#5 Part 1: Presenting the Model Design Manual for Living Streets - Snyder, Moule

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#5 Part 1: Presenting the Model Design Manual for Living Streets - Snyder, Moule

  1. 1. What  Current  Manuals  Give  Us  
  2. 2. What  Street  Manuals  Could  Give  Us  
  3. 3. Who  Prepared  The  Manual  
  4. 4. Organiza;ons  •  AARP  Public  Policy  Ins/tute   •  Green  Los  Angeles  Coali/on  •  American  Society  of  Landscape   •  Ins/tute  of  Transporta/on  Engineers   Architects   •  Local  Government  Commission  •  Associa/on  of  Pedestrian  and  Bicycle   •  Los  Angeles  Chapter  of  the  American   Professionals   Ins/tute  of  Architects  •  California  Department  of  Health   •  Los  Angeles  County  Department  of   Services   Public  Health  •  California  Strategic  Growth  Council   •  Na/onal  Complete  Streets  Coali/on  •  City  of  Long  Beach   •  Project  for  Public  Spaces  •  City  of  Los  Angeles  Planning   •  Safe  Routes  to  School  Na/onal   Department   Partnership  •  Council  for  Watershed  Health   •  Smart  Growth  America  •  Congress  for  the  New  Urbanism   •  UCLA  Luskin  Center  for  Innova/on  •  Federal  Highway  Administra/on   •  Walkable  and  Livable  Communi/es   Ins/tute  
  5. 5. Legal  Standing  of  Street  Manuals  •  AASHTO  “Green  Book”  •  The  California  Highway   Design  Manual  •  Local  manuals  or  street   design  standards  •  MUTCD    •  The  California  Fire  Code  •  CA  Streets  and  Highways   Code  and  California  Vehicle   Code  
  6. 6. Living  Streets  Vision  •  Equity     •  Are  invi/ng  •  For  people  of  all  ages  and   •  Foster  healthy  commerce   physical  abili/es  whether   •  Strengthen  and  enhance   they  walk,  bicycle,  ride   neighborhoods   transit,  or  drive   •  Encourage  ac/ve  and  •  Integrate  connec/vity  and   healthy  lifestyles   traffic  calming  with   pedestrian-­‐oriented  site  and   •  Integrate  environmental   building  design   stewardship  •  Connect  people   •  Vary  in  character  by   neighborhood,  density,  and  •  Local  people  design  their   func/on   streets    
  7. 7. Street  Networks  and  Classifica;on  
  8. 8. Networks  
  9. 9. Block  Size  
  10. 10. Street  Typologies  
  11. 11. Boulevard  
  12. 12. Avenue  
  13. 13. Street  
  14. 14. Alley  
  15. 15. Transit  Mall  
  16. 16. Shared  Space  
  17. 17. Traveled  Way  Design  
  18. 18.  Design       Principles  •  Accommodate  all   users  •  Design  for   appropriate  speed   in  context  •  Safety  
  19. 19. Access  Management  
  20. 20. Cross  Sec;onal  Elements  •  On-­‐street  parking  •  Bicycle  facili/es  •  Transit  facili/es  •  Travel  lanes  •  Medians  •  Turn  lanes  
  21. 21. Intersec;on  Design  
  22. 22. Principles  of  Good  Intersec;on  Design  •  Compact  •  Avoid  conflicts  •  Simple  right-­‐angle   intersec/ons  are  best  •  Avoid  free-­‐flowing   movements  •  Apply  access   management  principles  •  Signal  /ming  considers   all  users  
  23. 23. Universal  Access  
  24. 24. Sidewalk  Zones  Single-­‐Family  Residen;al    
  25. 25. Pedestrian  Crossings  
  26. 26. Principles  of  Pedestrian  Crossings  •  Safe  crossing  is  a  must   •  Don’t  compromise  safety  •  Consider  all  users   to  accommodate  traffic   flow  •  Meet  accessibility   standards  and  guidelines.   •  Design  begins  with   appropriate  speed.  In  •  Crossings  must  be   general,  urban  arterials   “comfortable”   should  be  designed  to  a  •  Use  treatments  with   maximum  of  30  mph  or   highest  crash  reduc/on   35  mph   factors     •  Every  crossing  needs   tailored  design    
  27. 27. Design  Considera;ons  •  Ideally,  uncontrolled  crossing   •  Double  (or  triple)  le`  or  right   distances  should  be  no  more  than   turns  concurrent  (permissive)   21  feet.  Streets  wider  than  40   with  pedestrian  crossings  at   feet  should  be  divided  by   signalized  intersec/ons  must   installing  a  median  or  two   never  be  allowed.     crossing  islands.     •  Avoid  concurrent  movements  of  •  Maximum  of  three  lanes  per   motor  vehicles  and  people  at   direc/on  on  all  roads  (plus  a   signalized  intersec/ons.   median  or  center  turn  lane).   •  People  should  never  have  to  wait  •  There  must  be  a  safe,  convenient   more  than  90  seconds  to  cross  at   crossing  at  every  transit  stop.   signalized  intersec/ons.   •  Pedestrian  signals  should  be   provided  at  all  signalized   crossings  where  pedestrians  are   allowed.    
  28. 28. Pedestrian  Toolbox  •  Guidance  on  using  each   •  A  few  samples  
  29. 29. Crossing  Islands  
  30. 30. Advanced  Yield   Line  
  31. 31. Scramble  Intersec;on  
  32. 32. Raised  Crosswalk  
  33. 33. Rectangular  Rapid   Flash  Beacons  
  34. 34. Chapter  8:  Bikeway  Design  
  35. 35. Shared  Use  Path  
  36. 36. Bike  Lane  
  37. 37. Bike  Route  
  38. 38. Bike  Boulevards  
  39. 39. Bike  Boulevards  
  40. 40. Buffered  Bike  Lane  
  41. 41. Cycle  Tracks  
  42. 42. Bike  Box  
  43. 43. Transit  Accommoda;on  
  44. 44. Traffic  Calming  
  45. 45. Framework/Non-­‐Framework  Streets     Use  Cross-­‐Sec;onal  Measures  •  Reduc/on  in  #  of  lanes  •  Reduc/on  in  lane  width  •  Medians,  islands  •  On-­‐street  parking  •  Street  trees  •  Bike  lanes  •  Colored  or  textured   pavement  •  Shared  space  •  Pedestrian-­‐scale  ligh/ng  •  Curbless  medians  and   streets  
  46. 46. Non-­‐Framework  (&  Framework  at  low  ADT)  Streets     Use  Periodic  Measures  Horizontal  Measures   Ver/cal  Measures   Narrowings  •  Roundabouts     •  Raised  crosswalks   •  Yield  streets  •  Mini-­‐roundabouts   and  intersec/ons   •  Bulb-­‐outs   and  mini-­‐circles   •  Speed  cushions   •  Pinch  points  •  Chicanes   •  Speed  tables  •  Impellers   •  Speed  humps  •  Short  medians  
  47. 47. Streetscape   Ecosystem  
  48. 48. Goals  of     Streetwater  Management  •  Reduce  runoff  •  Slow  flow  •  Spread  flow  •  Sink  •  Store  •  Use  
  49. 49. Street  Trees  
  50. 50. Street  Furniture   •  Benches  and  sea/ng   •  Bollards   •  Street  vendor  stands   •  Informa/onal  kiosks   •  News  racks   •  Parking  meters   •  Signs   •  Refuse  receptacles   •  Public  art   •  Sidewalk  dining   •  Clocks,  fountains,  etc.  
  51. 51. Re-­‐Placing  Streets  
  52. 52. Designing  Land  Use    Along  Living  Streets  
  53. 53. Design  Principles  •  Compact,  connected,  complete,  con/nuous  •  Organize  places  at  a  human  scale  •  Safety,  convenience,  comfort  for  all  users  •  Create  places  for  people  to  interact;  plazas,  parks,  squares  •  Well  connected  street  network  of  small  blocks  •  Locate  land  uses  within  walking  distance  of  one  another  •  Buildings  should  face  the  street,  have  windows  looking  onto   the  street  and  open  to  the  sidewalk  •  On-­‐street  parking  provides  a  buffer  •  Setbacks  should  enhance  pedestrian  experience  •  Off-­‐street  parking  should  not  disrupt  pedestrian  experience  •  Shared  off-­‐street  parking  reduces  non-­‐produc/ve  land  use  
  54. 54. RetrofiZng  Suburbia  
  55. 55. Cul-­‐de-­‐Sac  Connector  
  56. 56. Remade  Exis/ng   Neighborhood  
  57. 57. Community  Engagement  
  58. 58. Adop;on   •  Download   www.modelstreetdesignmanual.com   for$ •  Manual  as  a  template   •  Customize   •  Formalize  adop/on  Los$Angeles$County 2011 YOUR  CITY’S  NAME   Date  
  59. 59. Ryan  Snyder  Ryan  Snyder  Associates   ryan@rsa.cc   310-­‐475-­‐3895   Michael  Moule   Nelson  Nygaard   mmoule@nelsonnygaard.com   415-­‐281-­‐6920  

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