Idea Generation

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In this Slideshare presentation:
1. Coraggio 2. Intro 3. Idea generation techniques 4. Techniques and examples 5. Further examples 6. Without words 7. Metaphor and analogy 8. Juxtaposition 8. Exaggeration 9. Do the opposite 10. Omissions and suggestions 11. Playing with time 12. Endorsement 13. Change in perspective 14. Dramatic style 15. Take it literally 16. Physical attributes 17. What's the feeling 18. Self - depreciation 19. Slice of life 20. Competitive sets 21. What if 22. How the products really made 23. Mouse trap 24. Dramatise the benefit 25. Double the meanings 26. Play with words 27. Focusing on a key word 28. End 29. Credits

Idea Generation

  1. 1. Coraggio’23 techniques for generating better creative ideas’Friday, 14 October 2011
  2. 2. Idea Generation Techniques
  3. 3. Area Questions & Techniques ExamplesWithout words The image is constructed in a way that says more about the product than is actually seen. ! Parmalat ! Burger king Are there any scenes or situations in which the product benefit could be conveyed without words? ! BicMetaphor and Create mental images that express a ‘thing’ in terms of another ‘thing’. ! Volvoanalogy What metaphors or analogies can be found that will represent the brand or benefit at a glance? ! VW beetleJuxtaposition A comparison can generate a response that dramatises the product. ! Caesar dog food What kind of juxtaposition could be used to create a surprising, provocative or humorous meaning? ! Safety CentreExaggeration Exaggeration can grab a viewers attention and emphasise the benefit. ! VW bus What exaggeration could represent the brand more forcefully? ! Heinz tomato ketchupDo the opposite Doing the opposite of what people expect creates interest and humour. ! Whiskas How can the benefits be shown by inverting something familiar?Omissions and Let the viewer finish off the missing link. ! Toyota Land Cruisersuggestions How can the benefits be represented by suggestion? ! Adidas ! Japan SushiPlaying with Make the effect of time visible. ! Sims Snowboardstime What effect does time have on the product or the user?Endorsement Connect with the target market by using a familiar face to promote the benefit. ! Poison the sea Who is a good spokesperson for your product? ! Vegetarian society ! ING - Billy ConnollyChange in A change of perspective can be as simple as using an unusual viewpoint. ! Toasterperspective ! IRN-BRU How can the product be shown from the eyes of an object or creature? ! SmirnoffDramatic style A dramatic style is a way to bring an everyday situation to life. ! Carton Draught - ‘Big Ad’ What everyday situations could best show the benefits of the product? ! NikeTake it literally Try taking everything literally. You will soon notice that word-for-word translations into a direct picture often lead to ! The Famous Grouse comical representations. ! Nokia 6110 - “A phone that tells you where to go” What images do you get if you take descriptions of the product benefit literally?
  4. 4. Area Questions & Techniques ExamplesPhysical Altering the product can produce countless possibilities that can give the product meaning and enhance the benefit. ! Guinnessattributes ! Margarine How could changing the shape of the product enhance its benefits? ! DurexWhatʼs the Think like the product user. What feeling does it give them when they use it? ! Sonyfeeling? What can be associated with the product to emphasis its special features? ! BMWSelf-deprecation Put yourself in the negative to draw attention and create unexpected results. ! VW - ‘think small’ ! Toyota Can you provoke the target audience in a way that draws attention to the product message?Slice of life A slice of life is a direct way to connect with the target market. ! Adidas How could dramatic style be incorporated to enhance the situation? ! Visual colourCompetitive sets Used to show how the product’s features and benefits compare to the competitor’s product. ! Apple Mac What are the strengths of the product over the competitors?What if It’s a conceptual shift that can lead to great discoveries and put a new perspective on the problem. ! Pepsi - ice cubes What’s the good side of losing your wallet?How is the Exaggerate the process in which the product is created and delivered to the consumer. ! Tuna in a canproduct really What is the simplest way of describing the process of manufacturing your product? ! John Westmade? ! Toohey’s Extra Dry(hyperbole)Mouse trap Grab your target market’s attention by getting them involved in a game. ! Dog Home How can you use the advertising medium to create an interactive toy? ! Vapona - fly killerDramatise the What is the most surreal or absurd idea that will put the benefit at centre-stage? ! Rexonabenefit ! Skittles What bizarre ideas can the product be associated with?Double- What opportunities for ambiguity or double-meaning are there in the words you are using to describe the product? ! All Bran - trouble passing?meanings Describe the product without naming it, in such a way that it produces double-meaning. ! Gold’s GymPlay with words Experiment with type so that copy turns into pictures and the typography becomes the message. ! M&Ms ! Nandos - Spice Grills How can words, symbols or logos be integrated into a picture without using the usual typography treatment?Focusing on a A keyword tells a story that the viewer finishes off. ! VW - Married and Divorcedkeyword ! Mercedes - Soon Is the central statement addressed by the keyword?
  5. 5. Without words Stories can be told in an effective way without using words. The image is constructed in a way that says more about the product than is actually seen. They invite the viewer to ‘finish off’ the meaning of the image. - How can the benefit be shown in one picture?
  6. 6. Metaphor and analogyTo understand the benefit of something new it is best to use something we already know. Comparisons createmental images that express a ‘thing’ in terms of another ‘thing’. For example, a Volvo as safe as a safety pin. - What metaphors or analogies can be found that will represent the brand or benefit at a glance? - What can the product be compared to? - What looks like it, or works in a similar manner? - What visual images do these metaphors suggest? - What parallels can be drawn?
  7. 7. JuxtapositionComparative juxtapositions such as ‘before and after’ can be used to great effect. Sometimes the comparisonsmay not be so obvious but can generate a response that dramatises the product. - What before and after comparisons could underline the product benefit? - What can the product be compared with? - What kind of juxtaposition could be used to create a surprising, provocative or humorous meaning?
  8. 8. ExaggerationExaggerating features of the product can grab a viewer’s attention and emphasise the benefit. - What exaggeration could represent the brand more forcefully? - What can be added? - Can it be made bigger, longer or thicker? - Increase in numbers? - What reductions could also represent the brand more forcefully?
  9. 9. Do the opposite Doing the opposite of what people expect creates interest and humour. - How can the benefits be shown by inverting something familiar? - Convert the benefit into a disadvantage? - What about reversing the roles? - Turn it upside down? - Turn the familiar into the unfamiliar?
  10. 10. Omissions and suggestionsPauses give music life, and covering up can be more erotic than being naked. Sometimes the best way toemphasise something is to let the viewer finish off the missing link. - What could replace the product? - What could be removed? - How can the benefits be represented by suggestion?
  11. 11. Playing with timeMaking the effect of time visible can show just how important your product has been, or could be,over history. - What effect does time have on the product or the user? - Where does the product take the user now? - How does the viewer now look at the past?
  12. 12. EndorsementConnect with the target market by using a familiar face or object to promote the benefit of your product. - Who’s for it? - Who’s against it? - Who from history really needed it? - What familiar people, objects, locations could you utilise to grab attention in a provocative way?
  13. 13. Change inperspectiveA change of perspective can be as simple as using an unusual viewpoint: bird’s-eye view, close-up. Anotherway can be to give human characteristics to objects and animals. - How can the product be shown from the eyes of an object or creature? - How can a change in viewpoint add meaning to the product and its benefits? - How can the product reveal new perspectives to the target market?
  14. 14. Dramatic styleA dramatic style is a way to bring an everyday situation to life. Think of ways to give the product and thesituation an exciting twist. Show a new angle, invent comical situations. - How would the story change if the dramatic style was to change from horror to action or comedy? - What genres are creatively rich?
  15. 15. Take it literallyTry taking everything literally. You will soon notice that word-for-word translations into a direct picture oftenlead to comical representations. - What images do you get if you take descriptions of the product benefit literally? - What ideas or statements can be taken literally to create funny, satirical or witty images? - What slang phrases, nicknames or metaphors can conjure up useful images?
  16. 16. Physical attributesAltering the product means changing its shape, cutting it into pieces, blowing it up, squeezing it, squashing itand so on. There are countless possibilities that can all give the product meaning and enhance the benefit. - How could changing the shape of the product enhance its benefits? - What would happen if you changed the location of the product? - What would happen if you altered the way it looks, moves, smells or sounds?
  17. 17. What’s the feeling?Think like the product user and try to understand the feeling it could give them when they use it. - How can the feeling be portrayed in an image? - What associations can communicate the feeling on a metaphorical level?
  18. 18. Self - deprecationSometimes the best reaction can be found by putting yourself in the negative. More often than not it will drawattention and create unexpected results. - What would no one dare to say about the product? - Can you provoke the target audience to draw attention to the product message? - What has no one else ever associated with this product?
  19. 19. Slice of lifeA slice of life is a direct way to connect with the target market, and shows that the company clearly know whothey are dealing with. - How can the product be shown subtly to evoke a response? - What sort of story can put an importance on the product? - How could dramatic style be incorporated to enhance the situation?
  20. 20. Competitive setsCompetitive sets can be successfully used to show how the product’s features and benefits compare to thecompetitor’s product. - What are the strengths of the product over the competitors? - How can you show superiority? - Can a dramatic style or change in perspective help to enhance the comparison?
  21. 21. What ifThink ‘What if...’. It’s a conceptual shift that can lead to great discoveries and put a new perspective on theproblem. Put yourself in someone elses shoes. - What if grass was pink? - What if dogs could talk? - What if losing your wallet was a good thing?
  22. 22. How the products really made (hyperbole) Exaggerate the process in which the product is created and delivered to the consumer. - What is the simplest way of describing the process of manufacturing your product? - What aspects of the manufacturing process can you dramatise?
  23. 23. Mouse trapGrab your target market’s attention by getting them involved in a game. Remind them of games they playedwhen they were kids. Challenge them, amuse them, get their mind working. - What kind of games can you use to engage your target audience? - How can you use the advertising medium to create an interactive toy? - What sort of witty instructions could you use to get the target group to play?
  24. 24. Dramatise the benefitContradiction, exaggeration, distortion and fantasising are the tools to dramatise the benefit. - What is the most surreal or absurd idea that will put the benefit at centre-stage? - What is the best way to represent the benefit within a surreal situation? - What bizarre ideas can the product be associated with?
  25. 25. Double meaningsVerbal ambiguity makes the point of witty wordplay and suggestion, leading the viewer to analternative meaning. - What opportunities for ambiguity or double-meaning are there in the words you are using to describe the product? “Laugh and the world laughs with you, pun and you pun alone”
  26. 26. Play with wordsPlaying with words is about experimenting with type so that copy turns into pictures and the typographybecomes the message. - How can you play with typography to represent the product in an effective visual way? - How can words, symbols or logos be integrated into a picture without using the usual typography treatment?
  27. 27. Focusing on a keywordFocusing on a keyword puts the whole emphasis of the ad onto a few letters of type. When describing thebenefit, which word is the master of all keywords? - Is the central statement addressed by the keyword? - Is the keyword ambiguous enough to allow the viewer to be engaged?
  28. 28. StepChangeMarketing.com Join us on Linkedin - just google Jeffrey Cooper or Ashton Bishop Check out our YouTube channel “Step Change Marketing”© Copyright 2011 All rights r eser ved by St ep Change Marketing in perpetuit y

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