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Give A Great Tech Talk 2013

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Updated version of my tutorial on how to give a great tech talk, this time without Ian Dees. New tutorial is longer thanks to longer talk slot. Mostly the extra time will be spent on exercises.

Published in: Self Improvement, Technology
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Give A Great Tech Talk 2013

  1. 1. Give a Great Tech TalkJosh BerkusPostgreSQL ExpertsLinux Collab 2013San Franciscowith contributions from Ian Dees
  2. 2. for anyone who:plans to speak,wants to speak,has spoken,or is thinking of speaking ...
  3. 3. … at an open sourceconference,user group meeting,company meeting,or technical training ...
  4. 4. … and wants to get from
  5. 5. … to:
  6. 6. ScheduleTime (approx) Part2pm to 3:15pm Part I: 80% Preparation3:15pm to 4pm Part II: 20% Execution4pm to 4:30pm Break4:30pm to 5pmPart III: The Audience OutsideThe Lecture HallAdditional Q&A
  7. 7. Part I: 80% Preparation● Topicalilty● Know your timeslot● Know your audience● Nobody cares about your slides● … but make good ones anyway● Rehearse, rehearse, rehearse● Day Of prep
  8. 8. Part II: 20% Execution● The 7 Habits of Highly IneffectivePresenters● the 7 Habits, deconstructed● Audience Interaction 101● What to do when your demo fails
  9. 9. III: The Audience Outsidethe Lecture Hall● Hallway track● Sharing slides● Video● Curating your talks
  10. 10. Q&A● Question periods during tutorial– Ill let you know when● Write down your questions– or Tweet them: #ggtt
  11. 11. Exercises
  12. 12. Part I: 80% Preparation
  13. 13. TopicalityAlways present things ...● you know a lot about● are currently topical● youre enthusiastic about● you can cover in the timeallotted
  14. 14. TopicalityAsk yourself ...● what do you expect theaudience to learn?● what do you expect theaudience to do after the talk?
  15. 15. $topic is {cool|easy|hard|fun}How to $taskby using $technique{contribute to|adopt|dump}$project
  16. 16. How to give a better talkby using good preparationand delivery techniques.
  17. 17. Speaker Exercise #1Topicality
  18. 18. dont present thingsfor other people
  19. 19. dont presentincomplete projects… unless youre at the conference to get help.
  20. 20. Know Your Timeslot
  21. 21. Basic Timeslots● 5 Minutes Lightning Talk– one small topic very briefly● 30-45 Minutes Regular talk, no Q&A● 1 Hour Regular talk with Q&A– one major topic with some depth● 2-3 Hours Tutorial– entire tool or technology
  22. 22. Basic Timeslots● 5 Minutes Lightning Talk– “5 kernel settings you didnt know”● 30-45 Minutes Regular talk, no Q&A● 1 Hour Regular Talk with Q&A– “Kernel settings for performance tuning”● 2-3 Hours Tutorial– “Linux 3.5 Kernel Settings: a 3-Hour Tour”
  23. 23. Know Your Audience
  24. 24. Who Are They?● Professions?● Ages?● Culture?● From where?● Groups?
  25. 25. What do they want?● Why are they at the conference?● What is their interest in your topic?● How much do they know already?● What style/format do they expect?● Do they have things in common youcan refer to?
  26. 26. OpenSourceBridge“Analyze query plans to find the “gofaster” button”
  27. 27. pgCon“Find chronic performance issues inyour discarded query plans”
  28. 28. SIGCSE“Discarded plan analysis as a methodfor teaching query optimization”
  29. 29. Speaker Exercise #2:Audience
  30. 30. 7 Steps for Talk Preparation1. Create some notes2. Come up with a story3. Work out a script & timings4. Create slides5. Rehease6. Revise7. Rehearse again
  31. 31. 6 Basic Stories for Talks1. Enlightenment2. Solution Quest3. A to Z4. Show & Tell5. Theme & Variations6. The Catalog
  32. 32. Enlightenmenta journey from ignorance toknowledge:How I Learnedto Stop Worryingand Love SELinux
  33. 33. Solution Questshows a problem and attemptedsolutions (maybe includingsuccess)Building a robot anti-squirrelsentry gun
  34. 34. A to Zcovers something from “end toend” or “bottom to top”Tracing the performanceproblem in your web stack
  35. 35. Show & TellDemo something. Then explainhow it worked.Postgres replicationin 10 minutes
  36. 36. Theme & VariationsShow several different ways toaccomplish the same taskGenerators: learn to loopthe Pythonic way
  37. 37. The CatalogA list of items, with details ofeach.This section
  38. 38. Stories & Timeslots● 5 Minutes Lightning Talk– One story● 30-45 Minutes Regular talk, no Q&A● 1 Hour Regular talk with Q&A– 1 or 2 stories● 2-3 Hours Tutorial– 2 to 4 stories, some repeated
  39. 39. Section StoryAudience Theme and VariationsTalk Preparation A to ZTimeslot Theme and VariationsStories CatalogMaking Slides A to Z7 Habits Theme & Variations
  40. 40. Speaker Exercise #3:Story
  41. 41. Nobody Cares About YourSlides
  42. 42. Speaker Exercise #4No Slides
  43. 43. … but make good ones anyway
  44. 44. Tools: the Big Three“Create your slides in some standardslide software like Keynote,OpenOffice Impress or PowerPoint.”- Andy Lester
  45. 45. But If Youre Ready to Move On
  46. 46. Web-based slidemakers● Ruby apps– Showoff– Slidedown● HTML5 Apps– Landslide– html5slides– DZSlides
  47. 47. advantages● curate your slides in a VCS● embed actual code– Showoff: embedded terminal● no “office app” mess● run slides on web host
  48. 48. disadvantages● hard to learn– CSS for design● cant do fancy design– no graphics stuff either● no upload to Slideshare● run slides from a web host
  49. 49. Conference ThemesJosh Berkus, PostgreSQLTS-5502
  50. 50. Employer themes, or:. .www pgexperts com- - -1 888 PG XPERT,San Francisco CA.PostgreSQL Experts Inc ,April 16 2013 Page 45“Sometimes you.”just need an expert
  51. 51. … you dont haveto sell your soul. .www pgexperts com
  52. 52. “ cute” accessory themes
  53. 53. Josh BerkusSCALE 2013
  54. 54. Good accessory theme:● related to the main topic● provides structure● makes the talk more “fun”
  55. 55. bad accessory theme● irrelevant to the main topic● visually distracting● offensive
  56. 56. a word on sensitivity● dont offend your audience● your audience includes people whoare different from you– think how youll come across● if you offend them accidentally,apologize
  57. 57. Dont be a jerk
  58. 58. Light on DarkDark on Light
  59. 59. dark roomsvideoterminal demosbright roomsclipartcode snippets
  60. 60. Heraldry
  61. 61. Metal vs. Color● Metals– Yellow– White● Colors– Black– Blue– Red– Green– Purple– Brown
  62. 62. Point Size Is Your Barometer
  63. 63. Title Font● Text FontCode Font● 3 Fonts is OK. Two is better.
  64. 64. Maybe I ShouldHave Used ArialInstead
  65. 65. Master Slides
  66. 66. Code Examples
  67. 67. def snippetize(self):with ZipFile(all.key) as original:with ZipFile(out.key, w) as updated:for item in original.filelist:if item.filename != index.apxl:contents = original.read(item.filename)updated.writestr(item, contents)raw = original.read(index.apxl)# Find snippets in the source treedoc = minidom.parseString(raw)pattern = //sf:shape[starts-with(@sf:href,http://localhost/)]strip = http://localhost/finder = Finder(doc, pattern, strip)bad code
  68. 68. # Find snippets in the source treedoc = minidom.parseString(raw)pattern = "//sf:shape[starts-with(" "@sf:href,http://localhost/)]"strip = "http://localhost/"finder = Finder(doc, pattern, strip)good code
  69. 69. create table reports.connections_by_minute asselect cast(minstart as time) as minstart,start_count + sum( conn_count - disc_count )OVER ( order by minstart ) as connsfrom (select minstart,coalesce(conn_count,0) as conn_count,coalesce(disc_count,0) as disc_countfrom log_minutesleft outer join( select date_trunc(minute, log_time) as contime,count(*) as conn_countfrom connectionsgroup by 1 ) as connson minstart = conns.contimeleft outer join( select date_trunc(minute, log_time) as contime,count(*) as disc_countfrom disconnectionsgroup by 1 ) as disconnson minstart = disconns.contime) as connects,( select count(*)as start_countfrom monitor.pg_stat_activity_start )as start_connects;
  70. 70. create table reports.connections_by_minuteasselect cast(minstart as time) as minstart,start_count +sum( conn_count - disc_count )OVER ( order by minstart )as connsfrom (...) as connects,( ...) as start_connects;
  71. 71. create table reports.connections_by_minuteas ...from (select minstart,coalesce(conn_count,0) as conn_count,coalesce(disc_count,0) as disc_countfrom log_minutesleft outer join( ... ) as connson minstart = conns.contimeleft outer join( ... ) as disconnson minstart = disconns.contime) as connects,( ... )as start_connects;
  72. 72. create table reports.connections_by_minuteas ...from log_minutesleft outer join( select date_trunc(minute,log_time) as contime,count(*) as conn_countfrom connectionsgroup by 1 ) as connson minstart = conns.contimeleft outer join( ... ) as disconnson minstart = disconns.contime) as connects,( ... )as start_connects;
  73. 73. presenting code● large, fixed-width font● colorize– not defaults!● break up long lines● snippet zoom
  74. 74. Does that mean I have toreformat all my examples?Yes, it does.
  75. 75. Quick&dirty colorization● Convert to HTML withhttp://pygments.org● Copy and paste from Chrome
  76. 76. Using TextMate?● Slush & Poppies (light)● Blackboard (dark)● Inconsolata / Consolas● Bundles TextMate Create‣ ‣HTML ...
  77. 77. Theres Always More Code!● Provide a text file for download● Demo through a terminal session● Give a link to your github account
  78. 78. Rehearse!● Do a run-through of the entirepresentation– out loud, standing up● Yes, really● Multiple times
  79. 79. rehearsal in front of ...● a mirror– body language, timing, flow● a friend/relative– clarity, pacing, the “um” problem● video– all of the above, exhaustively
  80. 80. Day Ofthe Conference
  81. 81. - 7 days● check the schedule– time of day– breaks, lunch– similar/complimentary talks● tweak content● double-check on special requests
  82. 82. - 1 day● check the room– location– configuration– acoustics– sightlines
  83. 83. - 1 day● check the projector– with your laptop● upload slides & materials● do last run-through● get some sleep!
  84. 84. - 1 hour● set up your demos● clear your laptop– turn off email, chat, skype, etc.– hide those personal pics
  85. 85. - 20 minutes● go to the restroom● head for the room– talk right before you? attend it
  86. 86. - 10 minutes● turn off your cell phone● empty your pockets● take off badge● put on mic● plug in laptop
  87. 87. Part I: 20% Execution
  88. 88. Lightning Talks
  89. 89. lightning talks● strictly 5 minutes– one simple topic● great practice– pacing, timing, topicality● Ignite Talks even better– 5min, 20 slides, auto-advance
  90. 90. The 7 Habitsof Highly IneffectiveSpeakers
  91. 91. 1. Chained To Your Chair(or Podium)
  92. 92. 2. About Me● Education– BrentwoodElementarySchool,GainesvilleFlorida– ClaremontColleges –Degree in Art!● Projects● Accomplishments– Founded first company at ageof 28– Once shook hands with EstherDyson– Predicted the dot-com crash– Nobel Prize for Peace forending vi/emacs flamewar
  93. 93. About Us
  94. 94. 3. PresentingFor TheBlind
  95. 95. Presenting for the Blind● Presenting for the Blind is where you readevery line of every slide.● It is extremely boring.● It also gives the audience the impressionthat you either think that theyre illiterate, orthat youve never seen these slides before.– Maybe you havent.● You can also read your notes directly off thepage.● A monotone is recommended.
  96. 96. 4. Dr.BronnersSchool ofSlide Design
  97. 97. 5. Bait & Switch
  98. 98. 7 pointsin descriptionvs.3 points covered
  99. 99. Working Code& Demovs.Just Slides
  100. 100. Expert Levelvs.Beginner Level
  101. 101. Beginner Levelvs.Expert Level
  102. 102. In-depth Technicalvs.Brochureware
  103. 103. 6. Time is an Illusion
  104. 104. 6. Time is an Illusion
  105. 105. 7. Panic
  106. 106. Six Stages of Panic1. Apologize to the audience2. Keep trying to get the demo or slides towork3. Apologize to the audience again4. Sit down and start hacking on your laptopto get it to work5. Apologize some more6. End the session early
  107. 107. 7 Ineffective Habits1. Chained to chair/podium2. About Me/Us3. Presenting for the Blind4. Too Much Crap on Each Slide5. Bait & Switch6. Lose Track of Time7. Panic
  108. 108. The 7 Habitsof Highly IneffectiveSpeakersDeconstructed
  109. 109. 1. Chained To Your Chair(or Podium)
  110. 110. 2. About Me● Education– BrentwoodElementarySchool,GainesvilleFlorida– ClaremontColleges –Degree in Art!● Projects● Accomplishments– Founded first company at ageof 28– Once shook hands with EstherDyson– Predicted the dot-com crash– Nobel Prize for Peace forending vi/emacs flamewar
  111. 111. 3. PresentingFor TheBlind
  112. 112. 4. Dr.BronnersSchool ofSlide Design
  113. 113. One Idea=One Slide
  114. 114. Less is More
  115. 115. If
  116. 116. you
  117. 117. are
  118. 118. paying
  119. 119. per slide
  120. 120. you
  121. 121. need
  122. 122. different
  123. 123. software.
  124. 124. Think Insidethe Box
  125. 125. 5. Bait & Switch
  126. 126. 6. Time is an Illusion
  127. 127. Use a timer!
  128. 128. 7. Panic
  129. 129. Audience Interaction 101
  130. 130. Eye ContactSpeaker Exercise
  131. 131. Eye ContactDO:● glance aroundthe room● make brief eyecontact● make eyecontact duringQ&ADONT:● stare at anyone person
  132. 132. Speaker ExerciseBody Language
  133. 133. Body Language Dos● have an “open” stance● stand straight to the audience● gesture● move around
  134. 134. Body Language Donts● hunch over● turn your back to the audience● put your hands in your pockets● “flap”● sit down– ( unless youre giving a demo )
  135. 135. Asking for a Response● Wakes the audience up● Ask about them– change your talk emphasis● Find out if youre boring them– critical in after-lunch and end-of-day spots
  136. 136. Jokes● even better way to wake up theaudience– and relax them● research joke material– current affairs for your audience– common rivalries
  137. 137. Jokes● Hard to get right– many jokes fall flat– some can offend people● Beta-test your jokes
  138. 138. Taking Questions● Throughout talk● End of each section● End of the talk● … just let audience know!
  139. 139. Questions you cantanswer
  140. 140. That Guy in The Third Row
  141. 141. Jesus in the Audience
  142. 142. Audience Participation● Small-medium audiences● Choose the right person● Plan it carefully– limited scope, timing, materials● Be ready to abort & do somethingelse● Offer a reward for participating
  143. 143. 7. When Your DemoCrashes
  144. 144. Your demo will crash
  145. 145. 3 things to count on1. Conference internet will fail… during your talk2. The hardware will fail… in unprecedented ways3. The software will fail… in unreproduceable ways
  146. 146. 7 ways to avoid demo failure1. Be unambitious2. Test the hardware3. Drill demo repeatedly4. Dont expect Internet5. Fake your demo6. Alternative demo7. Never do “cascading” demos
  147. 147. VMs and Demos● use a VM to “rewind” demos– Vagrant– VMware Pro● use multiple VMs to “skip” faileddemos● also great for tutorial handouts!
  148. 148. Fake your demos● screenshots● video● shell history● recorded shell sessions (ttyrec)● interactive shell scripts (IO::prompt)
  149. 149. Part III:the Audience OutsideThe Lecture Hall
  150. 150. the hallway track● good talk?people will buttonhole you● take discussion into the hallway– or to lunch, or to be pub– give the next speaker some space● bring business cards!
  151. 151. Sharing
  152. 152. Speaker NotesWho are they for? Not the speaker!
  153. 153. Speaker NotesIf the speaker notes for this slide wereto include literally everything I plan onsaying, like what you see here on theslide, then it would be way too muchtext for that tiny little text window at thebottom of the screen.
  154. 154. SlideSharehttp://www.slideshare.net/faqs/slidecast
  155. 155. AudioAudio or notes; you dont need both
  156. 156. VideoRecorded video of talk, orExport slides + audio to movie
  157. 157. notes on sharing● have a copyright statement on yourslides– CC is good● make sure your slides have contactinfo– for attendees– for people who download them
  158. 158. curate your talks● check talks into VCS– advanced slide formats work better with this● update slides for each venue● update code as tech updates
  159. 159. More Information● Josh Berkus– josh@pgexperts.com– www.pgexperts.com– @fuzzychef● talk:– www.pgexperts.com/tutorials.html– SlideShare.net/pgexpertsThis presentation copyright 2013 Josh Berkus and 2010 Josh Berkus & Ian Dees, licensed fordistribution under the Creative Commons Share-Alike License, except for photos, most of which werestolen from other peoples websites via images.google.com, and Sun presentations, the copyright onwhich is available at low, low rates.

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