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Charles dumol content marketing power of storytelling

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Charles dumol content marketing power of storytelling

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  1. 1. About Me  7 years in Web Development/Design  Learned SEO in 2011  Moved to Content Writing in 2007  Part of GDI
  2. 2. Storytelling as a Tool Once upon a time…
  3. 3. Storytelling as a Tool
  4. 4. Storytelling as a Tool Charles Dumol’s Official Marketing Man-Crush
  5. 5. Storytelling as a Tool Once upon a time…
  6. 6. Storytelling as a Tool VS. VS. VS.
  7. 7. Content Marketing means creating and sharing valuable free content to attract and convert prospects into customers, and customers into repeat buyers. The type of content you share is closely related to what you sell; in other words, you’re educating people so that they know, like, and trust you enough to do business with you.
  8. 8. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist  Craft Your Cornerstone  Make Your Content Worth Reading  Give your Content a Good Home  Create Content that Attracts a Wider Audience  Build an Email List Sooner than Later  Don’t Go Too Long Without Making an Offer  Go on Social Media… Once You’ve Got Something
  9. 9. Craft your cornerstone Topics that interest and engage your audience 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Play to your strengths • 10 Posts that encapsulates your core values/beliefs
  10. 10. Make your content worth reading Content is worth is worth reading if people read it. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Good content is: • Hooks the audience • Useful and problem solving • Entertaining
  11. 11. Make your content worth reading Content is worth is worth reading if people read it. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Good content is: • Hooks the audience • Useful and problem solving • Entertaining
  12. 12. Give your content a good home 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Invest in a good looking site design (e.g. a premium WordPress theme). Give it a secure environment Get your own site/domain
  13. 13. Create content that attracts a wider audience The next step after identifying and capturing your audience. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Think about new channels to market your content Explore new channels like interviews, webinars, guest posting.
  14. 14. Build an email list sooner rather than later Work that marketing funnel by building that list 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist A good way to train your readers
  15. 15. Don’t go too long without making an offer Don’t be afraid to make your pitch – this is still marketing after all. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Offer something your audience actually wants. Make a clear call to action
  16. 16. Go on social media… once you’ve got something Be part of the “third tribe”. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Let others be your evangelists. The last step.
  17. 17. THANK YOU!

Editor's Notes

  • Storytelling as a Tool - we need to talk about because it will be an important concept that will apply to the rest of this presentation. Think of it as a blanket truth that can be applied to building our audience as marketers.
    And as with all stories, let’s begin with the words: “Once upon a time…”
    This is a story that a lot of you might know – but wait… before we go on, I want to take a commercial break.
  • As marketers go, Seth Godin is an great in his field because he presents things in a practical manner – almost like telling a story.
    Discredit other marketers like Kiyosaki and Pulizzi .
  • A lot of you might already know this story, a lot of you might not, but this is a very iconic story that people of all ages will at least recognize.
    Tony Tan Caktiong was born to a working class family from China in 1960. He lived in downtown Manila and eventually got a BS degree in Chem Eng from UST.
    In 1975, he bought an ice cream franchise from Magnolia Ice Cream House. So, as the story goes, it had a fair amount of success in the beginning.
    He expanded in 1978 to 6 more branches, all of which no longer have ice cream as their best seller. So he decided it was time to create his own brand and took inspiration from the fast-rising American fast food chain – Burger Machine.
    In 1981, it went head-to-head with the arrival of McDonald’s in the Philippines and they came out okay.
    Jollibee is the first local fast food to hit the 1 billion mark in 1989 and the rest is history.
  • So the story of Jollibee vs. McDonald’s is not a unique one.
    All I’m saying is that these brands became successful because they had a unique story to tell to their customers.
    This story spread from person to person until they were totally convinced that you had to be an absolute loser not to sign up with their brand.
    This is why storytelling can be such a powerful tool when building both your audience and your business.
  • Now on to the boring stuff…
    Content Marketing definition by Copyblogger
    Ask Grant to read
  • Think of these as general strategies for you to go about growing your audience and your business.
    Here is a short Content Marketing checklist you can use to build your story
  • This is where you deliver your marketing philosophy and play to your strengths
    Pull in your best work and make this the foundation of your site or your business.
    The advice here is to create 10 initial posts on your site then make these solid content landing pages for your readers.
    This makes it easier to focus your SEO copywriting efforts that will naturally attract traffic and links.
  • This one is tricky
    Hooks the audience from the headline down to the actual content
    If you can’t seem to get any traction, look into getting a seasoned writer to make some of your content
    The best tool to use is… storytelling (ask them to read the font size 110 text)
    But Sir Charles I’m not a writer…
  • Creating a good home means owning the brand that you’re building
    This means that you have to be in complete control of it from its foundation up
    Building a brand means owning it and you can’t do that from someone else’s domain.
    Don’t get me wrong! I’m not saying this just for the sake of “art” and making your site look “pretty”. However, the Internet crowd can be very critical and picky about what they consume.
    Security includes the SEO side: check for negative SEO tactics or bad backlinks.
  • After setting your cornerstone and testing your audience, this is the next step.
    At this point, you can start to experiment with new things – test the waters and see how your audience reacts.
    This will set them up for bigger things that you may plan in the future.
    Don’t forget to point your new audience back to your site; you can even create new landing pages especially for your new audience.
  • Deepen your customer or audience relationship by creating your mailing list.
    Mention Andy Jenkins.
    Make it sound like an exclusive club where they can get a lot of insider info by subscribing.
    It’s a good way to train your readers to take a specific action.
    DON’T SPAM!
  • Don’t be afraid to make your pitch, but don’t be the used car salesman
    If you produce great content, then what you offer will be something that the audience will want.
  • Third tribe: Hard-sell, hard ball type of marketer and the cool but broke blogger.
    Make use of content marketing best practices while delivering it in a passionate and personal voice.
    Social media is the new campfire with which people gather and share stories.
    Talk about the story of GDI, where Glen believes in creating a good product before marketing it out to the world. Many do it the other way round; a case of buying the cart before the horse.
    In the end, if you have a good product, it’s your audience that will tell stories about your product – you don’t have to do the work.
  • On a final note, here is the revised cover of Seth Godin’s book.
    He tells us we are all liars; we tell ourselves stories for various reasons and that marketers are a special kind of liar.
    Godin appends these words however by saying that he isn’t promoting the thought of marketers being the biggest liars on the planet.
    He actually apologizes for the initial cover.
    Rather, he says that they are one of the biggest storytellers the modern world has to offer.
    So the moral of the lesson is: if you want to build your audience, make them trust you and build a strong relationship with that trust, then use the power of stories to drive your business forward.
    I’ve been telling stories to you guys for the past 20 minutes – Jollibee’s, GDI’s and a lot of others – but now what I want you guys to do, when you get the chance, is tell us your own. Meet ups like this is a great opportunity to go out and network – tell everyone what your story is. And how do you do that? Storytelling
    1. 1. About Me  7 years in Web Development/Design  Learned SEO in 2011  Moved to Content Writing in 2007  Part of GDI
    2. 2. Storytelling as a Tool Once upon a time…
    3. 3. Storytelling as a Tool
    4. 4. Storytelling as a Tool Charles Dumol’s Official Marketing Man-Crush
    5. 5. Storytelling as a Tool Once upon a time…
    6. 6. Storytelling as a Tool VS. VS. VS.
    7. 7. Content Marketing means creating and sharing valuable free content to attract and convert prospects into customers, and customers into repeat buyers. The type of content you share is closely related to what you sell; in other words, you’re educating people so that they know, like, and trust you enough to do business with you.
    8. 8. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist  Craft Your Cornerstone  Make Your Content Worth Reading  Give your Content a Good Home  Create Content that Attracts a Wider Audience  Build an Email List Sooner than Later  Don’t Go Too Long Without Making an Offer  Go on Social Media… Once You’ve Got Something
    9. 9. Craft your cornerstone Topics that interest and engage your audience 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Play to your strengths • 10 Posts that encapsulates your core values/beliefs
    10. 10. Make your content worth reading Content is worth is worth reading if people read it. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Good content is: • Hooks the audience • Useful and problem solving • Entertaining
    11. 11. Make your content worth reading Content is worth is worth reading if people read it. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Good content is: • Hooks the audience • Useful and problem solving • Entertaining
    12. 12. Give your content a good home 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Invest in a good looking site design (e.g. a premium WordPress theme). Give it a secure environment Get your own site/domain
    13. 13. Create content that attracts a wider audience The next step after identifying and capturing your audience. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Think about new channels to market your content Explore new channels like interviews, webinars, guest posting.
    14. 14. Build an email list sooner rather than later Work that marketing funnel by building that list 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist A good way to train your readers
    15. 15. Don’t go too long without making an offer Don’t be afraid to make your pitch – this is still marketing after all. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Offer something your audience actually wants. Make a clear call to action
    16. 16. Go on social media… once you’ve got something Be part of the “third tribe”. 7 Step Content Marketing Checklist Let others be your evangelists. The last step.
    17. 17. THANK YOU!

    Editor's Notes

  • Storytelling as a Tool - we need to talk about because it will be an important concept that will apply to the rest of this presentation. Think of it as a blanket truth that can be applied to building our audience as marketers.
    And as with all stories, let’s begin with the words: “Once upon a time…”
    This is a story that a lot of you might know – but wait… before we go on, I want to take a commercial break.
  • As marketers go, Seth Godin is an great in his field because he presents things in a practical manner – almost like telling a story.
    Discredit other marketers like Kiyosaki and Pulizzi .
  • A lot of you might already know this story, a lot of you might not, but this is a very iconic story that people of all ages will at least recognize.
    Tony Tan Caktiong was born to a working class family from China in 1960. He lived in downtown Manila and eventually got a BS degree in Chem Eng from UST.
    In 1975, he bought an ice cream franchise from Magnolia Ice Cream House. So, as the story goes, it had a fair amount of success in the beginning.
    He expanded in 1978 to 6 more branches, all of which no longer have ice cream as their best seller. So he decided it was time to create his own brand and took inspiration from the fast-rising American fast food chain – Burger Machine.
    In 1981, it went head-to-head with the arrival of McDonald’s in the Philippines and they came out okay.
    Jollibee is the first local fast food to hit the 1 billion mark in 1989 and the rest is history.
  • So the story of Jollibee vs. McDonald’s is not a unique one.
    All I’m saying is that these brands became successful because they had a unique story to tell to their customers.
    This story spread from person to person until they were totally convinced that you had to be an absolute loser not to sign up with their brand.
    This is why storytelling can be such a powerful tool when building both your audience and your business.
  • Now on to the boring stuff…
    Content Marketing definition by Copyblogger
    Ask Grant to read
  • Think of these as general strategies for you to go about growing your audience and your business.
    Here is a short Content Marketing checklist you can use to build your story
  • This is where you deliver your marketing philosophy and play to your strengths
    Pull in your best work and make this the foundation of your site or your business.
    The advice here is to create 10 initial posts on your site then make these solid content landing pages for your readers.
    This makes it easier to focus your SEO copywriting efforts that will naturally attract traffic and links.
  • This one is tricky
    Hooks the audience from the headline down to the actual content
    If you can’t seem to get any traction, look into getting a seasoned writer to make some of your content
    The best tool to use is… storytelling (ask them to read the font size 110 text)
    But Sir Charles I’m not a writer…
  • Creating a good home means owning the brand that you’re building
    This means that you have to be in complete control of it from its foundation up
    Building a brand means owning it and you can’t do that from someone else’s domain.
    Don’t get me wrong! I’m not saying this just for the sake of “art” and making your site look “pretty”. However, the Internet crowd can be very critical and picky about what they consume.
    Security includes the SEO side: check for negative SEO tactics or bad backlinks.
  • After setting your cornerstone and testing your audience, this is the next step.
    At this point, you can start to experiment with new things – test the waters and see how your audience reacts.
    This will set them up for bigger things that you may plan in the future.
    Don’t forget to point your new audience back to your site; you can even create new landing pages especially for your new audience.
  • Deepen your customer or audience relationship by creating your mailing list.
    Mention Andy Jenkins.
    Make it sound like an exclusive club where they can get a lot of insider info by subscribing.
    It’s a good way to train your readers to take a specific action.
    DON’T SPAM!
  • Don’t be afraid to make your pitch, but don’t be the used car salesman
    If you produce great content, then what you offer will be something that the audience will want.
  • Third tribe: Hard-sell, hard ball type of marketer and the cool but broke blogger.
    Make use of content marketing best practices while delivering it in a passionate and personal voice.
    Social media is the new campfire with which people gather and share stories.
    Talk about the story of GDI, where Glen believes in creating a good product before marketing it out to the world. Many do it the other way round; a case of buying the cart before the horse.
    In the end, if you have a good product, it’s your audience that will tell stories about your product – you don’t have to do the work.
  • On a final note, here is the revised cover of Seth Godin’s book.
    He tells us we are all liars; we tell ourselves stories for various reasons and that marketers are a special kind of liar.
    Godin appends these words however by saying that he isn’t promoting the thought of marketers being the biggest liars on the planet.
    He actually apologizes for the initial cover.
    Rather, he says that they are one of the biggest storytellers the modern world has to offer.
    So the moral of the lesson is: if you want to build your audience, make them trust you and build a strong relationship with that trust, then use the power of stories to drive your business forward.
    I’ve been telling stories to you guys for the past 20 minutes – Jollibee’s, GDI’s and a lot of others – but now what I want you guys to do, when you get the chance, is tell us your own. Meet ups like this is a great opportunity to go out and network – tell everyone what your story is. And how do you do that? Storytelling
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