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2.3.1 Models-Based Approach

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This presentation is part of the Outstanding Physical Education MOOC. More information can be found here https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/outstanding-physical-education

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2.3.1 Models-Based Approach

  1. 1. Models-Based Practice Designing a curriculum around learning outcomes The Buckingham School
  2. 2. 2 Question 1: What is your ultimate aim for teaching PE?
  3. 3. 3 Question 2: What types of things do your students need and what should your students’ learn and do?
  4. 4. 1 Present a problem
  5. 5. 2 Is there really a problem?
  6. 6. Present a different approach to PE through a Models-based practice 3
  7. 7. 4 Example of a models-based approach
  8. 8. Ask you to consider how you might use a Models-Based Approach 5
  9. 9. 1 Present a problem
  10. 10. 10 Quennerstedt, 2013 285 Clips 27 different countries
  11. 11. 11 Quennerstedt, 2013 What do you think was seen?
  12. 12. 12 Quennerstedt, 2013 Skills/drills Teacher-centred Dominant focus on physical performance
  13. 13. 13 Quennerstedt, 2013 One way of teaching physical education
  14. 14. 14 Warm Up, Skill and Game (Kirk, 2010)
  15. 15. Physical Education Netball (6 lessons) Hockey (6 lessons) Football (6 lessons) Swimming (6 lessons) Gymnastics (6 lessons) OAA (6 lessons) Multi-activity approach That is repeated year on year
  16. 16. Physical Education Netball (6 lessons) Hockey (6 lessons) Football (6 lessons) Swimming (6 lessons) Gymnastics (6 lessons) OAA (6 lessons) Year 7
  17. 17. Physical Education Netball (6 lessons) Hockey (6 lessons) Football (6 lessons) Swimming (6 lessons) Gymnastics (6 lessons) OAA (6 lessons) Year 8Year 8
  18. 18. Physical Education Netball (6 lessons) Hockey (6 lessons) Football (6 lessons) Swimming (6 lessons) Gymnastics (6 lessons) OAA (6 lessons) Year 9Year 9
  19. 19. Physical Education Netball (6 lessons) Hockey (6 lessons) Football (6 lessons) Swimming (6 lessons) Gymnastics (6 lessons) OAA (6 lessons) Year 10Year 10
  20. 20. 20 Question 3: How different is the way you teach to the way you were taught?
  21. 21. 21 Question 4: Is there a problem? Can one approach cater for all students diverse and individual learning needs?
  22. 22. 2 Is there really a problem?
  23. 23. 23 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-30341904 The BIG PE Conversation Armour & Mackopolou 2014
  24. 24. The common and shared purpose of PE is to provide learning experiences that will prepare young people to engage with the physically active life Goodyear et al., 2014
  25. 25. 47.1% of people suggested that PE had not helped them become physically active BIG PE CONVERSATION
  26. 26. 47.1% of people suggested that PE had not helped them become physically active BIG PE CONVERSATION Most participants were between 18-25
  27. 27. Girls disengagement is repeatedly reported as a challenge or concern – are we overcoming this?
  28. 28. Department for Health report concerns over health and argue that there is an urgent need to increase the number of people being physically active
  29. 29. OECD (2015) report that urgent action is required in schools to address physical inactivity and non- communicable diseases
  30. 30. DCMS (2015) called for new methods in schools to increase sport participation and increase physical activity participation
  31. 31. We might question then, is the dominant focus on skills, drills, and physical performance through a teacher-led approach is working?
  32. 32. 32 Could PE soon be up for…
  33. 33. 33
  34. 34. 34 Question 5; Is there really a problem?
  35. 35. Present a different option for PE: A models-based approach 3
  36. 36. To impact on the physically active life evidence suggests that we need to promote a range of learning outcomes Haerens et al., 2011; Kirk, 2013
  37. 37. Physical Competent movers – broad range of skills in a broad range of activities
  38. 38. Cognitive Creative movers – understand, develop, evaluate different ways of moving
  39. 39. Social Social Movers -– ability to reflect, discuss & talk about activity
  40. 40. Affective Confident, motivated movers who value the physically active life
  41. 41. To meet all of these learning outcomes, we need a number of different forms of PE and to move beyond an activity focus to a focus on learning Haerens et al., 2011; Metzler, 2011; Jewett et al.
  42. 42. Physical Education Netball (6 lessons) Hockey (6 lessons) Football (6 lessons) Swimming (6 lessons) Gymnastics (6 lessons) OAA (6 lessons) Instead of the multi-activity approach That is repeated year on year
  43. 43. A models-based approach organizes the curriculum around different learning outcomes and different approaches to teaching Metzler, 2011
  44. 44. A models based approach Health Based Physical Education Teaching Games for Understanding Adventure Education Sport Education Cooperative Learning Direct Instruction Tactical knowledge Analysis Interpersonal skills, reflection, confidence Sportsmanship, competition teamwork, officiating Physical and mental development – physical activity for the life course
  45. 45. Example: Three different models
  46. 46. Sport Education: focusses on sportsmanship, friendly competition, social aspects of sport
  47. 47. Students Complete seasons: pre-season, competition season, culminating event taking on different roles
  48. 48. Cooperative Learning: the development of social skills and confidence alongside developing movement competence
  49. 49. Students Work in small groups to solve problems and help each other with limited guidance from the teacher
  50. 50. Teaching Games for Understanding: developing students creativity and tactical abilities
  51. 51. Students Experience tactics first and skills second. They play in a serious of modified games with problems introduced
  52. 52. Thousands of studies since the 1990s report that models of PE meet the 4 learning outcomes and can promote the physically active life in both primary and secondary PE Casey & Goodyear 2015; Harvey & Jarrett, 2014; Hastie et al., 20
  53. 53. 4 Example of a models-based approach
  54. 54. At the Buckingham School we have been using Cooperative Learning for 5 years: based on the improvements to students learning we chose to adopt a models-based approach
  55. 55. We selected three models to use across, primarily, key stage 3: Sport Education, Cooperative Learning & Teaching Games for Understanding
  56. 56. A models based approach Teaching Games for Understanding Sport Education Cooperative Learning Direct Instruction Tactical knowledge Analysis Interpersonal skills, reflection, confidence Sportsmanship, competition teamwork, officiating
  57. 57. To help with planning as a department we identified units where each model would take place and developed resources to share
  58. 58. Christmas- Sept Jan-April April-July Year 7 Cooperative Learning Year 8 Sport Education Year 9 Teaching Games for Understanding 58 Each Year Group had a focus
  59. 59. Year 7 Cooperative Learning Activity Recommended method Resources compulsory CL Swimming Pair-check- Perform Stroke coaching cards Y Gymnastics Learning teams lesson by lesson resource cards. Y Athletics STAD Event by event coaching and measurement cards Y Racket sports Learning teams, pair-check- perform, Think-share -perform, numbered heads Badminton shot cards N Striking and fielding Learning teams, pair-check- perform, Think-share -perform, numbered heads Lesson by lesson cricket resources N Invasion games Learning teams, pair-check- perform, Think-share -perform, numbered heads N Health related fitness Jigsaw, Learning teams Fitness test cards, Fitness booklets, circuit training cards Y
  60. 60. Year 8 Sports Education Activity Compulsory SE CL option Swimming N Pair-check- Perform Gymnastics N Learning teams Athletics Y Racket sports N Learning teams, pair-check- perform, Think- share -perform, numbered heads Striking and fielding Y Invasion games Y Health related fitness N Jigsaw, Learning teams
  61. 61. Year 9 TGFU Activity Compulsory TGFU CL option Swimming N Pair-check- Perform Gymnastics N Learning teams Athletics N STAD Racket sports Y Striking and fielding Y Invasion games Y Health related fitness N Jigsaw, Learning teams
  62. 62. To develop the models-based approach we have worked together, discussed plans during meetings and held department CPD on models
  63. 63. Worked with Vicky During CPD sessions and via social media to develop our understanding of models and our use of them in lessons
  64. 64. Significant increases to students’ physical, cognitive, social & affective learning with heightened levels of engagement & enjoyment reported
  65. 65. 100% of lessons graded as outstanding. OFSTED observed a Cooperative Learning lesson and stated it was “Textbook Outstanding”
  66. 66. Ask you to consider how you might use a Models-Based Approach 5
  67. 67. 67 Question 6; Would you consider a models-based approach? If so what models would go where and why?
  68. 68. Christmas- Sept Jan-April April-July Year X Year X Year X Year X 68 What models would go where and why?
  69. 69. Models-Based Practice Designing a curriculum around learning outcomes The Buckingham School

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