Scleritis

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Scleritis

  1. 1.  Scleritis affects people between the ages of 30 and 60 years old, and is very uncommon in children. Slightly occurs more frequently in women. Affects a population of more than 200,000 people, but less than 1 million.
  2. 2.  Scleritis is an inflammation of the sclera, which is the white outer wall of the eye. It is present within the entirety (depth) of the sclera. An eye and/or physical examination with blood tests are used to diagnose this disease. There are four types: › Diffuse anterior: The most common form. Presents with widespread inflammation of the anterior sclera. Accounts for 50% of scleritis cases. › Nodular: There are erythematous (red), tender, fixed nodules, which, in 25% of cases progresses to necrotising scleritis. Commonly reccurs. › Necrotising: 10% of cases- characterized by extreme pain and marked scleral damage. Associated with underlying systemic disease (See:Why?) › Scleromalacia perforans: 5% of cases. Known as necrotising without inflammation . Notable for lack of symptoms.
  3. 3.  Blurred vision Sensitivity to light (can be painful) Eye pain and tenderness Tearing of the eye Fever Vomiting Headaches Red patches on the white part of eyeball › Normal cases are mild redness to this area › Severe cases are extreme redness to this area
  4. 4.  Normally associated with auto-immune diseases such as: › Rheumatoid arthritis › Systemic lupus erythematosus › Sometimes the cause is unknown
  5. 5.  If not treated, significant loss of vision can occur. Normally treated with oral anti- inflammatory medications, corticosteroids, and sometimes immunosuppressive drugs, depending on the evidence of an underlying systemic disease. Doesn’t normally respond to topical eye drop medications. Being based upon certain incurable auto- immune diseases, many cases cannot be cured, but managed.
  6. 6.  Meisler, D. (1999, June 14). British journal of opthamology. Retrieved from http://bjo.bmj.com/content/83/4/410.full Carpenter, J. (2002, March 8). John hopkins; depiction of scleritis. Retrieved from http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/sebin/b/d/scleritis.jpg May, J. (2006, November 21). Legacy: Scleritis . Retrieved from http://legacy.revoptom.com/handbook/sect2g.htm Mary, D. (2002, January 9). Scleritis; an overview of symptoms and treatment. Retrieved from http://byebyedoctor.com/scleritis/ Barry, T. (2001, April 2). Scleritis; about.com. Retrieved from http://vision.about.com/od/sportsvision/p/Scleritis.htm

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