Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Just Culture - PSOW 2015

3,576 views

Published on

Just Culture - PSOW 2015

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Just Culture - PSOW 2015

  1. 1. To Err Is Human Patient Safety Your Safety Our Safety
  2. 2. Culture of Safety • 80% of medical errors are system‐derived • Good people simply working harder will not  be sufficient to overcome the high complexity  inherent in EMS.  • Errors will occur • The key is to design systems so that harm does  not reach the patient. 
  3. 3. Reason’s "Swiss Cheese" Model Reason, James. Human error: models and management. British Medical Journal 2000; 320:768‐770.
  4. 4. Culture of Safety • The benefit of this approach to managing  behavior is that the process is up‐front and  transparent to the staff, which helps to achieve  trust.  • Risks become identified, reckless behavior isn’t  tolerated, and ultimately the organization is safer.  • In practical terms, today you are 3x more likely to  be involved in a MVC and 1,000x more likely to be  involved in a medical error than in an aviation‐ related incident, due in part to this cultural shift. 
  5. 5. An Introduction to Just Culture The single greatest impediment to error prevention in the medical industry is “that we punish people for making mistakes” Dr. Lucian Leape Professor, Harvard School of Public Health Testimony before Congress on Health Care Quality Improvement
  6. 6. Safe Culture • The first and possibly most important step in promoting a safe  culture is the establishment of justice. – Just Culture   – A system of shared accountability – The organization is responsible for safe system and process design – And employees are responsible for safe choices and behaviors • This shifts an organization away from a “blame” culture.  • Why?  • Because to design safety, the organization needs feedback from  users (employees).  • To give feedback, employees need trust.  • An organization can establish this trust through a consistent and fair  approach to managing employee behaviors. 
  7. 7. Establishment of a Just Culture
  8. 8. Establishment of a Just Culture • Outcome Engineering of Plato, Texas defines these three  behaviors as follows: • Human Error:  – An inadvertent action; inadvertently doing other that what  should have been done; slip, lapse, mistake.  – Product of current system design and behavioral choices • At‐Risk Behavior:  – A behavioral choice that increases risk where risk is not  recognized, or is mistakenly believed to be justified.  – A choice, risk believed insignificant or justified • Reckless Behavior:  – A behavioral choice to consciously disregard a substantial and  unjustifiable risk. 
  9. 9. Establishment of a Just Culture • Human Error:  – An inadvertent action; inadvertently doing other that  what should have been done; slip, lapse, mistake.  – Product of current system design and behavioral  choices • Manage through changes in: – Processes & Procedures – Design – Training  • Console
  10. 10. Establishment of a Just Culture • At‐Risk Behavior:  – A behavioral choice that increases risk where risk is  not recognized, or is mistakenly believed to be  justified.  – A choice, risk believed insignificant or justified  • Manage through: – Removing incentives for at‐risk behaviors – Creating incentives for healthy behaviors – Increasing situational awareness • Coach
  11. 11. Requires A Change in Culture “Treat every drug administration as if it’s  wrong and will kill the patient” John Nance • Suggested Meds: – Narcotics, to include Ketamine  – Epi 1:1,000  vs Epi 1:10,000 – Mag Sulfate – Any Pediatric Dose – Rarely used medications [Diltiazem] – All CCP medications
  12. 12. Establishment of a Just Culture • Reckless Behavior:  – A behavioral choice to consciously disregard a  substantial and unjustifiable risk • Manage through: – Remedial action – Punitive action • Discipline
  13. 13. Accountability for Our Behaviors Human Error At‐Risk Behavior Reckless Behavior Inadvertent action:  slip, lapse, mistake A choice: risk not  recognized or  believed justified Conscious disregard of  unreasonable risk Manage through  changes in: • Processes • Procedures • Training • Design • Environment Manage through: • Remove incentives  for at‐risk  behaviors • Create incentives  for healthy  behaviors • Increase situational  awareness Manage through: • Remedial action • Punitive action Console Coach Discipline/Sanction
  14. 14. What do you see?
  15. 15. Just Culture – Not Blame Also not carefree  • A just culture recognizes that individual practitioners  should not be held accountable for system failings over  which they have no control. • A just culture also recognizes many errors represent  predictable interactions between human operators and  the systems in which they work; and recognizes that  competent professionals make mistakes. • Also acknowledges that even competent professionals  will develop unhealthy norms (shortcuts, “routine rule  violations”). • A just culture has zero tolerance for reckless behavior.
  16. 16. Wrong Medication Dose Human Error At‐Risk Behavior Reckless Behavior Inadvertent action:  slip, lapse, mistake A choice: risk not  recognized or  believed justified Conscious disregard of  unreasonable risk “I drew up 4mg and  gave it IV, then  immediately realized  that it should have  been 0.4 mg”  “I would have double‐ checked with my  partner, but she was  out getting supplies,  and I wanted to get  the patient treated”  “I have everything  memorized and don’t  rely on cheat sheets  and can’t trust  another medic” Console Coach Discipline/Sanction
  17. 17. Wrong Medication Dose Human Error At‐Risk Behavior Reckless Behavior Inadvertent action:  slip, lapse, mistake A choice: risk not  recognized or  believed justified Conscious disregard of  unreasonable risk “I drew up 4mg and  gave it IV, then  immediately realized  that it should have  been 0.4 mg”  “I would have double‐ checked with my  partner, but she was  out getting supplies,  and I wanted to get  the patient treated”  “I have everything  memorized and don’t  rely on cheat sheets  and can’t trust  another medic” Console Coach Discipline/Sanction
  18. 18. Wrong Medication Dose Human Error At‐Risk Behavior Reckless Behavior Inadvertent action:  slip, lapse, mistake A choice: risk not  recognized or  believed justified Conscious disregard of  unreasonable risk “I drew up 4mg and  gave it IV, then  immediately realized  that it should have  been 0.4 mg”  “I would have double‐ checked with my  partner, but she was  out getting supplies,  and I wanted to get  the patient treated”  “I have everything  memorized and don’t  rely on cheat sheets  and can’t trust  another medic” Console Coach Discipline/Sanction
  19. 19. RSI: Paralysis Without Sedation Human Error At‐Risk Behavior Reckless Behavior Inadvertent action:  slip, lapse, mistake A choice: risk not  recognized or  believed justified Conscious disregard of  unreasonable risk “3 am call, very busy  night, I was tired” “Patient had a head  injury and was  unconscious so didn’t  need sedation” “Patient is demented  and won’t remember  anyway” or “I’ve  never had a patient  complain” Console Coach Discipline/Sanction
  20. 20. RSI: Paralysis Without Sedation Human Error At‐Risk Behavior Reckless Behavior Inadvertent action:  slip, lapse, mistake A choice: risk not  recognized or  believed justified Conscious disregard of  unreasonable risk “3 am call, very busy  night, I was tired” “Patient had a head  injury and was  unconscious so didn’t  need sedation” “Patient is demented  and won’t remember  anyway” or “I’ve  never had a patient  complain” Console Coach Discipline/Sanction
  21. 21. RSI: Paralysis Without Sedation Human Error At‐Risk Behavior Reckless Behavior Inadvertent action:  slip, lapse, mistake A choice: risk not  recognized or  believed justified Conscious disregard of  unreasonable risk “3 am call, very busy  night, I was tired” “Patient had a head  injury and was  unconscious so didn’t  need sedation” “Patient is demented  and won’t remember  anyway” or “I’ve  never had a patient  complain” Console Coach Discipline/Sanction
  22. 22. Accountability for Our Behaviors Human Error At‐Risk Behavior Reckless Behavior Inadvertent action:  slip, lapse, mistake A choice: risk not  recognized or  believed justified Conscious disregard of  unreasonable risk Manage through  changes in: • Processes • Procedures • Training • Design • Environment Manage through: • Remove incentives  for at‐risk  behaviors • Create incentives  for healthy  behaviors • Increase situational  awareness Manage through: • Remedial action • Punitive action Console Coach Discipline/Sanction
  23. 23. Assume Good Intent Just Culture – Not Blame.  Also not carefree.  A just culture has zero tolerance for reckless behavior.

×