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The role of Corporate Leadership in Educating Employees to Risk Management and Resiliency

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What is the role that corporate leadership needs to take in order to educate employees on risk management and resiliency? Corporate leadership is ultimately responsible for managing risk within the organization. This means that businesses leaders need to clearly and effectively communicate risk management to their employees and throughout the enterprise and its “value chain”. This presentation is aimed at supporting top management teams and company boards to educate their employees to risk management and resiliency concepts. This presentation will review the requirements and key elements of an effective risk management education program. You will gain ideas, concepts, and tools that will help you to develop your program and embed risk management awareness in your organization’s culture.

Main points covered:

• The composition of the crisis management team (CMT)
• Getting the CMT to understand its roles and responsibilities
• Ensuring that the organization understands resiliency roles and responsibilities
• Developing human capital to address crisis situations
• Leadership traits

Presenter:

Our presenter for this webinar is Geary Sikich, a Principal with Logical Management Systems, Corp. He is active in Executive Education, where he has developed and delivered courses in enterprise risk management, contingency planning, performance management and analytics. Geary is a frequent speaker on business continuity issues business performance management. He is the author of over 250 published articles and four books, his latest being “Protecting Your Business in Pandemic,” published in June 2008 (available on Amazon.com). Geary is a frequent speaker on high profile continuity issues, having developed and validated over 2,500 plans and conducted over 300 seminars and workshops worldwide for over 100 clients representing the spectrum of private and public sector operations.

Recorded Webinar: https://youtu.be/A1PMm95sYRM

Published in: Education
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The role of Corporate Leadership in Educating Employees to Risk Management and Resiliency

  1. 1. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved
  2. 2. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Geary W. Sikich: Books are available on www.Amazon.com www.alibris.com www.BarnesandNoble.com Geary W. Sikich, Principal: Over 28 years of experience in competitive intelligence, crisis management consulting, business continuity planning, human resource development, infrastructure protection, risk management, business “War Gaming” and special projects. Areas of Expertise: High profile business issues resolution, business continuity planning, crisis management, disaster recovery planning, risk management, competitive intelligence analysis, business “War Gaming”. Background: A recognized expert in the field of business continuity and crisis management planning. Author of four books and over 410 articles, papers and presentations on crisis management and business continuity issues. His latest book, ”Protecting Your Business in a Pandemic: Plans, Tools, for Maintaining Business Continuity," 2010, is available at Amazon.com.
  3. 3. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved The Role of Corporate Leadership in Educating Employees to Risk Management and Resiliency
  4. 4. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Corporate Leadership in Business Continuity Management Teamwork can be defined as a dynamic process involving two or more people engaged in the activities necessary to complete a task. Team leadership is defined by the team leader, who is the person appointed, elected or informally chosen to direct and coordinate the work of others in a group. Situation awareness refers to an individual’s perception of the elements in the environment within the volume of time and space, the comprehension of their meaning, and the projection of their status in the near future.
  5. 5. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Decision-making is the process of reaching a judgment or choosing an option, sometimes called a course of action to meet the needs of a given situation. Stress is defined as the adverse reaction people have to excessive pressure or other types of demand placed upon them. Fatigue is defined as the state of tiredness that is associated with long hours of work, prolonged periods without sleep, or requirements to work at times that are out of sync with the body’s biological or circadian rhythm. Work environment is defined as a set of circumstances or a situation that could harm a person’s interest, such as their health or welfare. Corporate Leadership in Business Continuity Management
  6. 6. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Key Concepts: A team is an intelligent entity The way the team thinks differs from how an individual thinks Team behavior can be studied as easily as individual behavior We infer mental processes from the team’s conscious experience (collective consciousness) Barriers to team consciousness result when there is a failure to share information with others Building an Effective Continuity Team
  7. 7. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Functions (Team Mind): Working Memory Long-Term Memory Limited Attention Perceptual Filters Learning Building an Effective Continuity Team
  8. 8. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved People + Tools + Structure Common mindset Training Recognition of Weaknesses, Hazards, Opportunities, Threats, Strengths, Underlying Plans (WHOTSUP) Active Analysis – Situational Awareness – Communication Focused efforts that build credibility Flexible structure that supports long term functional needs Building a sustainable decision analysis capability requires: Building an Effective Continuity Team
  9. 9. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Building an Effective Continuity Team Your biggest challenge: Getting the team to work together when they generally do not function every day as a team Getting the team to comprehend their crisis management role, responsibilities, functions and how they differ from their day-to-day roles, responsibilities and functions Your next biggest challenge:
  10. 10. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Team Competencies (TC) Team Identity (TI) Team Cognition (TC-1) Team Metacognition (TM) How good are the team members? Are they still struggling with basic procedures? Who’s taking responsibility? Do they spot and correct problems? Do they get crunched for time? Are they “territorial”? Does everyone know who does what? Do they help each other out? Is anyone micro-managing? Is anyone “out of it”? Is the CMT heading for the same goals? Does everyone have the same picture? Are they consistently in a reactive mode? Do they get paralyzed by uncertainty? Gary Klein: “Sources of Power: How People Make Decisions” Building an Effective Continuity Team
  11. 11. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved The Team – Three Levels Strategic Level – Saving the business Operational Level – Containing Business Unit Impacts Tactical Level – Operational Actions Leadership (Management) Planning Operations Logistics Finance Administration Infrastructure Internal/External Relations Key Functions
  12. 12. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Three Spheres of Concern SPHERE OF INFLUENCE Your assets and capabilities can affect the courses of action of others SPHERE OF INTEREST Assets and Capabilities of others can effect your courses of action SPHERE OF RESPONSIBILITY Your corporate mission, vision, values, goals, objectives
  13. 13. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved 6 Leadership Habits
  14. 14. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Anticipate Most of the focus at most companies is on what’s directly ahead. The leaders lack “peripheral vision.” This can leave your company vulnerable to rivals who detect and act on ambiguous signals. To anticipate well, you must:  Look for game-changing information at the periphery of your industry  Search beyond the current boundaries of your business  Build wide external networks to help you scan the horizon better
  15. 15. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Think Critically “Conventional wisdom” opens you to fewer raised eyebrows and second guessing. But if you swallow every management fad, herd-like belief, and safe opinion at face value, your company loses all competitive advantage. Critical thinkers question everything. To master this skill you must force yourself to:  Reframe problems to get to the bottom of things, in terms of root causes  Challenge current beliefs and mindsets, including your own  Uncover hypocrisy, manipulation, and bias in organizational decisions
  16. 16. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Interpret Ambiguity is unsettling. Faced with it, the temptation is to reach for a fast (and potentially wrongheaded) solution. A good strategic leader holds steady, synthesizing information from many sources before developing a viewpoint. To get good at this, you have to:  Seek patterns in multiple sources of data  Encourage others to do the same  Question prevailing assumptions and test multiple hypotheses simultaneously
  17. 17. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Decide Many leaders fall prey to “analysis paralysis.” You have to develop processes and enforce them, so that you arrive at a “good enough” position. To do that well, you have to:  Carefully frame the decision to get to the crux of the matter  Balance speed, rigor, quality and agility. Leave perfection to higher powers  Take a stand even with incomplete information and amid diverse views
  18. 18. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Align Total consensus is rare. A strategic leader must foster open dialogue, build trust and engage key stakeholders, especially when views diverge. To pull that off, you need to:  Understand what drives other people's agendas, including what remains hidden  Bring tough issues to the surface, even when it's uncomfortable  Assess risk tolerance and follow through to build the necessary support
  19. 19. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved Learn As your company grows, honest feedback is harder and harder to come by. You have to do what you can to keep it coming. This is crucial because success and failure-- especially failure--are valuable sources of organizational learning. Here's what you need to do:  Encourage and exemplify honest, rigorous debriefs to extract lessons  Shift course quickly if you realize you're off track  Celebrate both success and (well-intentioned) failures that provide insight
  20. 20. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved But, Does Having A Plan Guarantee Success?
  21. 21. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved ISO 31000 Training Courses • ISO 31000 Introduction 1 Day Course • ISO 31000 Foundation 2 Days Course • ISO 31000 Risk Manager 3 Days Course • ISO 31000 Lead Risk Manager 5 Days Course Exam and certification fees are included in the training price. www.pecb.com/en/education-and-certification-for-individuals/iso-31000 www.pecb.com/events
  22. 22. Copyright 2015, Logical Management Systems, Corp., all rights reserved THANK YOU ? gsikich@logicalmanagement.com www.logicalmanagement.com linkedin.com/in/gearysikich g.sikich@att.net

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