Sustainability in Ceilings

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Sustainability in Ceilings

  1. 1. Armstrong Suspended CeilingsPresented By: John Spicer Technical Sales Manager
  2. 2. Agenda Recycling Manufacturing Process Innovation - Product Performance - Fire Regulations New Products Acoustics Q&A2 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  3. 3. RECYCLING3 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  4. 4. Recycled materials Recycled materials used in the manufacture of ceiling tiles and grid systems are: Waste wools Aluminium Newspaper Chipboard Ceiling tiles Glass Cardboard Packaging Steel Plastic4 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  5. 5. Recycled content and raw materials The total recycled content will vary depending on the material… Definition of recycled Wet felt (‘hard’) material bonded 1) Pre-consumer Resin Metal tiles content (EN ISO mineral fibre tiles (‘soft’) mineral fibre ≈ 25% 14021:2001) Material diverted from the tiles stream during a manufacturing process. ≈ 19 - 70% waste Excluded is such as rework, 15 - 25% (rock wool) ≈ regrind or scrap generated in a process and The proportion, by mass, of capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it. ≈ 40 - 70% (glass wool) recycled material in a product or packaging. Only Wood tiles Suspension pre-consumer and post- 2)Post Consumer material ≈ 20 - 68% systems consumer materials shall be Material generated by households or by commercial, industrial and considered as recycled ≈ 30% (steel) institutional facilities in their role as end users of the product which can no content, consistent with the longer be used for it’s intended - 85% (aluminium) ≈ 50 purpose. This includes return of materials following usage of the terms. from the distribution chain.5 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  6. 6. Recycled content and raw materials Changes to raw materials have had an effect on environmental performance… Chipboard Bio-soluble wool Perlite Wood tiles Wet felt (‘hard’) mineral Wet felt (‘hard’) mineral fibre tiles fibre tiles Resin bonded (‘soft’) mineral fibre tiles Acoustic Fleece Gauge Reduction Metal tiles Suspension systems6 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  7. 7. Armstrong Recycling Programmes – End-of-Life and Off-Cut-Recycling End of Life (EOL) Recycling Programme End of Life Projects: Armstrong offers a free collection for refurbishment Grays Inn Road / strip out projects of Farnborough Air show 2000m2+, anywhere in the UK. Ceiling tiles are 100% Lancaster Court recycled into the mix and are processed into new ceiling tiles Off Cut Recycling Programme (OCR) Off Cut Projects: Off-cut ceiling tiles from University Hospital new ceiling installations are Birmingham stored on site in specially supplied bags and collected Peterborough Hospital by Armstrong to be recycled Tameside Hospital into new ceiling tiles Salford Hospital7 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  8. 8. MANUFACTURING PROCESS8 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  9. 9. Manufacturing Process Wet-Felt Mineral Fibre Tiles The wet felt pulp is deposited on a ‘conveyor belt’ where water is removed by a variety of techniques:- free drainage (gravity), pressing, vacuum & steam before being rolled to a level sheet at the required thickness. This pulp then goes into the gas fired drying ovens (approx 50-65% moisture content). The temperature of and time spent in the oven will depend on the formulation (starch especially affects the drying rate) and the thickness of the board. At the end of the drying ovens the board has any fissures or perforations rolled or punched into the board, gets sawn into the correct board size and with the appropriate edge detail as necessary. Tiles typically have a primer coat, one or two intermediate coats and a finishing coat. Calcite gets applied to tiles on the paint line as necessary. The number and application rate will vary depending on the finish (fissured, perforated or calcite). Product is packed face-to-face / back-to-back with cardboard dunnage, then shrink-wrapped and put into DC stock.9 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  10. 10. Manufacturing Process Soft Fibre Mineral Fibre Tiles Slag and basalt (rock wool) or sand, limestone, soda ash and recycled glass (glass wool) heated in furnace (approximately 1300- 1500ºC), droplets fall onto spinners creating fibres. A binding agent is then added to the fibres and then cured in an oven at approximately 200ºC. The thickness and density is controlled by the speed of conveyor belts and the amount of compression. The wool slabs are cut into boards and a rebated edge detail cut as necessary. Decorative and reverse scrims are glued to the board. Edges are painted as required. Product is packed face-to-face / back-to-back with cardboard dunnage, then shrink-wrapped and put into DC stock.10 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  11. 11. Manufacturing Process Metal Tiles The coil of the appropriate width for the type and size of tile to be manufactured is selected, and if required, the coil is fed into the perforating booth for perforating. The coil is then cut to the appropriate length and notched (depending on whether tile being made can be ‘notched on tool’) to create ‘blanks’. If perforated, the blanks need rolling to flatten out the curve induced during the perforating process. The blanks are then formed into tiles by either a power press, an automated folding machine, roll forming or hand formed using a brake press. The formed tiles are then washed and degreased before being painted.11 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  12. 12. Manufacturing Process Metal Tiles The tiles are hung on the paint line ‘conveyor belt’ and painted by electrostatically applying the polyester paint powder to the tiles and curing in an ‘oven’. The temperature in the ‘oven’ is just sufficient to cause the paint to melt/soften and fuse together forming a hard durable finish. Once painted, the tiles may have different types of acoustic infill applied… • A black non-woven fleece impregnated with a hot-melt glue can be heat sealed onto the back face of the tile. • For B15 acoustic infill, 15mm mineral fibre board is cut to size and glued to the back of the acoustic fleece. • Aluminium foil wrapped, black tissue faced pads are either supplied separately or loose laid into the back of the tile. It is possible for the pads to be ‘cassetted’ but this is not a standard Armstrong solution. Product is packed face-to-face / back-to-back with cardboard sheets between tiles and packed in a full cardboard carton, sealed and put into DC stock.12 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  13. 13. INNOVATION - NEW PRODUCTS13 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  14. 14. Innovation - CoolZone How do PCM cassettes actually function Partnership with BASF using Micronal encapsulated in the core of the cassette to be used in a suspended ceiling14 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  15. 15. Innovation - CoolZone 26oC 22oC A cooler surface temp. Also improves the thermal comfort of the space 26oC +/- 2.0oC Standard ceiling Surface 1 22oC +/- 1.0oC PCM ceiling Ch11 [C] Hour of the day15 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  16. 16. Innovation – CoolZone In the hot afternoon, the PCM cassettes suck up the heat and keep the room pleasantly cool. IN IN OUT16 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  17. 17. Overnight, they release the energy throughout the room while using the cool night ventilation to change back to their solid state. the PCM cassettes are now fully reset and ready for the next day. IN IN OUT17 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  18. 18. PRODUCT PERFORMANCE - ACOUSTICS18 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  19. 19. Acoustic comfort Benefits to users Offices Healthcare Education Provides Aids Helps meet confidentiality confidentiality BB93 regulation requirements Reduces fatigue Aids speedier Reduces and stress recovery vocal stress Improved Reduces fatigue Improves productivity and stress attentiveness & performance19 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  20. 20. Acoustic comfort The intelligibility, concentration and confidentiality balance Intelligibility Concentration Confidentiality MEETING ROOMS CONFERENCE ROOMS Combination of sound absorption and sound attenuation CLASSROOMS Medium density ceiling tiles LECTURE THEATRES20 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  21. 21. Acoustic comfort The intelligibility, concentration and confidentiality balance Concentration Confidentiality INDIVIDUAL CLOSED OFFICE Higher levels of sound attenuation CONSULTING ROOM Higher density ceiling tiles INDIVIDUAL BEDROOM21 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  22. 22. Acoustic comfort The intelligibility, concentration and confidentiality balance A WORD OF CAUTION: Concentration The same ceiling may have one type of room on Confidentiality one side of a partition, and another type on the other side. However, they may both (LARGE) OPEN PLAN AREA – have conflicting acoustic Higher levels of sound absorption ASSEMBLY / DINING / SPORTS requirements. HALL – 4+ BED WARD Lower density ceiling tiles22 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  23. 23. Acoustic comfort The intelligibility, concentration and confidentiality balance Intelligibility Concentration Confidentiality ACTIVE ACOUSTICS : Control background noise : overcome “occupational factor” FOR RETAIL BANKING, with sound masking HEALTHCARE, OFFICE Active acoustics take into account all sound and noise ENVIRONMENTS sources on-site to guarantee levels of intelligibility, privacy AND SCHOOLS and concentration.23 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  24. 24. FIRE REGULATIONS24 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  25. 25. Fire safety Fire Provide Euroclasses Resistance passive fire EN13501-1: Tests protection 2007 (BS/EN) “Designers are required to avoid foreseeable risks as far as is reasonably practicable, taking due account of other relevant design considerations. The greater the risk the greater the weight that must be given to eliminating or reducing it”25 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  26. 26. Fire reaction Legislation & regulations Table 10 in Approved Document B (volume 2) specifies the minimum performance requirement for these categories... For non-residential buildings these are… EuroClass (old) National rating classification Increasing performance Escape routes or corridors B-s3,d2 Class 0 Larger rooms a greater distance to exit the room C-s3,d2 Class 1 Small rooms (≤ 30m2) D-s3,d2 Class 326 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  27. 27. Fire safety Fire Reaction Fire Resistance UK EUROCLASSES Class 0 B – s3, d2 Stability (R) Class 1 C – s3, d2 Integrity (E) Class 3 D – s3, d2 Insulation (I)27 Armstrong Ceiling & Wall Systems 10/12/2012
  28. 28. Fire reaction Classification Why is the ‘EuroClass’ rating? The EuroClass is a fire reaction rating to EN 13501-1 What is Class 0 / Class 1 / Class 3? Class 0 is defined in the Building Regulations whilst Class 1 and Class 3 are performances determined by British Standard test BS 476:part 7 Why is Class 0 / Class 1 / Class 3 an old requirement? European harmonisation of testing for fire reaction of suspended ceilings requires Euroclass ratings to meet the Construction Products Directive28
  29. 29. Q&A

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