venumenon4u@gmail.com 3202 K Sridharan Nambiar Classic Pipe Syndicate, Bullion Arcade, P.V. Sami Road, Chalapuram, Calicut-673002 (Kerala) Tel (O) : 0495-2700017 (R) : 0495-2358882 Mobile : 09847001185 E-mail : sridharannambiar@gmail.com 3211 K S Sasikumar Kaippallil House, Kadappakkada (P.O.), Kollam-691008 (Kerala) Tel (O) : 0474-2752848 (R) : 0474-2742848 Mobile : 09447012848 E-mail : sasi_kaippallil@rediffmail.com 3212 M. Ashok Padmaraj 872, Gandhiji Street, Punnai Nagar Nagercoil, Kanyakumar Distt.-629004 (Tamil Nadu) Tel (O) : 04652-237566 (R) : 04652-261061 Mobile : 09443102444 E-mail : mapashok@gmail.com 3230 I S A K Nazar AL-84, 1st Floor, 4th Street, 11th Main Road, Anna Nagar, Chennai-600040 (Tamil Nadu) Tel (O) : 044-26283991 (R) : 044-26203120 Mobile : 09444976846 E-mail : nazarisak@gmail.com 3240 Swapan Kumar Choudhury Subhadra Tower, “C”, S.B. Gorai Road, Opp. Sripalli Kalibari, Asansol-713304 (West Bengal) Tel (O) : 0341-2282692 (R) : 0341-2283638 Mobile : 09434037707 E-mail : swapan.k.choudhury@gmail.com
  63. 63. 3250 Sanjay Khemka Khemka Tower, 1 “Govind Nagar” Opp. Bekarbandh, Dhanbad-826001 (Jharkhand) Tel (O) : 0326-2291420 (R) : 09234378100 Mobile : 09431121176 E-mail : sanjay3250@gmail.com 3261 Shambhu Jagatramka Near Govt. Bus Stand, V.S.S. Marg, At. P.O. & District Sambalpur-768001 (Odisha) Tel (O) : 0663-2522791 (R) : Mobile : 09437258227 E-mail : shambhujagatramka3261@gmail.com 3262 Ashok Bihari Mohapatra “Amrutayan” Madhusudan Nagar Tulasipur, Cuttak - 753008 (Odisha) Tel (O) : 0671-2303703 (R) : Mobile : 09437208604 E-mail : abm3262@gmail.com 3291 Pinaki Prasad Ghosh Golf View Apartment, 315 Kamalalaya Centre, 156A, Lenin Sarani, Kolkata-700013 (West Bengal) Tel (O) : 033-22158112 (R) : 033-24732674 Mobile : 09433283675 E-mail : pinakidist3291@gmail.com DISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORSDISTRICT GOVERNORS
  64. 64. DISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMEN 2980 Dr. P. Manivannan Sri Sugam Hospital II Floor, 149 - E 2, Bazaar Street, Omalur Post & Taluq Salem District - 636455 Tel : 04290 - 220355 Tel : 04290 - 222953 Mobile : 09443221025 E-mail : ilanji2008@gmail.com 3000 PDG P.V. Parthasarathy ARASPVPV Equipment 58 - A, T.P.K Road Madurai - 625004, Tamil Nadu Tel (O) : 0452 – 2370671 / 72 Tel (R) : 0452 - 2642136 Mobile : 09894011709 / 09942982911 E-mail : parthasarathypvpv@yahoo.com 3010 PP Vipin Singhal The Voyage, Elite House, Office No. 201, Bldg. No. 36, Zamrudpur New Delhi - 110048 Tel (O) : 011- Tel (R) : 011- Mobile : 9811040450 E-mail : vipin@thevoyage.co.in 3020 Dr Damodar Reddy Patchipala Vijaya Hospitals, R.R. Pet Eluru - 534002 Andhra Pradesh Tel (O) : 08812-230500 Tel (R) : 08812-231244 Mobile : 094401-86917 E-mail : drdamodar3020@yahoo.com 3030 Rtn. PP Dr. K.S. Rajan Sanjeevani Hospital, V-2, Near Aath Rasta Square, Laxmi Nagar, Nagpur - 440022 (Maharastra) Tel (O) : 0712-2230393 Tel (R) : 0712-2225978 Mobile : 09822224550 E-mail : ksrajan51@gmail.com 3040 PDG Naresh Chand Jain M/s. Bhagwandas Shobhalal Jain Chameli Chowk, Sagar Madhya Pradesh - 470002 Tel (O) : 07582-406888 Tel (R) : 07582-406222 Mobile : 09425171666 E-mail : naresh_rtn2002@rediffmaill.com
  65. 65. DISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMENDISTRICT POLIOPLUS CHAIRMEN 3051 PDG Joitabhai Patel A-6, Saundarya Appartment, Nr, Arjun Tower, Ghatlodiya, Ahmedabad - 380061 Tel (O) : 079-27489432 Mobile : 09426015285 E-mail : joitabhai@yahoo.com 3052 Rtn. Balwant Singh Chirana Vidyabharti Public School Sikar(Raj) Mobile : 094140 37875 E-mail : bschirana@gmail.com 3053 Vijay Harsh Mangaram Colony, Gajner Road, Bikaner - 334001 (Rajasthan) Tel (O) : 0151-2527797 Mobile : 09214023173 E-mail : vijayharsh2014@gmail.com 3060 PDG Surendrasinh Parmar PO Sarigram via Bhilad Ta. Umbergaon, Distt.-Valsad - 396155 (Gujarat) Tel (O) : 0260-2784455 Mobile : 09824129910 E-mail : dr_parma@rediffmail.com 3070 PDG G. S. Bawa Bawa Polymers, F-22, Focal Point, Hoshiarpur, Punjab Tel (O) : 01882-249494 Tel (R) : 01882-220296 Mobile : 09814013304 E-mail : qsbawa58@gmail.com 3080 Rtn. V. S. Bhardwaj 15, Maharani Bagh, Phase-I, P.O. New Forest, Dehradun-248006 Tel (O) : 0135-2522200 Tel (R) : 0135-2767528 Mobile : 09897258637 E-mail : vsb.imabb@gmail.com

×