5 Questions to Ask before you Start Conversion Optimization

181 views

Published on

Conversion optimization is a science in and of itself, but when it comes to getting started with building your own strategy, it needs to begin with a series of questions – the answers to which are found through their own research and experiments, sort of like doing pre-optimization optimization.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
181
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

5 Questions to Ask before you Start Conversion Optimization

  1. 1. Conversion optimization is a science in and of itself, but when it comes to getting started with building your own strategy, it needs to begin with a series of questions – the answers to which are found through their own research and experiments, sort of like doing pre-optimization optimization. Unfortunately, too many site owners start jumping into A/B testing before even taking a look at these foundational pieces of information. If you’re contemplating changing something about your site to enhance conversions, begin the process by first asking yourself the following questions: ) ’ This is one of the most neglected areas of conversion optimization strategy, simply because most site owners don’t put the data they’re seeing into context. Instead, they just know that things aren’t ideal and they want to fix them. Like a doctor, you need to do an examination before you can start thinking of what tests to recommend or a diagnosis. Before doing anything, have a concrete idea of what the current state of the site in both a holistic sense and the specific areas you want to optimize. For example, if you’re an ecommerce site and you’ve seen an increase in traffic but not an increase in conversions, you’ll want to first get a general idea of the trends and patterns you’re seeing with the site overall in terms of traffic and user behavior, and then, start diving deeper into your top landing pages and
  2. 2. traffic sources to start to form hypotheses about why your traffic isn’t converting as well. From there, you’ll do A/B testing or maybe you’ll find that there’s a more obvious site issue causing a problem, such as a price that was incorrectly entered and is too high or a broken checkout button. ) Armed with your general site data, you’ll next want to form a better understanding of who exactly your visitors are. Information like what browsers they use, what languages they speak, what country they come from, what interests they have, what they value in a product, or whether or not they are male or female is essential to forming your conversion optimization strategy. Get this information through customer surveys, polls, social media interaction, or tools like Google Analytics. Once in hand, you can test things based on specific visitor segments or form correlations in the data or observe patterns. The key is to establish a baseline and have an understanding of those who will be involved in your experimentation. Like any scientist, you have to know the participants of the study by some criteria. ) Where your visitors come from also has a lot to do with how they interact with your site, so really dig into your marketing and analytics to get a sense of what channels are driving traffic, how much, and what patterns there seem to be with those streams. Sometimes, you may find an opportunity for a new channel to test or a chance to reoptimize a channel that isn’t working as well as it used to. ) Seeing data that shows that there might be something wrong with a particular page is one thing, but redoing every element on that page isn’t always the best answer. There are many elements to a landing page (or even an entire site design) that can play into conversion optimization. Headers, subheaders, calls to action, footers, product images, the size of buttons for purchase, the length of a contact form…these are just a few of the things that you can explore with A/B testing. Choose one or two elements and start there. Don’t think that you have to change everything to see results – sometimes one thing can make all the difference.
  3. 3. ) Here’s the kicker. Conversion optimization can only work when you use the data and observations you’ve gained to make actionable decisions about your site. Decide early on in the process what your criteria will be for measurement, as well as the tools you’ll use to collect and analyze that data, but be flexible. As with all great experiments, you may find that one way of measurement might not work, so be open to exploring other possibilities. Depending on your goals for conversion optimization, you may look at using multiple methods of testing, analytics, or tracking. Collect as much data as possible and from there, start to look at correlations. With these questions answered, you’ll have a good foundation to start building your conversion optimization plan on. Speaking of plans, there are plenty of resources out there with solid tips that can help you as you start to build your strategy. Here’s some recommended reading:  Top 20 Conversion Optimization Tips [Search Engine Watch]  31 Conversion Optimization Tips [Wider Funnel Marketing Optimization]  Conversion Optimization Notes from the Interactivity Digital Conference [Three Deep Marketing]  10 Important Conversion Optimization Tips That Make Your Site Bad@$$ [Search Engine Journal]  The Conversion Optimization Rulebook [Unbounce] Have something else you think should be included in this list of questions to ask before getting started? Leave a comment!

×