Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Upcoming SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

0

Share

How to write a literary paper

Download to read offline

this is a presentation about how to write a literary paper

  • Be the first to like this

How to write a literary paper

  1. 1. How To Write a Literary Paper By: Juana Zufriategui, Luz Esteban and Olivia Obligado
  2. 2. PART 1
  3. 3. 1. Analyzing the Text and Developing a Thesis You will want to read the text at least once and careful notes to prepare for writing your essay. As you read: ● Think about what most interests you: imagery, characters, plot, pacing, tone, etc. Note examples. ● Consider the context. Is this text influenced by other texts? Does it use a style or form popular in a particular era? ● Reflect on what you know about the author. ● Focus on why certain elements are in the story and how they work. (Themes, tone, characters, etc) ● Decide what argument you think the text is making or what theme it is exploring.
  4. 4. 2. Choose a Topic A topic is the subject you will focus on. There are two types of essay, each with their own type of topic: 1. Expository essays give information to the reader. a. Your topic may be a single literary element of the work, such as character, plot, structure, theme, symbols, style, imagery, tone, etc. b. Illustration c. Draw parallels between the work and real-life subject matter such as historical events or the author's life.
  5. 5. The other way is... 2. Argumentative essays take a position on a debatable topic in order to change the reader's mind. ● Your topic can't be factual. ● And the argument can't be too easy to win ● It needs to be something people might reasonably disagree about
  6. 6. 3. Focus on your topic A good topic needs to be narrow enough that you can completely address it within the page limit. The key is to start broad and then narrow your focus. That argument will be your thesis. For example: ● Broad topic ● Add words that make it more specific ● Turn it into an even more specific sentence
  7. 7. 4. Develop a thesis The next step is to transform your topic into an argument! While your thesis will likely be revised as you write, it is still important to produce a preliminary thesis regarding the text, what it is trying to achieve, and the techniques the author uses to do so. A thesis will help you organize your ideas.
  8. 8. A piece of advice Be specific. For example: "The technique of allowing the reader the freedom to flesh out sparsely described images reinforces the theme of freedom versus destiny explored in the The Night Circus." This works better than something vague like: "The author uses rich visual imagery to great effect in The Night Circus."
  9. 9. 5. Gather more evidence to support your thesis ● Now that you have chosen a topic and preliminary thesis, you can focus your research. ● Reread the work or selected sections, looking for quotes that you can use to develop your argument. ● You will probably want to search for evidence in conjunction with the next step: outlining your essay.
  10. 10. Part 2: outlining your essay 1. Organize your ideas in an outline. It is always a good idea to write an outline. At a minimum, you'll want to include your thesis statement and a description of what each succeeding paragraph is about.
  11. 11. 2. Use your outline to help organize and guide your research ● If you write an outline early in the research process, you can use it to help focus on the specific areas you need to explore in more detail. ● This will save you time, by sparing you research into areas that won't figure in your paper.
  12. 12. 3. Flesh out your outline as you go 1. An outline can also provide "container" in which to put information. 2. Once you have an outline, you can start placing evidence and analysis into it as you come up with them to produce a more detailed outline that incorporates quotes and evidence for each paragraph, as in this sample outline.
  13. 13. PART 3- DRAFTING YOUR PAPER 1) Start with an introductory paragraph: ● title and author of the main works you deal with ● define the issues your essay will deal with. ● be specific 2) Summarize the text if necessary: ● give a short summary if you the reader is not familiarized with the text ● there must be more analysis than summary 3) Give an example of the topic you will be analyzing: ● you will want to begin with a representative example of the literary device you will analyze.
  14. 14. Part 3 4) Explore and support your thesis in the following paragraphs: ● provide evidence to support the claim as well as analysis of that evidence ( per paragraph) ● include warrant (explanation of how evidence supports thesis) ● backing (Additional reasoning) ● Counterclaims ( arguments that disagree with thesis) ● Rebuttal – Evidence and argumentation put forward by you that negates the counterclaim you introduced. 5) Conclude by moving beyond your thesis: ● consider what you want your readers to take away from your paper. ● a good conclusion will go on to discuss why it is important, to speculate on its broader implications
  15. 15. PART 4- MAKING USE OF MULTIPLE DRAFTS 1) Focus on the argument during your first draft ● save time by only focusing on arguments and on marshalling evidence to support that argument. 2) Do a second draft, focusing on the organization of your essay. ● Try using a reverse outline ● focus on smoothing out transitions between paragraphs- The end of one paragraph should logically lead to the start of the next. 3) Let someone else read your paper: ● They will be able to point out areas that are confusing or statements that are poorly supported. Use their feedback to write a third draft.
  16. 16. Part 5- editing your paper ● Print your paper so as to have it organized and be able to edit it from there. Make sure you read line by line to make sure you don’t make any grammar or spelling mistakes and if your prose is concise. ● Eliminate all words that you don't consider necessary like unnecessary prepositional phrases, adverbs, etc. Also make sure that you don't repeat many words and use alternatives ones. ● Make sure you don't repeat sentenced and if they are repeat tried to delete them, tried to rephrase them so as to not repeat the same things ● Remove all references to yourself as it is not reliable how you came to your conclusion because your thoughts are already clear throughout the paper ● Tried to read your paper out loud to yourself or to someone to make sure it doesn't have excessive use of commas or grammatical errors and finally run a spell check
  17. 17. Part 6 - overcoming writer's block ● Take your time to write, no matter if you write slow or more faster and make sure to start early and schedule plenty of time to write so as not to get nervous if you don't have time ● Don't pay attention to the number of work and pages. Instead, focus on putting in time and making a good work ● If you are writing in paper and you are stuck you can change the format and use a computer so as not to waste time ● If you don't know how to start writing your paper, take your time and on another documents start writing your ideas, thoughts, etc. (Free writing) ● Write in a detail outline form, don't worry about the language at first and focus more on plugging evidence and analysing it. ● Finally, you have to take a break while you write the paper so as not to get exhausted.

this is a presentation about how to write a literary paper

Views

Total views

175

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

91

Actions

Downloads

0

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×