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#1NWebinar: Digital on the Runway

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With Fashion Week to inspire us, this webinar focuses on sharing a few favorite digital trends for 2018. Instead of discussing denim separates and art-inspired prints, our team explores hot digital to keep an eye on. The webinar focuses on emerging technologies, exciting design trends and standout digital strategies to adopt in the new year.

Associate Creative Director Jessica DeJong and Chief Strategist Kalev Peekna dive into concepts that could disrupt how we think about digital experiences, as well as trends to easily fold into your 2018 marketing strategy.

Access the full recording: https://youtu.be/N_4XAsXDoYI

Published in: Design
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#1NWebinar: Digital on the Runway

  1. 1. Digital on the Runway Prepared by / 13 February 2018 Kalev Peekna & Jessica DeJong
  2. 2. Chief Strategist Kalev Peekna Associate Creative Director Jessica DeJong
  3. 3. TRENDS! It’s fashion week! This is Kalev’s March Madness.
  4. 4. “If one more person interrupts this meeting to congratulate a grown-a** man who bounces a ball for a living, I swear I’ll stream Fashion Week on every monitor in this office.”
  5. 5. Why Look Out of Industry? 1. Y’all spend way too much time looking at each other anyway. 2. “Best practices” lead to competence, not innovation. 3. And finally, sometimes…
  6. 6. …You Must Leave the Shire to Have a Real Adventure! Take it from your friendly neighborhood One North hobbit. It’s true.
  7. 7. AI VB PWAs DT Artificial Intelligence in Digital Marketing Voice of Brand Progressive Web Apps Design Thinking Design Systems Revenge of the Mouse Mondrianism Fluid Geometry Black Rebellious Design
  8. 8. 1. Artificial Intelligence The Robots Have Arrived
  9. 9. AI Hype
  10. 10. Who is already working with artificial intelligence?
  11. 11. So, what exactly is AI? • Artificial intelligence is simply a machine’s ability to parse large amounts of data and identify patterns in order to perform tasks that would otherwise require human intelligence. • “AI” is an umbrella term. It includes visual perception, speech recognition, decision-making, pattern recognition, and language translation.
  12. 12. AI: The Buzzword Du Jour All the big names in tech are investing in AI: • Google’s AlphaGo, PAIR • Salesforce Einstein • Adobe Sensai • IBM Watson • Facebook FAIR • Uber, Spotify, Amazon …
  13. 13. Voice & Chatbots Voice inputs, chatbots, and conversational UIs AI in Marketing Strategy Search Advanced search algorithms use forms of AI Virtual Reality/ Augmented Reality Brand, storytelling Personalization Content recommendations and content curation Programmatic Creative A/B testing, Design Marketing Automation Email Marketing, CRM
  14. 14. Examples
  15. 15. VUI (Voice Activated UI)
  16. 16. The North Face: Personalizing Search • The North Face paired with IBM’s Watson to completely reimagine the product search experience. • Instead of complicated filters, or endless suggestions, it asks targeted questions about where, when, and how you will use the product – and provides truly intelligent suggestions.
  17. 17. VR / AR in Digital Retail Houzz iOS App Researchers from Neilsen and YuMe found that VR prompted a 27% higher reaction in users and kept them engaged for 34% longer.
  18. 18. Both big and small media outlets are telling new kinds of stories by intermixing traditional article snippets with elements of VR and AR. https://www.ibm.com/thought-leadership/hidden-figures/ VR / AR Content
  19. 19. Progressive Web Apps2. Voice of Brand I’m Afraid I Can’t Do That, Dave.
  20. 20. Conversational User Interfaces “A conversational interface is any UI that mimics chatting with a real human. The idea here is that instead of communicating with a computer on its own inhuman terms — by clicking on icons and entering syntax-specific commands — you interact with it on yours, by just telling it what to do.” https://www.fastcodesign.com/3058546/conversational-interfaces-explained
  21. 21. “Why don’t you just TELL me what you want?!”
  22. 22. Conversational UIs in the Wild • Digital Assistants – Alexa, Siri, Cortana, Google • Assisted Search – Watson, Oracle • Messenger Bots – SMS, Facebook Messenger, Whatsapps • Chat Network Bots – Slack, HipChat • More to come!
  23. 23. Surprise! More Hype.
  24. 24. Examples
  25. 25. Travel Bots Many travel providers see conversational UIs as a better way to guide customers through complex interactions. Through Facebook Messenger, KLM passengers can check status, check in, purchase new flights, and even change itineraries. Users make fewer mistakes because their choices are more focused and guided.
  26. 26. Content Consumption Quartz’s mobile app is a completely different way to read the news. While its website is focused on wide browsing and deep reading, the mobile app is all about quick interactions and updates.
  27. 27. Content Consumption The New York Times app allows direct conversation with an actual journalist (not a bot), providing a unique way to explore the 2018 Olympics in PyeongChang. Users of its iOS apps can get notifications, ask questions, and suggest viewing choices.
  28. 28. Retail Alexa, I need batteries. Robot Strategist Just as smart but doesn’t get cranky when hungry.
  29. 29. Even Professional Sites
  30. 30. Impact of AI and Conversational UIs on Brand
  31. 31. Is Voice the Death of Brand? Scott Galloway has recently warned that conversational UIs could fundamentally disrupt and degrade our brand relationships. Because conversational UIs mediate the experience between a user and the content or purchases they want, they exert more control over user choice, and in some instances erase the brand experience altogether. For his full talk, see: https://vimeo.com/217129633 Scott Galloway Professor of Marketing NYU Stern School of Business Harbinger of Brand Death
  32. 32. How it Happens Alexa, I need batteries. To help me search, tell me more about what kind of batteries you need. I need AA batteries. Amazon’s Choice is Amazon Basics AA Batteries, 12-count. Would you like to buy it?
  33. 33. It’s Happened Before Airlines used to compete on brand. The OTAs (Expedia, Orbitz, Priceline, Kayak) changed all of that. Users now make choices almost exclusively on price, so that’s how airlines now compete. Airlines went bankrupt trying to accommodate this change. The next time an airline shrinks a seat, removes a perk, adds a fee, or otherwise makes your life more miserable, you’ll know it’s all because of these guys. Pro tip: it’s also why there’s a bigger divide between the have and have-nots of airline status.
  34. 34. What is the Voice of Your Brand? Even if you don’t buy into Galloway’s view, the rise of conversational interfaces raises interesting questions: • What is your brand’s literal voice? High? Low? Age? Accent? • What is your brand’s personality? Authoritative? Explorative? Optimistic? Reassuring? • How does it interact? Is it a “sage on the stage” or “guide on the side?” • Where does it come from? What is its relatable backstory?
  35. 35. Progressive Web Apps3. Progressive Web Apps The Mobile Experience You’ve Always Deserved
  36. 36. PWAs are responsive websites that act and feel like native apps.
  37. 37. PWAs are just a higher bar for user experience on websites.
  38. 38. Examples
  39. 39. PWA SECONDS + Downloaded all stories in section for offline reading + Downloaded all related linked stories on the page Spoaklng of Sclonc.o Scientists say they've. ., found a planet orbiting Proxima Cenlauri, our closest neighbor By Rachel Feltman A1t,1:;I :;,41 ?016i,11:00PM Scientists sav thev've.. •' found a planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, our closest neighbor Scienllsls hc:ii.·� d1scov-i::!red u planet l 1at U1cy thri k ,s similar to Earth. They're call ne; it Proxima band tisjust 4.2 light years from [a<th. (R()Ut()rsl MAX SCHERZER AUGUST26 705PM NO·JIJITEFIBIIB8l.ffiEAIJ natronals.com Original mobile site SECONDS
  40. 40. m.uber.com • Designed to work well on intermittent networks • 3s interactive on 2G
  41. 41. m.uber.com • Designed to work well on intermittent networks • 3s interactive on 2G
  42. 42. app.starbucks.com • 0.4% size of its native app counterpart • arguably better UX
  43. 43. Is a PWA Right for My Project? Good candidates for PWAs: • Ideal for content/projects that encourage regular engagement • Ideal for projects with a large mobile audience • Any existing native apps • Projects offering unique content or experiences Ideas: • Thought leadership (using personalized push notifications) • Events • Recruiting • Client tools / portals / references • Business development tools
  44. 44. Is a PWA Right for My Project? Good candidates for PWAs: • Ideal for content/projects that encourage regular engagement • Ideal for projects with a large mobile audience • Any existing native apps • Projects offering unique content or experiences Ideas: • Thought leadership (using personalized push notifications) • Events • Recruiting • Client tools / portals / references • Business development tools
  45. 45. 4. Design Thinking A Different Way to Create Innovation
  46. 46. What is Design Thinking? Design Thinking is a human-centered approach to innovation that draws from the designer's toolkit to integrate the needs of people, the possibilities of technology, and the requirements for business success. – Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO
  47. 47. Putting the Design Up Front Design Thinking is a type of strategy or solutions framework. The biggest change it makes is moving the activities of design to the front of the process. Consider a standard solutions approach: Plan Research Analyze Define Design Implement
  48. 48. Putting the Design Up Front Design Thinking not only moves Design up to the front of the process, it also reimagines how it happens. Linear, analytical, and rigid processes are replaced by flexible, iterative, and imaginative tools and disciplines. “Design” Inspiration Ideation Implementation Build & Release Repeat Frequently
  49. 49. Core Principles of Design Thinking • It’s Not a Process – it’s a toolbox of techniques used to understand and create solutions. • It’s about Creation and Change – this is why it’s so often called upon in the context of “disruption.” • It’s Human Centered – it’s less about markets, products, and money than about people, aims, and needs. • It’s Collaborative – it requires teams, and eschews the myth of the lone genius. • It’s Nonlinear – it doesn’t follow a straight line to progress. Think of it as the chaos that fights chaos.
  50. 50. Three Core Modes All of the activities and tools that make up Design Thinking serve one or more of three core modes of thinking: inspiration, ideation and implementation. Most teams start at inspiration, proceed to ideation and finish at implementation. But the path is often messy, and teams may move back or repeat modes. Inspiration IdeationImplementation
  51. 51. Inspiration Techniques There are many research techniques that spark inspiration. What they all share is that they are focused on people: Interviews 1:1 observational discussions to discover needs and context. Group Interviews Group discussions to discover needs and tease out outliers and differences. Immersive Studies Visiting the site of a product or service – observing users- in-action. Intercepting users to interview in-context. Card Sorting Asking users to group and/or prioritize concepts or themes to understand how they categorize their needs. Collage / Drawing Inviting user to express abstract needs (like “trust”) through visual tools. Guided Tour Having a user – not an organization – take you through a process or workspace.
  52. 52. Ideation Techniques The Ideation techniques are all fundamentally collaborative, and can be used just as fruitfully to refine an existing idea as they can to create a new idea. Design Brief Iterating on your project brief, using insights to focus your goals on design objectives. Brainstorming Quick, collaborative discussions to produce as many ideas as possible within a specific timeframe. Storyboarding Mixing visuals with narrative to illustrative how ideas might play out. Design Principles Self-imposed constraints that articulate shared needs, themes, techniques, etc. Concept A visual or narrative illustration of an idea – but not the final “design.” How Might We … Focusing ideation on a single- problem to unlock a flow of ideas.
  53. 53. Implementation Techniques Implementation is really about prototyping your ideas. Prototypes aren’t just for physical products; they can work just as well for more abstract problems like services or marketing. Scenario Step-by-step illustration of the experience you are trying to create Wireframe Quick sketch of an interface – digital or analog – that you expect people to use Mockup Higher-fidelity design that gives an intellectual and emotional impression of look and feel Samples & Artifacts It might be content, an image, a physical object, or space – any artifact that people will use or encounter. Storytelling A compelling narrative that not only explains, but also wins hearts and minds
  54. 54. Suggested Reading Change by Design, Tim Brown The Field Guide to Human-Centered Design, IDEO Harvard Business Review, September 2015 This is Service Design Thinking I’m interested How does it work? I want to get started
  55. 55. Examples
  56. 56. GMA Village – Oakland, CA THE PROBLEM Childcare is expensive, hard to find, and good at spreading colds. Especially in high-cost, low-income areas like Oakland. THE SOLUTION Create a peer-to-peer network that makes arranging childcare more efficient, and brings to market an untapped source of highly experienced labor: retired grandmothers. WHY DESIGN THINKING WORKED It was only by participating in parents’ daily lives that the Design Thinking team at TLabs literally stumbled across the ad hoc childminders who inspired the solution. My grandmothers wore wigs, but they were never that on point. www.slate.com/blogs/better_life_lab/2017/11/01/are_grandmas_t he_answer_to_america_s_child_care_woes.html
  57. 57. But Can It Work in PSOs? Ask Miles & Stockbridge. As Chief Experience Officer, Edwin Bodensiek’s brief is to “extend the concept of brand beyond marketing.” Miles and Stockbridge is actively using Service Design techniques to improve the: • Candidate experience • Employee experience • Visitor experience • Outreach experience • Client Service experience https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/new-wave-branding-customer-experience-its-what- you-think-bodensiek/
  58. 58. 5. Design Systems Documenting Your Brand Digitally + Responsive Logos
  59. 59. Also known as … You also hear design systems referred to as: Atomic Design Pattern Library Design Language Digital Style Guide Design Standards Style Guides
  60. 60. Design Systems: Before
  61. 61. In this age of device diversity, we need to focus more on patterns than pages. Digital design systems are the answer.
  62. 62. Examples
  63. 63. styleguides.io
  64. 64. Responsive Logos Logos for the Digital World
  65. 65. 6. Mondrianism Geometric Layouts & Primary Colors
  66. 66. 7. Fluid Geometry Organic Shapes with Subtle Movement
  67. 67. 8. Revenge of the Mouse Creative Cursor Effects
  68. 68. 9. Black Darker Palettes
  69. 69. 10. Rebellious Design Brutalism, Neon, Unexpected Typography, Anti-Design
  70. 70. How to Think about These “Trends” • These are inspirations, not prescriptions. • Don’t let the specific aesthetics of these examples distract you. • If you want to experiment, think about focused campaigns.
  71. 71. Thank you!

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