Edrr at connect 04282011

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  • Many people agree that Early Detection and Rapid Response offers an approach that will help prevent damaging and costly invasions from occurring in the first place.   But, how do you get an EDRR program started?  What are the key elements of a successful program?  At this session you will learn about The Nature Conservancy and Oregon Sea Grant’s  efforts  to develop volunteer-based early detection networks in Oregon.  We will share our successes, challenges, and provide tips and guidelines on how to start and maintain your own program.  Concerning your presentation, I would like you to speak about the weed watchers program:  history, successes, areas for improvement (if any), how to start the program in Montana, how to keep the program going once started, and anything else you think is necessary or helpful.  I saw that you have materials for starting your own program, maybe you could introduce each of these and we could have them to pass out to anyone interested. 
  • Asher: “Which is the most urgent?” Answer – about the same.Term emergency used easily in fire emergency “Emergency Fire Rehab” analogy.Topic of fire is tricky. He was trained to say that fire was not an “emergency”, they need to approach it without panicking. “Small infestations are just as much of an emergency and attacking small new fires”
  • New weed infestations need to be treated with the same urgency as new fire.
  • This Monday, May 3rd, Dan Durfey, Umatilla County Weed Supervisor and Dan Sharratt, ODA Regional Weed Specialist, confirmed a site of garlic mustard along the Umatilla River near Pendleton.  They have done an initial delimitation survey and have detected other infestations.  It currently looks like garlic mustard is spread over about 5,700 gross aces in the watershed and along about 20 miles of the Umatilla River.  
  • http://morro-bay.com/stealthispicture/images/western-snowy-plover2/western-snowy-plover-9450e.jpg
  • Some native plants, however, were unaffected by the invaders’ detrimental impact on the soil. This knowledge offers land managers some species that can be used positively as cover crops, or “nurse” plants.
  • http://evergreenmagazine.com/gallery/5316785823568666962/viewPhoto.htmlhttp://img.alibaba.com/photo/103255602/Boot_Brush_Shoe_Brushes.jpg
  • http://www.westerninvasivesnetwork.org/pages/plants.php
  • This is Rick Hall, Range Conservationist, pulling yellowstar he happened to see while on his regular duties in a Andrews Research Area in the Pubelo Mtns. Burns dist.
  • Prevention is the most cost-effective. Oregon Department of Agriculture estimates a benefit of $34 for every $1 spentPrevention is developed to change behavior and stop the spread of weeds or other invasives. It can be educational which encourages cooperation or regulatory which mandates compliance with rules.Early Detection- find the invader before it has a chance to rapidly spread and make efforts to eradicate it. When eradication is not possible, then contain the infestation. This not only reduces the cost of control but often prevents the need for expensive site restoration.Established Infestations- control or containment is prescribed for established infestations. Effective control often entails control treatments at the perimeter of an infestation. Control the perimeter and
  • 4. Will we provide staff (who?) representation for on-going and new partnership-projects such as the Middlefork USFS IGO/Middlefork Watershed Council False Brome Working Group, IAE Horton Meadow knapweed Control Work/Partnership, Willamette National Forest Research Project on False Brome, and others (or will we)? These projects provide valuable treatment information, community and agency connection and often added capacity to get work accomplished that we cannot do alone, but we need to invest time and funds to make them work.
  • False brome Partnership This group is made up of an interagency group of land managers in partnership with the Middlefork Watershed Council, who are focusing efforts within the Middle Fork of the Willamette Watershed to control false brome. The group is now broadening to address all invasive species within the watershed! Also note:MFWWC is launching EDRR programCritical importance of mapping – how can you prioritize if you don’t know what your options are?
  • Elements of an EDRR network1) Multiple partners2) Agreement on a list of priority species3) Agreement to respond to priority species4) Public educational component5) Priority areas or boundaries identified6) Monitoring by either staff or volunteers7) Mapping and tracking species and reports
  • Issue: How will we fund an updated invasive plant inventory for the District (or will we)?Our data is getting old and accurate NEPA analysis and control efforts would benefit from new data.
  • http://whatsinvasive.com/
  • (excluding Multnomah, Sandy Basin, and Clackamas Weed Watchers)
  • False brome Partnership This group is made up of an interagency group of land managers in partnership with the Middlefork Watershed Council, who are focusing efforts within the Middle Fork of the Willamette Watershed to control false brome. The group is now broadening to address all invasive species within the watershed! Also note:MFWWC is launching EDRR programCritical importance of mapping – how can you prioritize if you don’t know what your options are?
  • SWCD’s can have easy access to landowners and the least threatening presence as far as government goes. Landowner agreements can often be built in a matter of days or hours and are more maneuverable. SWCDs have the ability to essentially partner with any landowner in the County to treat or facilitate the treatment of invasives.
  • Elements of an EDRR network1) Multiple partners2) Agreement on a list of priority species3) Agreement to respond to priority species4) Public educational component5) Priority areas or boundaries identified6) Monitoring by either staff or volunteers7) Mapping and tracking species and reports
  • Utilize resources available such as Tania’s program materials. Go to meetings outside of your County to see what others are doing. This suggestion may be old-hat but I can tell you I would not have gotten as far as I am without having some sort of outline such as the Upper Willamette CWMA and your materials. The weed guide pamphlet has also been a huge help.
  • Edrr at connect 04282011

    1. 1. Developing Early Detection andRapid Response Networks in Oregon Why, How, and Resources for Getting Started TA N I A S I E M E N S SWCD CONNECT APRIL 28, 2011
    2. 2. Fire and Invader: How to Respond?a. A new fire is sighted.. b. A small isolated patch of yellow starthistle found on a road side.
    3. 3. 10 years later…a. Forest recovery with b. 150,000 acres of landvery little management infested with yellowintervention starthistle after very costly control efforts. Population continues to spread and cause damage.
    4. 4. Case Study: Garlic Mustard (Alliaria Petiolata)
    5. 5. Garlic Mustard
    6. 6. Now too close for comfort!May 2010 - Garlic mustard has spread 5,700 gross acres in the watershed and along about 20 miles of the Umatilla River!
    7. 7. Cost of Invasive Species$137 billion per year is the estimated economic losses in the United States due to invasive species83 million tax dollars spent on just 21 of the 91 noxious weeds in the stateCosts associated with the introduction of one invasive mussel infestation in the Columbia Gorge would exceed $25.5 million a year just for maintenance of 13 hydropower facilities.One invasive plant disease (Sudden Oak Death) is estimated to cost Oregonians $80-$310 million per year in lost nursery production if it becomes widely established.
    8. 8. It costs more than money to control invaders!Bulldozing Invasive Beach Grass is helping thesnowy plover – but what are the unintendedconsequences for native plants spices?
    9. 9. More than 40% of listed species aredeclining due to non-native species.
    10. 10. Impacts from Invasives• Reduce agricultural production• Limit recreation• Degrade wildlife habitat and forage• Crowd out native plants THIS?• Increase soil erosion• Decrease water quality by increasing temperature and sediment• And more…. Or THIS?Dyers woad
    11. 11. Invasive Plant Legacies?In a recent study, native species grown in soilconditioned with invasive species did worsethan what gown in soil conditioned with natives. Leafy Spurge Although a weed has been removed, it can leave behind negative effects in the soil. • Jordan et al. Evidence of Qualitative Differences between Soil-Occupancy Effects of Invasive vs. Native Grassland Plant Species Invasive Plant Science and Management 2011 4:11–21
    12. 12. WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT THESEINVADERS?Earth Day Issue, Eugene Weekly, April 21, 2011
    13. 13. HAVE HOPE!• Oregon still has a lot of areas that remain relatively free from harmful invaders• It has the lowest percentage of perennial stream length occupied by invasive plants compared to other western states.• N. Dakota 85%• California 45%• Utah 43%• Washington 42%• Oregon 38%
    14. 14. PREVENTHelp prevent the spread by cleaning gear and equipment!
    15. 15. Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR)!… is the most low-impact and cost-effectiveway to address the problem invasive plants, short of preventing the problem in the first place.
    16. 16. Typical Invasion Curve Demonstrating the value of EDRR
    17. 17. Addressing the problem early = more success, less cost!
    18. 18. EDRR IN ACTION!
    19. 19. Yellow Starthistle LESSON LEARNED? EDRR PAYS!$1 spent on prevention is $33 saved on control! (ODA)
    20. 20. What are the key EDRR components? Detection Support for Networks Interoperable planning Preliminary data sets/ Verification risk assessment Maps Adequate and Species List Vouchering flexible fundingIdentification Early Rapid Rapid Detection Assessment Response Education Experienced practitioners Multiple partners/Coordinated networks with defined rolesAdapted From: National Invasive Species Council. 2003. General Guidelines for the Establishmentand Evaluation of Invasive Species Early Detection and Rapid Response Systems. Version 1. 16
    21. 21. NETWORKS! The key to EDRR success!• Inter-agency cooperation!• Share roles and responsibilities!• Share distribution data!• Treatment Information!• Community Agency Connection!• Improved landowner relationships!• Added capacity!
    22. 22. False Brome PartnershipAre you willing to tackle any invader, alone???
    23. 23. More and More people and organizations are starting EDRR networks! Clackamas Columbia SWCD Gorge CWMALincolnSWCD
    24. 24. Determining your priority list• EDRR = Large Scale!• Look for species that are still not abundant and possible to control at the county scale.• Many counties already have species lists developed.• Suggest using ODA’s definition, only applied to the county scale
    25. 25. Oregon Dept of Ag Noxious Weed Lists
    26. 26. Mapping and Data Tracking is criticalWhy? Because we have to prioritize.For example: In the Willamette Valley, which invasive species do we control first? Giant hogweed? OR Scotch Broom?
    27. 27. Accurate distribution data needed!Giant hogweed? OR Scotch Broom?
    28. 28. Public and Staff trainings toget more eyes on the ground!• Overall trained over 1092 people! – 105 people 2007 – 252 people in 2008 – 423 in 2009 – 312 people in 2010Various Audiences:1) Volunteers2) Train the trainer3) Agency Staff and managers (BLM/USFS/ODF)4) Weyerhaeuser staff5) Students!
    29. 29. Educational Tools Jackson County Early Detection Network Model EDRR Plan
    30. 30. --Mix and Match Species – Modular EDRR ID GUIDE
    31. 31. Click on Interactive map for a list of species to report in your area!
    32. 32. http://whatsinvasive.com/
    33. 33. WHERE TO REPORT?http://oregoninvasiveshotline.org/
    34. 34. Select the county Click on Hybrid to Zoom In More
    35. 35. PLEASE include species identification, location, size ofinfestation and contact information Images are helpful!
    36. 36. 2010 Reports (number and species) (not including Portland) Knotweed Lesser celandine Yellow Flag Iris Spurge Laurel False Brome Shining geranium Old Mans Beard Yellow archangelWater primrose willow Purple loosestrifePhragmites australies Policemans Helmet Total number of reports: 56 Pokeweed Milk thistle Eurasian watermilfoil Meadow knapweed 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16
    37. 37. HOTLINE MANAGER VIEW
    38. 38. Now will get added to theiMapInvasives Database!
    39. 39. Outcomes of invasive species reports 2010 shared Need to be unknowninfo with verified 3%property 2% owner contacted 7% not a priority landowner 44 reports 7% 11% (78%) have had some level of response. mapped control plan in 12% place 26% 27 reports (48%) have follow up been needed 11% controlled or controlled there is 14% in planning some process planning in 7% place.
    40. 40. Who is responding?• The following organizations helped respond to priority species in their area: – County weed programs – City weed programs/volunteer programs – Oregon Department of Transportation – Oregon Department of Agriculture (for A listed species) – SWCD that have weed programs• Lesson Learned: Established, funded, weed programs critical to successful responses !
    41. 41. Defining Response Pathways
    42. 42. Role of SWCDs in EDRR?• Reach out to private land owners – this is one of the biggest gaps in EDRR networks!• No one else taking the lead? Use EDRR to meet your conservation goals!• CWMA’s are the force behind weed work when there is no weed district or weed management area!
    43. 43. OK, I want to engage in EDRRbecause it will help me reach my conservation goals and savemoney, but how do I get started?
    44. 44. Tip 1: Remember you are not alone!
    45. 45. More and More people and organizations are starting EDRR networks! Clackamas Columbia SWCD Gorge CWMALincolnSWCD
    46. 46. You don’t have to do it all by your self!
    47. 47. Tip 2: Find a Partner in Crime!• Find a partner in crime with an agency or other organization or person that is involved in your CWMA and has interest in weed control.• Share the work load and bounce ideas off of each other.• Or even multiple people – a separate EDRR committee if there that many willing participants!
    48. 48. Tip 3: Baby Steps!• Take baby steps so you don’t get overwhelmed!• Perhaps focus on one species, or one area, one audience, or one time of year.
    49. 49. Think about where can you fit in: Detection Support for Networks Interoperable planning Preliminary data sets/ Verification risk assessment Maps Adequate and Species List Vouchering flexible fundingIdentification Early Rapid Rapid Detection Assessment Response Education Experienced practitioners Multiple partners/Coordinated networks with defined rolesAdapted From: National Invasive Species Council. 2003. General Guidelines for the Establishmentand Evaluation of Invasive Species Early Detection and Rapid Response Systems. Version 1. 16
    50. 50. Can you…..?- Help put on a training for your staff or for the public?- Work with partners to decide priority species?- Receive and forward reports from the hotline?- Provide information to land owners?- Agree to respond to invaders for certain areas?
    51. 51. Tip 4: Utilize Existing Resources!
    52. 52. Tips 5: Take time to build relationships – EDRR is working together!
    53. 53. It is going to take all of us—landowners, landmanagers, recreationists, andconcerned citizens—workingtogether and sharing informationas quickly as possible, to keepahead of new weed invaders.
    54. 54. By working together we cancatch garlic mustard before it goes to seed…Thank you! Please feel free to contact me! tania.siemens@oregonstate.edu 1-541-914-0701
    55. 55. Who is reporting?• In 2010, 39 people submitted 56 reports.• Most reports come from just a handful of people.• Only 26 of the reporters (66%), had attended a weed watcher training.• 14 (36%) of those who reported were natural resource professionals!

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