Consulting project for Seppälä

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Consulting project for Seppälä

  1. 1. Hult International Business School<br />MDM 2010-2011<br />Module A<br />Courses:<br />Digital Market Optimization<br />Attracting Profitable Customers<br />3886200147320Date: 09.01.2011Assignment: Final AssignmentProf. Mike Berry Student: Olli Lainto00Date: 09.01.2011Assignment: Final AssignmentProf. Mike Berry Student: Olli Lainto<br />0-221615Table of ContentTable of Content<br />1. Overview of Seppälä……..……………………………………………………..…………..4<br />2. Current digital marketing activity………………………………………………...………5<br />2.1 Facebook ……………………………………………………………......………….5<br />2.2 Homepage…………………………………………………………….…….……….6<br />3. SEO……………………………………………………………………………….….…………7<br />3.1 SEO goals………………………………………………………………….………...8<br />4. Online display and PPC………………………………………….………………….………9<br />5. Social Media Strategy……………………………………………….………………………9<br />5.1 Facebook………………………………………………………………...….………10<br />5.2 Twitter……………………………………………….……………………………....11<br />6. Mobile strategy……………………………………………….………………….………….13<br />7. KPIs…………………………………………….………………………………………….…..15<br />8. Conclusion……………………………………………….……………………..……………17<br />Refrences…………………………………………………………………..……………………18<br />Appendixes…………………………………………….…………………….…………………20<br />Tasti-D Lite…………………………………….………………………………………..20<br />060325Executive SummaryExecutive Summary<br />Seppälä, founded in the beginning of 1930s, sells international fashion clothes and accessories to women, men and children. The company operates in Finland, Russia and Eastern Europe. The mission the company is to sell fashionable clothes at affordable prices to people who understand that fashion is not the most serious thing in the world. The company has become famous with their campaigns involving real people instead of professional models (Seppälä, 2010). Their current online marketing efforts are limited to the use of their homepage and Facebook. <br />To acquire new customer and use online marketing efforts more efficiently and purposefully, Seppälä will launch a new promotional campaign, which will significantly re-enforce the brand image of Seppälä and change their one-way approach to social media. The goals of the campaign and overall strategy change are to increase sales, increase brand awareness and increase the number of Seppälä Club members. <br />The campaign will utilize Facebook, the company’s website, Foursquare and Twitter to regenerate Seppälä’s entire long-term approach to social media. The company will ask photographers and Seppälä clothing owners to participate in demonstrating the genuine “Seppälä Look”. Best photos will be uploaded to a website where everyone will be able to comment on the photos, exchange ideas and get tips on how they could complete their own Seppälä Looks. <br />In addition to the different social medias, Seppälä will set up a search engine optimization plan, which will be a long-term strategy. The plan will include on-page optimization, keywords and social media optimization with specific SEO goals. Seppälä will also take advantage PPC and online display advertising in the launch of the new campaign because they provide a very effective combination of promotion, to go alongside the SEO plan. Online display ads will be placed on high traffic sites with users that match the key target audience of Seppälä. <br />Finally, Seppälä will begin using the mobile phone application Foursquare as a tool to attract more customers and build brand loyalty. Foursquare will be used in a similar way that has been done by fashion retailers such H&M and Marc Jacobs. People who check-in” into Seppälä stores, can then get special discounts or be eligible to purchase limited edition clothing. Seppälä Club members will be able to add Foursquare and optionally Twitter to their membership. This will automatically give them bonus points and also update their Twitter / Facebook and Foursquare accounts each time the Seppälä Club card is swiped. <br />In order for Seppälä to stay on top of the change their new online approach will have, the company will be formulating, following up on and revising relative KPIs according to the REAN framework (Reach, Engagement, Action and Nurture). Benchmarking will be used to compare the company’s own improvement and to compare the company’s results against other competitors in the industry.<br />0-2216151. Overview of Seppälä1. Overview of Seppälä<br />Seppälä sells international fashion clothes and accessories to women, men and children. The company operates and is expanding in Finland, Russia and Eastern Europe as a part of the Stockmann concern. The mission of the company is to sell fashionable clothes at affordable prices to people who understand that fashion is not the most serious thing in the world and who can relate to fashion with a “tongue in cheek” (Seppälä, 2010).<br />The company’s promotional campaigns are known for their humoristic approach and for conveying an image of feeling good and having fun. The idea is not to look “cool” or “snobbish” like the fashion models strutting down runways in Paris and Milan, but to look good in normal, everyday life situations. These ideas are key to the designs offered in their stores where they have large selections of clothes starting from small kids up to adults in their late 50’s (Seppälä, 2010).<br />41148002750185<br />The company was founded in the early 1930’s when the brothers Seppälä opened their first clothing store in Southern Finland at the town of Kymintehtaa. Despite the harsh times and being situated far from the fashion trends of Paris and Milan, the store became quickly well known for its large collection of fashionable clothes, sold at reasonable prices (Seppälä, 2010). <br />In 1951 the company expanded by opening their second store in Kouvola and maintained a steady expansion pace throughout Finland in the 60s and 70s. In 1984 they opened their first store abroad in Berlin and inspired by its success focused their expansion towards the new and growing markets in Eastern Europe at the beginning of 90s. They also began expanding on their product categories firstly on to underwear and cosmetics and later on to footwear and handbags, the idea being that they would offer people a complete range of Seppälä products (Seppälä, 2010).<br />By the end of the 90s the company had 13 stores in Estonia and was expanding to Latvia and Lithuania. At the beginning of the millennium the company also expanded to Russia opening up several stores there and having over 66 stores altogether (Seppälä, 2010).<br />The company has become famous with their campaigns involving real people. “Be the supermodel of your own life” – campaign featured normal people (not professional models), chosen amongst the people who shopped at Seppälä stores (Seppälä, 2010). The people chosen were dressed up in Seppälä clothing and photographed for posters displayed at the stores, on billboards and on the Internet. The posters displayed the chosen people next to the slogan “Be the supermodel of your own life”, and with their name, age and profession. The initial campaign has become a yearly thing at Seppäl and has been followed with a campaign “Be the fashion designer of your life”, allowing people to design their own clothes and if picked winner will become an actual fashion line at Seppälä stores. <br />0-2216152. Current digital marketing activity02. Current digital marketing activity<br />Seppälä’s current digital marketing activity is limited to the use of their website and Facebook page. The company doesn’t have a Twitter or LinkedIn account, company blog nor do they use RSS or mobile phone applications. <br />0692152.1 Facebook02.1 Facebook<br />Seppälä’s Facebook page’s role is to promote the campaigns, inform people of upcoming discount sales and get people to sign up for the “Seppälä Club”.The Facebook page has just over 46,000 fans and is written completely in Finnish, giving the assumption that the vast majority of the fans are Finnish nationalities as well. The company has updated their wall posts almost on daily basis in December and November and roughly ones or twice a week before that. The posts consist of special offers in various Seppälä stores, of special offers to the “Seppälä club” members and of contests and of different polls. The fan posts are to a large extent short posts praising Seppälä with few complaints and questions addressed to Seppälä but as far as can be told; no one from the company has answered or commented any to the fan posts. <br />The page has just under 150 pictures, which are organized more or less under certain campaign and contest folders, but in general they have been uploaded to the page without much thought on how they should be organized. Most of the pictures don’t have any titles or information, so they don’t have much value for the viewer. The language and feeling of the page is quite relaxed and nonchalant which is in line with the entire Seppälä Company’s image and of their marketing campaigns. <br />The main reason of the Facebook page seems to be to get people to sign up for the “Seppälä Club”, which gives people monthly discounts on products, access to events that Seppälä is a part of or is organizing, and also gives them various exclusively offers. Some of the past offers have been personalized style information and the chance to reserve special campaign products. <br />Effectiveness for customer acquisition<br />The Facebook page does an adequate job on promoting Seppälä’s products and campaigns but lacks greatly on engaging the fans. The communication from the company’s side (although written in an informal and relaxed manner) is still only posts about products and promotions. The fans have no reason to write on the wall, as the whole page seems just like a big advertisement. <br />Other problem is that the page is entirely in Finnish. The promotions and competitions advertised and all the other content (pictures, videos and “Seppälä Club” information) are all in Finnish as well. Even though Finland represents the largest market for the company they shouldn’t neglect their shoppers around the world. The Facebook page could be easily translated even only into English and made available for managers in charge of different European markets. <br />0-2216152.2 Seppälä’s homepage002.2 Seppälä’s homepage<br />The company’s homepage is partly very professionally done but on the other hand has some amateur level problems, like broken links. The site is very heavy and takes long time load. The company does not sell their products online. <br />The site has a very minimalistic look with few pages that contain very little written information. The product pages have few nice pictures of some of the latest products but overall the selection available for online viewing is very small. Women have 8 mannequin ensembles to choose from and men and children three each. <br />The site doesn’t have a blog and the only personal contact that can be made with the company is on the page “Designers” where they have compiled a list of their 20 designers with short introductions. The site promotes their current big campaigns “Be the supermodel of your own life” and “Be the fashion designer of your own life” heavily and they’re pages are done adequately.<br />On the “Be the supermodel of your own life” site people have a chance to upload their own images with the hopes of becoming a Seppälä model. The service is also advertised as a great way to get feedback from the company’s stylist on makeup, hair and clothing. The idea is good but the execution lacks of company involvement and engagement with the aspiring models. The stylist had commented only on two pictures and the page doesn’t allow users to comment or engage the company in any other way than by uploading pictures. <br />“Be the fashion designer of your own life,” allows users to create their own ensembles from the Seppälä’s existing collection and combine them with a “moodboard” which is a collage of pictures, items and text that is meant to convey the feeling of the ensemble. The users with the best “moodboards” can win gift cards to Seppälä and have their design sold in all Seppälä stores at the end of 2011. The company has had several different variations of this idea, where users get to design their own products and have them become part of the Seppälä selection. The idea is good and the creation of your own designs is easy but again the site has no interaction or follow-up engagement. After you’ve submitted your design the only thing you can do is vote for other users ensembles. Users don’t get feedback from the company stylists nor can they discuss about the competition or designing anywhere on the site. <br />The company has used these two main campaigns, and their variations, for years but the lack engagement is working against them. They want to excite people about designing clothes and modeling, but the tools they’ve created only allow users to interact with the company once. The only user information given during the signup for the two competitions are the name, basic contact information and gender of the user. These competitions are only for Finnish nationalities and the website has very little to offer when viewed on another languages. Even the content on English only covers some of the basic things of the website.<br />069853. SEO for Seppälä03. SEO for Seppälä<br />In order for Seppälä to expand their business and increase awareness of the company, they need to set up a search engine optimization plan, which will be a long-term strategy. The plan presented here gives a general outline into the basic steps required for the successful optimization of the Seppälä’s website and their ranking in search engines. The team assessing SEO will require both a server-log file based solution and a browser-based solution for complete analysis of SEO effectiveness. The strategy will also require a long-term cost / benefit analysis, so that the correct amount of investment can be optimized (Econsultancy, 2009). The objective will be to have Seppälä appearing highly ranked on the natural listings of the first page of Google, when certain keywords are searched for. <br />On-page optimization<br />On-page content should be optimized by modifying the website into a more search engine friendly format, so that it appears higher in the rankings. This will include defining optimal keywords that match the searched key words, which will also go along with the new campaign proposed. Headline and link text should reflect the editorial content and there will be different levels of target keyphrases for each page, such as primary, secondary and tertiary. (Econsultancy, 2009). <br />Keywords<br />The relevance of the keywords, SEO and the Seppälä Look campaign go hand-in-hand as the content published and uploaded to the website will have direct impact on the relevancy of the searches and hence in the ranking. The documents uploaded to the site need to be modified so that the keyword density stays high. Documents having to do with a specific topic, for example the competition or latest summer trends of 2011 will have a target keyphrase density of 5-10%. To maximize the keyword density the length of the articles should be kept short. Previews of 200-400 word articles will work as a good entry method to the full-length articles. Finally keyword synonyms are another way for Seppälä to increase the ranking of their sites and content. The synonyms will be included within the page copy, in Meta descriptions and within title tags if possible (Econsultancy, 2009). <br />Social media and SEO<br />Inbound links are one of the most important factors in search engine rankings as for most of the search engines consider them as “votes of confidence”, and the more a site has them, the higher it appears in listings. Millions of links are shared every day on Facebook, Twitter, MySpace and blogs. As more people share a link to a website, the ranking of the webpage will increase.  SEO’s impact on social media can also be seen, when a link is easier to find on a search engine, then people are more likely to share it. Social media and SEO are complimentary forces and Seppälä should utilize this in their campaigns.<br />-22860069853.1 SEO goals3.1 SEO goals<br />-22479001995805Outcome-based goal:This is set up to measure the Seppälä Club registrations. A goal for this objective could be to achieve 50 registrations from SEO or PPC per month.0Outcome-based goal:This is set up to measure the Seppälä Club registrations. A goal for this objective could be to achieve 50 registrations from SEO or PPC per month.The SEO plan objectives should be clearly set in the beginning of the project and the success measured so that the plan can be revised if necessary (Econsultancy, 2009). Following goals are examples of what kind of targets Seppälä could set for themselves and what they should be measuring (Econsultancy, 2009) <br />2286003405505Market share-based goal: This is aimed to measure the “share of search” within a service category relative to Seppälä. The measurement can be done with such tools as Google Traffic Estimator or Hitwise. A specific goal for Seppälä could be to achieve 20% share of search within 12 months for a particular key phrase.Market share-based goal: This is aimed to measure the “share of search” within a service category relative to Seppälä. The measurement can be done with such tools as Google Traffic Estimator or Hitwise. A specific goal for Seppälä could be to achieve 20% share of search within 12 months for a particular key phrase.2286002087245Visitor volume-based: This goal is especially good from the awareness and brand building point of view as Seppälä can set it up to measure the amount of people visiting and interacting on the site. The goal could be to achieve 5,000 clicks across agreed phrases per month.0Visitor volume-based: This goal is especially good from the awareness and brand building point of view as Seppälä can set it up to measure the amount of people visiting and interacting on the site. The goal could be to achieve 5,000 clicks across agreed phrases per month.22860083185Position-based goal:An example goal for Seppälä could be to achieve 100 top ten positions, 5,000 top 50 positions, or preferably, more specific goals for specific phrases in the Finnish market.0Position-based goal:An example goal for Seppälä could be to achieve 100 top ten positions, 5,000 top 50 positions, or preferably, more specific goals for specific phrases in the Finnish market.<br />-55664102486660Value-based goal: This goal defines the entire profit contribution gained from the SEO plan. A goal for Seppälä could be to generate £5,000 profit from SEO in Quarter 1. 0Value-based goal: This goal defines the entire profit contribution gained from the SEO plan. A goal for Seppälä could be to generate £5,000 profit from SEO in Quarter 1. -55664101343660Cost-based goal:With this goal Seppälä can incorporate costs into their other objectives through specifying limits on for example Cost Per Click or Cost Per Sale. A specific Goal could be to set up Cost per Click to be less than €X for a click. 0Cost-based goal:With this goal Seppälä can incorporate costs into their other objectives through specifying limits on for example Cost Per Click or Cost Per Sale. A specific Goal could be to set up Cost per Click to be less than €X for a click. <br />01384304. Online Display and PPC4. Online Display and PPC<br />Seppälä could take advantage PPC and online display advertising in the launch of the new campaign because they provide a very effective combination of promotion to go alongside the SEO plan. Online display ads should be placed on high traffic sites with users that match the key target audience of Seppälä. Facebook’s importance in the online display advertising market has increased drastically over the past years and Seppälä’s strategy should be to utilize all relevant sites at the launch of their campaign (Cheap gift, 2010). Other sites Seppälä should target are for example like Kuvake.net and IRC-Galleria.net, which are Finnish versions of Facebook. <br />0635004.1 PPC4.1 PPC<br />Because PPC ads are based on keywords it allows Seppälä to target highly specific target audiences. The benefit of using PPC is that Seppälä doesn’t have to pay for the ad space but only when the ad is actually clicked. Putting the ads to high traffic sites means that a large number of people will see the ad even if they don’t click on it, which means that they improve Seppäläs brand awareness.<br />Measuring the success of the PPCs starts with the basics of setting up target keywords and establishing budget parameters but the most important one to measure is the conversio. In Seppäläs case to goal is to have people sign up for the Seppälä Club and participate in the Seppälä Look campaign. The plan with PPC as with the SEO is that it’s a long-term plan since Seppälä will need time to find out which keywords are working and which are not. Eventually the idea is to spend more on the best CPA keywords and get rid of the ones that don’t work. The whole process is constantly evolving and so are the goals. It starts with getting enough qualified traffic and after tracking conversions the company can began optimizing CPA (PPC Journal, 2010).<br />01454155. Social media strategy05. Social media strategy<br />Seppälä’s overall strategy has been to provide people almost a service, where they offer people a complete look from shoes to clothes and accessories. The approach has been that fashion is not the most serious thing in the world. It is something that should be enjoyable in all kinds of situations, whether it’s just at home or when a person is off shopping or at work. <br />These core ideas that the company was founded on, will be combined together to create a new promotional campaign, which will significantly re-enforce the brand image of Seppälä and change their one-way approach to social media. The goals of the campaign and overall strategy change are to increase sales, increase brand awareness and increase the number of Seppälä Club members. <br />In order to justify the new campaign Seppälä needs to begin measuring ROI early on. They need to establish a baseline for sales and social media interaction before the launch of the campaign and follow it with an activity timeline showing the different stages of the campaign so that the causality can be measured. Seppälä should also see what kind of an impact the campaign and strategy change has on the number of transactions, on the number of new customers and on the number of people following them at social medias. Once they’ve overlaid their own activities against social data, web data, transactions and loyalty metrics they can start looking for patterns to see what is working and what’s not (Warren, 2010). <br />“The Seppälä Look”-campaign<br />To continue on the line of promotional campaigns the company has become famous for, the Seppälä Look campaign will encourage people to create their own “Seppälä looks”. The idea is that people can upload pictures of themselves displaying what the “Seppälä look” is for them whether it is at home, on the town or at the work.<br />The campaign will utilize Facebook, the company’s website, Foursquare and Twitter to regenerate Seppälä’s entire long-term approach to social media. The company invites photographers and Seppälä clothing owners to participate and will then add the best of the submitted photos the site where users can then comment on and share photos.<br />The campaign takes the “Be the supermodel of your own life” further by inviting ordinary people to pose as models and be shot by amateurs. Burberry did a similar campaign last year when they launched the “Art of the Trench” campaign, inviting people to submit photos of themselves wearing Burberry trench coats.<br />Once the campaign and the whole strategy towards online marketing have been proven successful, the company can move on to different methods of promoting the Seppälä Look idea. Some of the ways it can do it is by adding Seppälä Look clothing items into online games in the same way H&M has done in MyTown, where they offer virtual versions of their clothes. “H&M provides virtual versions of their products to players of MyTown in an effort to incentivize players who are near H&M by giving them special “Blue” clothing items as they approach the store” (Keath, 2010). Other way Seppälä could continue with the campaign would be to enable people to see what the Seppälä Look can be for them. Fits.Me is a virtual fitting room robot that enables people to see what the clothes they would like to purchase, actually look like on them. It was developed as a selling tool for online clothing retailers but could also be used as a part of a campaign tool. People could submit a face picture of themselves, choose a theme (casual, work, night out) and select the clothes they wish to try on, and actually see how they would look like. Something like this would be never before done in the online fashion world and would go greatly together with Seppälä’s new, strong online presence and engagement. <br />0831855.1 Facebook005.1 Facebook<br />Launch issues<br />The Facebook page now used by the company is not a terrible one, and with minor re-organizing it can be a very good one. The new strategy will come along with a new approach to Facebook, which means that it will not be used purely as a one-way broadcast medium. <br />The approach will be to share useful information for the fans. The information won’t be only about the company, but about anything that could be interesting and useful for the fans. At the start of the Seppälä Look campaign the posts will be more related to completing the “Seppälä Look” by posting information on makeup tips, latest hairstyle trends and how people can protect themselves from the cold or the heat. After the campaign has finished, the use of Facebook will follow the same course with more broader topics and news (Van Grove, 2009).<br />What to strive for<br /> HYPERLINK "http://howies.co.uk/" t "_blank" Howies is a UK clothing company specializing in active wear. Their Facebook page is very social and packed full of interesting content. Howies has succeeded in giving their brand a real personal approach by making sure visitors get to know the individuals within the company. They’re also clearly communicating expertise in their area, by joining niche social networks such as  HYPERLINK "http://rumplo.com/tags/howies" t "_blank" Rumplo, where members share artistic t-shirts from around the web. Their wall is being updated more frequently and their fans are more active in posting questions and comments than Seppälä’s, even though Howies has only little over 4000 fans compared to Seppälä’s 46,000. Howies is also actively helping their customers through Facebook, for example over the Christmas holiday sales they answered peoples questions about specific clothing items and where they could still find them within an hour or so of the question (Fisher, 2010). <br />Promotion<br />Promoting the Facebook page and getting people excited about the new approach will require online and traditional offline promotion. As the “new” Facebook page is launched alongside with the Seppälä Look campaign, it’ll be easy to include Facebook promotions to the TV-commercials and billboards. The offline promotions will encourage people to visit the Seppälä Facebook page and become a fan to receive exclusive information. The promotions will also offer a change to win Seppälä gift cards if the user becomes a fan via text message. This will have a more powerful engagement effect instead of simply promoting the URL of the Seppälä’s Facebook page. <br />Online promotion will focus on relative pages to the campaign such as the sites of influential fashion bloggers and local Finnish social media sites, like Kuvake.net and IRC-Galleria.net, which have been established even before Facebook. Both of these services operate more or less in the same way as Facebook, and even though they both have only about 500,000 users, the vast majority of users consist of teenagers and young adults.<br />0984255.2 Twitter05.2 Twitter<br />Launch issues<br />Twitter isn’t as popular in Finland, Russia or Eastern Europe as in Western Europe or the US, but nevertheless the company should be present on it. Even though the company is neglecting this medium, their fans aren’t. A quick search in Twitter reveals that the company has a number of fans on Twitter tweeting about special discounts or campaigning for their “Be the fashion designer of your own life” ensembles. <br />Because the campaign will be first launched only in Finland, the company tweets can be only in Finnish. As with Facebook, Twitter shouldn’t be used as a purely broadcast medium. Seppälä needs to listen and interact with their audience as well as simply posting. The simple idea is to talk with people and come across as genuinely sincere. Seppälä’s person in charge of social media can take charge this, experimenting on what is the best approach. <br />Seppälä should have a branded profile for the more general posts dealing with the promotional stuff, as well as commenting on the “hot topics” of the day. The main target markets of Seppälä (teenagers and young adults) are also going to be able to follow-up on Seppälä’s designers. Seppälä’s open and engaging design policy is well known especially in Finland and having open lines of communication to the designers through Twitter would gather a large follow-up benefiting Seppälä’s brand and dominance among Finnish Twitter users (Ostrow, 2009). <br />Seppälä’s Twitter identity<br />In order to do this Seppälä needs to build credibility and “Twitter equity”, which doesn’t just mean gathering a large number of followers, tweets or re-tweets (Catone, 2010). Rather, it’s about developing a reputation as a trusted source of information and being seen as an expert of the relaxed view to fashion (Van Grove, 2009). Seppälä’s approach to Twitter needs to be engaging, they need to ask questions and comment topics that aren’t only about their company, but that have something to do with the whole industry or about things that might be of interest to their followers. Seppälä should share news that are affecting the company that are non promotional but allow followers to feel closer to the company. For example they might tweet about hiring a new designer. <br />For the branded profile Seppälä should follow the 80/20 rule of having majority of their tweets of personal and conversational nature and only a small number of actual company promotions. This ratio has been found beneficial in building customer engagement and link click-through rates. Seppälä should also use hashtags with their campaigns to get people involved and promote them on Facebook, on the company blog and on emails. The use of hastags should however be limited to specific use and not abused for spamming purposes (Catone, 2010). <br />The Twitter account will be launched alongside the “Seppälä Look”- campaign but the use of Twitter will be a long-term strategy, continuing on after the initial launch campaign has ended. Building an active follower community will take time and Seppälä needs to listen and observe what people are saying about the company. Rather than forcing their ideas and topics, even if they are great ones, won’t work if people are not willing to listen or don’t trust the company. Seppälä needs to be authentic and believable in the eyes of the consumers. The idea of using Twitter is to have a personal contact to the consumers and because of this, using it shouldn’t in the long run require much thought. Having a conversation with a stranger in a coffee shop doesn’t require a strategy and so it shouldn’t in Twitter. Different ways Seppälä can utilize Twitter besides the traditional tweeting could be that they have company representatives tweet from fashion shows or better yet, have a contest winner or an influential blogger flown to Milan or Paris and have them tweet throughout the event. <br />Tracking metrics and KPIs<br />In accordance with the new approach to social media, Seppälä should also set up different tracking metrics to track Twitter conversations, identify trends and get a quantifiable picture of what is going on in the social web. Seppäläs goals for Twitter should be achievable and measurable. As the popularity of Twitter is still low in Finland, they should start of with modes expectations. As with the entire strategy change, Seppälä should define a baseline for the Twitter activity at the start of the launch (Van Grove, 2010).<br />Some of the Twitter goals Seppälä should measure are Twitter giveaways, hashtag campaigns, link sharing, retweets, referrers, total followers, and tweets per day, week, or month (Catone, 2010).<br />In addition to the more traditional metrics that can be acquired using services like Radian6 or Nielsen, Seppälä should track how much money they have saved using and tracking Twitter i.e. what kind of things have they learned, how many issues were they able to solve and how many leads and tips were they able to pull out of Twitter (Warren, 2010).<br />0139706. Mobile strategy6. Mobile strategy<br />To further push the engagement aspect of the new campaign and entire marketing strategy change into the minds of the consumers, Seppälä will begin using the mobile phone application Foursquare as tool to attract more customers and build brand loyalty. Seppälä’s widespread range of stores covers all the bigger cities and towns in Finland and the biggest cities have several Seppälä stores. This enables them to have an extensive coverage for the service. Foursquare will be used for promotional purposes, for special offers and it will combined with the Seppälä Club customer loyalty program.<br />How Foursquare will be used<br />Seppälä will be using Foursquare in a similar way that has been done by fashion retailers such H&M and Marc Jacobs (Keath, 2010). The idea is to get people to “check-in” into Seppälä stores around Finland. People who do this can then get special discounts or be eligible to purchase limited edition clothing. Other method how Foursquare can be used is the “First to Check-in Specials”; if it is the first time the person is visiting the store they will again be eligible to get a discount or a special clothing item (Lacy, 2010). <br />Finally Foursquare can be used alongside special campaigns to create “buzz” and get people excited. Using the feature called Forsquare badges, which are special awards earned by completing a certain task, will enable fans of Seppälä to complete different tasks. Marc Jacobs and Foursquare created the “Fashion Victim” badge, which allowed Fashion Week attendees and others to “check-in” at any “Marc by Marc Jacobs” store in New York and around the country to unlock the badge. Four people who unlocked the badge in New York were randomly chosen to receive tickets to the Marc Jacobs show. This collaboration provided both Marc Jacobs and Foursquare with word of mouth marketing (Samimi, 2010). One of the winners was style blogger Elaine Ellis who had been in New York for the weekend. Afterwards she praised the experience in her blog, “Marc Jacobs made my dreams come true; there will never be a better day in my life!” (Samimi, 2010).<br />Foursquare and Seppälä Club<br />Seppälä Club members will be able to add Foursquare and optionally Twitter and Facebook to their membership. Each time the member makes a purchase at one of the Seppälä stores they will earn loyalty points in the same manner they have before, but those that opt in to the social media bonuses, will automatically earn additional points. They’ll also have their Twitter accounts updated each time the card is swiped and points are earned or redeemed.<br />Other ways Seppälä can sync their loyalty rewards program to Foursquare is by offering a branded Foursquare badge, additional points, freebies and member perks for being a frequent shopper (Martell, 2010). By syncing the loyalty program with Foursquare, Seppälä will enable frequent shoppers to share their recent purchases with their communities. When a user posts shopping tips or deals at a particular location, that post is essentially an advertising impression on Foursquare, Twitter (Chioevanu, 2010).<br />This type of campaign has been done very successfully by Tasti D-Lite, which launched the service in early 2010. The frozen desert franchise was the first in their field to start using social media for this kind of marketing. The campaign has been praised for the connection between customers’ social media behavior and their in-store behavior. The “autotweet” (see Appendix 1) feature has received mixed reviews but Seppälä could allow the members of the Seppälä club to customize the automatic tweet into a more personal format (Van Grove, 2010).<br />How it will be measured<br />The Foursquare business dashboard allows businesses to track and analyze the activity of the users at their establishments. The software will allow Seppälä to collect data on total check-ins, unique visitors and repeat customers, allowing them to measure the effectiveness of the campaign their running at the time. The software can also make the distinction between male and female shoppers by their account information when they check in at Seppälä. The top customers (mayors) and few runner-ups can also be easily found using this tool and will enable Seppälä to reward them with a special offer or a discount (Keath, 2010). <br /> <br />The software will also show Seppälä which of their customers published Foursquare check-ins and comments to other social networking sites, such as Twitter and Facebook. By tracking this data, Seppälä can get a better understanding of the ripple effect their usage of Foursquare has on other social medias (Warren, 2010).<br />Statistics to measure:Most recent visitorsMost frequent visitorsThe time of day people check inTotal number of unique visitorsHistogram of check-ins per dayGender breakdown of customers<br />01092207. KPIs7. KPIs<br />In order for Seppälä to stay on top of the change their new online approach will have, the company will be formulating, following up on and revising relative KPIs according to the REAN framework (Reach, Engagement, Action and Nurture). Benchmarking will be used to compare the company’s own improvement and to compare the company’s results against other competitors in the industry. Seppälä will nee to set up clear targets for improving each selected metric over a period of time (Chaffey, 2010). <br />REAN Framework:<br />REACH# Of Organic Keywords Found# Of Linking Domains# Of Pages Indexed# Of Branded Searches# Of Blog Subscribers# Of Twitter Followers# Of Facebook Fans# %Site visits / %SEM visits / % Display ads <br /># Of Organic Keywords Found<br />Majority of keywords used to find websites are usually the ones that weren’t optimized, these are known as the “long tail” and it is the reason why Seppälä will need to improve on the textual content of their website so that it can be indexed by search engines. Another benefit of the long tail is that the searches related to it are usually highly targeted and have better conversion rates. Seppälä should try to have the number of individual keywords they’re being found with rising consistently, meaning that the site is becoming rich of content. <br /># Of Linking Domains<br />Number of links to the website are important when it comes to SEO but a better indicator of popularity are unique domains linking to Seppälä’s site.<br /># Of Pages Indexed<br />Number of indexed pages is also something that Seppälä should be paying attention to. Currently they have 15 indexed pages, which isn’t a lot (GTmetrix). The more content they would have indexed would mean more of targeted long tail traffic. <br /># Of Branded Searches<br />As the purpose of Seppälä’s online presence is to create brand awareness that can be turned into offline sales, they need to measure their online presence. Branded searches can be used to measure the development in this area. <br /># Of Subscribers to different medias<br />Having a constant and steady increase in followers means Seppälä is establishing a better and larger connection to their customers and that the whole company’s approach is becoming more open and inviting. The increase in followers also means that Seppälä will be able to receive more information on what their customers want and how they can improve. <br />ENGAGEMENT # Alerts (register and response rates / by channel / CTR / post click activity)# Comments (Social Media, Website, Blog)# Forward to a friend (Campaing news, Competition, Foursquare)# Uploads (add an item, e.g. articles, links, images, videos to Facebook, Company blog, Twitter)Time spent on site (by source / by entry page) Time spent on key pages (Competition pages / Seppälä Look page)Social media sharing / participation (activity on key social media sites, e.g. Facebook, Twitter, Digg, etc)# Registered users (new / total / active / dormant / churn)<br />KPIs selected for the engagement part are mainly intended for the content on the main website but can also be used for the other online medium that Seppälä is using. <br />ACTIVATIONConversion rates of:# Of Seppälä Club members# Participation in the competitions or Sepplä Look campaign# People signing up to use Foursquare# Fans (Facebook, Twitter, Blog, Competitions and Seppälä Look)CPA for all the above<br />KPIs selected for the activation part are specific conversion points that Seppälä is looking to achieve. Cost per action will be used to measure the success getting people to sign up for the Seppälä club, adding Foursquare to their Seppälä club membership and participation on the competitions and on the Seppälä Look campaign<br />NURTURING# Repeat visits / logins and their frequencyCommunity engagement (how actively people are responding to news and comments from Seppälä, how well Seppälä can get people engaged and active when new content is released)% Of Email permission coverage% Of Email engagement (“hurdle rate”)Feedback (site surveys and content rating)<br />KPIs selected for the nurturing part are meant to measure how strong and loyal the communities around the various services are. It’s measured by looking into the frequency people visit certain sites and how actively they’re engaging with new content and what is the email engagement. <br />0355607. Conclusion 7. Conclusion <br />New approach to social media<br />To acquire new customer and use online marketing efforts more efficiently and purposefully, Seppälä will launch a new promotional campaign, which will significantly re-enforce the brand image of Seppälä and change their one-way approach to social media. The goals of the campaign and overall strategy change are to increase sales, increase brand awareness and increase the number of Seppälä Club members. The campaign will utilize Facebook, the company’s website, Foursquare and Twitter to regenerate Seppälä’s entire long-term approach to social media.<br />SEO<br />In addition to the different social medias, Seppälä will set up a search engine optimization plan, which will be a long-term strategy. The plan will include on-page optimization, keywords, social media optimization and specific SEO goals. Seppälä will also take advantage PPC and online display advertising in the launch of the new campaign because they provide a very effective combination of promotion to go alongside the SEO plan. Online display ads will be placed on high traffic sites with users that match the key target audience of Seppälä. <br />Foursquare<br />Seppälä will begin using the mobile phone application Foursquare as a tool to attract more customers and build brand loyalty. People who check-in” into Seppälä stores, can then get special discounts or be eligible to purchase limited edition clothing. Seppälä Club members will be able to add Forsquare and optionally Twitter to their membership. This will automatically give them bonus points and also update their Twitter accounts each time the Seppälä Club card is swiped.<br />Other ways Seppälä can sync their loyalty rewards program to Foursquare is by offering a branded badge, freebies and member perks for being a frequent shopper. By syncing the loyalty program with Foursquare, Seppälä will enable frequent shoppers to share their recent purchases with their communities. <br />Measuring success<br />REAN Framework will be used to measure all the different online mediums used and the overall online performance of the company. Setting up relevant KPIs for different phases of the online awareness and -follow-up acquisition will enable the company to set up correct KPIs to measure the results their looking for. Benchmarking will be used to compare the company’s own improvement and to compare the company’s results against other competitors in the industry.<br />0-2216158. Refrences 8. Refrences <br />Websites:<br />Catone, J. (2010). HOW TO: Use Twitter Hashtags for Business .Available: http://mashable.com/2009/09/04/twitter-hashtags-business/. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Chioevanu, A. (2010). How fashion industry could use Foursquare .Available: http://www.grupobetalabs.com/2010/05/how-fashion-industry-could-use-foursquare/. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Chaffey, D. (2010). E-marketing glossary. Available: http://www.davechaffey.com/E-marketing-Glossary/Hurdle-rate.htm. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Cheap gift. (2010). Facebook leads the market for online display advertising . Available: http://www.gift-cheap.com/facebook-leads-the-market-for-online-display-advertising/. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Econsultancy. (2009). SEO Best Practice Guide; Comprehensive advice for search marketers. Available: http://econsultancy.com/uk/reports/search-engine-optimization-seo-best-practice-guide. Last accessed 4th Dec 2010.<br />Fisher, L. (2010). 5 Small Businesses Successfully Using Social Media .Available: http://mashable.com/2009/10/21/social-media-small-businesses/. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Keath, J. (2010). 21 Unique Location Examples from Foursquare, Gowalla, Whrrl, and MyTown. Available: http://socialfresh.com/foursquare-case-studies/. Last accessed 7th Jan 201<br />Lacy, K. (2010). 20 Ways Businesses Are Using Foursquare . Available: http://kylelacy.com/20-ways-businesses-are-using-foursquare/. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Martell, D. (2010). How Businesses are Utilizing Foursquare. Available: http://www.flowtown.com/blog/how-businesses-are-utilizing-foursquare. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Ostrow, A. (2009). Social Media: What's Next?. Available: http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/technology/article/social-media-whats-next-adam-ostrow. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />PPC Journal. (2008). How To Measure PPC Ad Effectiveness Through Split Testing. Available: http://payperclickjournal.com/measure-ppc/01/14/2008/. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Samimi, A. (2010). H&M säljer erbjudanden i Foursquare. Available: http://www.dagensmedia.se/nyheter/kampanjer/article2488018.ece . Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Seppälä homepage. www.seppala.fi. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011. <br />Van Grove, J. (2009). 5 Mistakes to Never Make on Twitter. Available: http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/technology/article/5-mistakes-to-never-make-on-twitter-jennifer-van-grove. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Van Grove, J. (2009). 5 Secrets From Social Media Insiders. Available: http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/technology/article/5-secrets-from-social-media-insiders-jennifer-van-grove. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Van Grove, J. (2009). How to track your Twitter ROI. Available: http://www.openforum.com/idea-hub/topics/technology/article/how-to-track-your-twitter-roi-jennifer-van-grove. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Van Grove, J. (2010). Twitter and Foursquare Become the New Loyalty Program at Tasti D-Lite. Available: http://mashable.com/2010/01/13/tasti-d-lite-tastirewards/. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Warren, C. (2010). HOW TO: Measure Social Media ROI. Available: http://mashable.com/2009/10/27/social-media-roi/. Last accessed 7th Jan 2011.<br />Facebook: <br />http://www.facebook.com/howiescardigan?v=wall<br />http://www.facebook.com/seppala.fi<br />0151765AppendixesAppendixes<br />029845Appendix 1Appendix 1<br />lefttopExample of a “autotweet” from the Tasti-D Lite campaign<br />

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