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Institutionalized Organization: Status and Prospects
John W. Meyer
Department of Sociology
Stanford University
Aug. 7, 201...
“Actors” in Journals
(Hwang 2008)
World Higher Education Students Per 10,000 Capita,
1900-2000
(Schofer/Meyer 2005)
Disciplinary Enrollment
as a Proportion of Tertiary Enrollment, 1965-95
(Drori/Moon 2007)
Professionals etc.
Service, etc.
Clerical, etc.
Managers, officials
Sales
Craftsmen, etc.
Operatives, etc.
Laborers
Househ...
           
VARIABLES Professional 
associationsa
Civil society
organizationsa
Trans-
parencyb
Government 
corruptionc
Bur...
VARIABLES Int’l Treaty
ratificationa
INGO 
membershipb
Env’l INGO
membershipb
Women’s 
INGO 
membershipb
Int’l 
Tourismc
T...
Independent          
variables (5-yr lag) GDP per capitab
Servicec
Industryc
Manu-facturingc,d
Agri-culturec
           
...
0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
3500
4000
1850 1870 1890 1910 1930 1950 1970 1990
Cumulative
Number of
INGOs
Cumulative Num...
2000, 63,000
1999, 59,902
1997, 53,100
1992, 30,400
1988, 18,500
1969, 7,258
1914, 3,000
1850, 2,5001800, 1,5001750, 1,250...
0
5
10
15
20
25
1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010
Year
No.Initiatives
Global Initiatives Regional, Industry, an...
CXOs, from Svejenova and Alvarez, 2016
Executive, Operating, Finance, Diversity, Risk,
Strategy, Development, Marketing,
A...
Stanford University, 2016:
The following University deans and administrators report to the Provost:
•Dean, School of Earth...
OMT Distinguished Scholar 2016 - John Meyer
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OMT Distinguished Scholar 2016 - John Meyer

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OMT Distinguished Scholar 2016 - John Meyer

  1. 1. Institutionalized Organization: Status and Prospects John W. Meyer Department of Sociology Stanford University Aug. 7, 2016. Academy of Management, Organization and Management Theory Division
  2. 2. “Actors” in Journals (Hwang 2008)
  3. 3. World Higher Education Students Per 10,000 Capita, 1900-2000 (Schofer/Meyer 2005)
  4. 4. Disciplinary Enrollment as a Proportion of Tertiary Enrollment, 1965-95 (Drori/Moon 2007)
  5. 5. Professionals etc. Service, etc. Clerical, etc. Managers, officials Sales Craftsmen, etc. Operatives, etc. Laborers Household service Farmers Farm laborers Percents: From Wyatt and Hecker 2006 0 5 10 15 20
  6. 6.             VARIABLES Professional  associationsa Civil society organizationsa Trans- parencyb Government  corruptionc Bureaucratic  efficiencyc             Population (log) 0.85*** 1.71*** 1.49*** -0.47*** -2.22**   (0.035) (0.034) (0.091) (0.130) (0.693) GDP p/cap (log) 0.32*** 0.27*** 0.08 -0.14* 1.33***   (0.022) (0.021) (0.058) (0.059) (0.223) Democracy 0.01*** 0.01*** 0.02*** 0.01*** -0.00   (0.002) (0.001) (0.004) (0.004) (0.014) Secondary Enrollment 0.76*** 0.43*** 0.18 -0.10 0.22   (0.070) (0.068) (0.176) (0.160) (0.677) Tertiary Enrollment 1.33*** 1.02*** 1.28*** -2.04*** 2.62***   (0.075) (0.072) (0.211) (0.157) (0.449) Constant -6.34*** -9.78*** -5.23*** 8.56*** -0.22   (0.212) (0.206) (0.575) (0.725) (3.966)             Observations 5,965 5,965 400 2,809 698 R-squared 0.656 0.747 0.832 0.163 0.160 Countries 147 147 115 121 119 Table 1: The effect of secondary and tertiary enrollments on the expansion of professions, organization, and rationalization of the state. Panel regressions with fixed effects. From Schofer et al. 2016 Standard errors in parentheses *** p<0.001, ** p<0.01, * p<0.05, + p<.10 a Source: Associations Unlimited (Gale 2014). b Source: Drori et al. 2006 c Source: World Development Indicators (World Bank 2014).
  7. 7. VARIABLES Int’l Treaty ratificationa INGO  membershipb Env’l INGO membershipb Women’s  INGO  membershipb Int’l  Tourismc Tradec FDI Inflowsc                 Population (log) 11.21*** 1.78*** 0.91*** 0.82*** 0.10* 3.25* 1.82**   (0.228) (0.054) (0.031) (0.036) (0.039) (1.406) (0.690) GDP per capita (log) 0.52*** 0.10** 0.10*** 0.12*** 0.10*** 12.05*** 1.41***   (0.141) (0.032) (0.019) (0.021) (0.012) (0.859) (0.395) Democracy 0.23*** 0.01* 0.02*** 0.00** 0.00 0.30*** 0.03   (0.010) (0.002) (0.001) (0.001) (0.001) (0.060) (0.028) Secondary Enrol. 4.99*** 0.65*** 0.51*** -0.12+ -0.14*** -4.09 -1.70   (0.457) (0.106) (0.059) (0.067) (0.027) (2.648) (1.259) Tertiary Enrollment 21.35*** 1.19*** 2.39*** 1.39*** 0.14*** 26.38*** 3.82**   (0.502) (0.111) (0.061) (0.068) (0.024) (2.813) (1.208) Constant -75.30*** -7.70*** -6.62*** -5.74*** -1.55*** - 82.89*** -24.79***   (1.394) (0.334) (0.187) (0.219) (0.253) (8.450) (4.274)                 Observations 5,803 5,176 5,529 5,159 1,220 5,422 4,373 R-squared 0.816 0.530 0.721 0.451 0.222 0.246 0.030 Countries 145 144 146 144 102 144 145 Table 2: The effect of secondary and tertiary enrollments on the global integration: world polity, world society, and the global economy. From Schofer et al. 2016. Standard errors in parentheses *** p<0.001, ** p<0.01, * p<0.05, + p<.10 a Source: Ecolex 2014; Normlex 2014; United Nations OHCR (2014). b Source: Yearbook of International Association (UIA, various years) c Source: World Development Indicators (World Bank 2014).
  8. 8. Independent           variables (5-yr lag) GDP per capitab Servicec Industryc Manu-facturingc,d Agri-culturec             Investment 0.30*** -1.38 13.53*** 1.94 -10.39***   (0.088) (2.322) (2.496) (1.611) (2.133) Secondary Enrollment 0.26*** 4.59** -0.62 0.13 -2.07   (0.071) (1.469) (1.550) (0.939) (1.364) Tertiary Enrollment 0.25** 7.04** -3.33 -3.26* -2.22   (0.084) (2.174) (2.238) (1.409) (1.837) GDP per capita, log 0.81***           (0.020)         Service   0.56***           (0.028)       Industry     0.59***           (0.028)     Manufacturing       0.56***           (0.029)   Agriculture         0.68***           (0.023) Constant 1.90*** 20.25*** 10.28*** 6.33*** 8.24***   (0.173) (1.345) (1.014) (0.597) (1.083)             Observations 1,317 981 984 837 988 R-squared 0.844 0.487 0.430 0.384 0.648 Number of newid3 161 154 155 153 154 Table 3: Effects of secondary and tertiary enrollments on GDP and relative size of economic sectors (as % of GDP), 1960-2010. 5-year pooled panel regression models with lagged dependent variable and fixed effects.A From Schofer et al., 2016 Standard errors in parentheses *** p<0.001, ** p<0.01, * p<0.05, + p<0.10 a All independent variables lagged five years, including lagged dependent variable. b Source: Penn World Table (World Bank 2014). c Source: World Development Indicators (World Bank 2014). D Note: The category “manufacturing” is a subset of the overall industry sector; mining, gas, electricity, water, and construction are excluded.
  9. 9. 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 1850 1870 1890 1910 1930 1950 1970 1990 Cumulative Number of INGOs Cumulative Number of International Nongovernmental Associations, 1850-1985 (Source: UIA) Note: Data prior to 1945 estimated based on founding dates from 1989 UIA Yearbook
  10. 10. 2000, 63,000 1999, 59,902 1997, 53,100 1992, 30,400 1988, 18,500 1969, 7,258 1914, 3,000 1850, 2,5001800, 1,5001750, 1,2501700, 1,0001600, 500 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 70000 1600 1700 1800 1900 2000Year No.Multinationals Cumulative Numbers of Multinationals. Source: (Gabel and Bruner 2003)
  11. 11. 0 5 10 15 20 25 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 Year No.Initiatives Global Initiatives Regional, Industry, and Company Initiatives Growth in Global, Regional, Industry, and Company CSR Initiatives Source: Lim & Tsutsui (2010).
  12. 12. CXOs, from Svejenova and Alvarez, 2016 Executive, Operating, Finance, Diversity, Risk, Strategy, Development, Marketing, Administration, Human Resources, Ethics, Knowledge, Innovation, Sustainability, Communication, Information, Compliance, Reputation, Public Relations, Public Affairs, Technology, Digital, Data, Talent, Leadership, Learning, People, Customer, Experience.
  13. 13. Stanford University, 2016: The following University deans and administrators report to the Provost: •Dean, School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences •Dean, School of Education •Dean, School of Engineering •Dean, Graduate School of Business •Dean, School of Humanities and Sciences •Dean, School of Law •Dean, School of Medicine •Director, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory reports jointly to President and Provost •Vice Provost and Dean of Research •Vice Provost for Budget and Auxiliaries Management •Vice Provost for Graduate Education •Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education •Vice Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity •Vice Provost for Teaching & Learning •University Librarian and Director of Academic Information Resources •Director of Hoover Institution reports jointly to President and Provost • Vice Provost for Academic Affairs • Senior Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs • Academic Secretary • Dean for Religious Life • Special Assistant to the Provost • Special Assistant to the Provost for Faculty Diversity • Director, Haas Center for Public Service reports jointly to the Provost and VP for Student Affairs • Vice Provost for Student Affairs • Director of Faculty/Staff Housing • Director of Athletics • Dean of Admission and Financial Aid • Dean, Continuing Studies and Summer Session • Vice President for Land, Buildings, and Real Estate reports jointly to President and Provost • Senior Associate Vice Provost for Undergraduate Residential Affairs •  

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