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SEMO - Harnessing the power of seamless monitoring with IoT in Homecare - IoT Summit 2016

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Describing 12 challenges companies face which embark into IoT concluding from research findings in Germany 2015/16 by Oliver Neuland and Wolfgang Brunner. Resulting in a case study around seamless weigh monitoring in AAL conducted at AUT by Oliver Neuland, Farhaan Mirza and Jing Ma.

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SEMO - Harnessing the power of seamless monitoring with IoT in Homecare - IoT Summit 2016

  1. 1. Case study: Harness the power of seamless monitoring with IoT Farhaan Mirza Oliver Neuland Jing Ma
  2. 2. Area of Work / Projects Ambient Assisted Living - AAL Seamless Monitoring Medical Adherence Sports Technology
  3. 3. Seamless Monitoring Contexts Health Retail Logistics
  4. 4. Why Monitor 'All New Zealanders live well, stay well, get well, in a system that is people-powered, provides services closer to home, is designed for value and high performance, and works as one team in a smart system.'
  5. 5. Current Model of Health Care EPISODIC RELATIONSHIP Lacks Whānau / Family Involvement
  6. 6. Why Monitor
  7. 7. Decision Support
  8. 8. Big picture
  9. 9. Obser ve Theoris e Build Experime nt Design Science Methodology Our Approach
  10. 10. 3rd Party Triggers / API Local DB DB Monitoring Web Services Decision Support Web application 1 2 3 4 Bluetooth Interne t Hospital Applications & databases Interne t Wired 80kg 81kg 0Kg 0kg Wi- Fi Typical Monitoring Architecture
  11. 11. Smart furniture research in Germany Oliver Neuland
  12. 12. Seamless power distribution increasing issue for furniture industry Seamless power distribution seems an unsolved issue with further electrification of furniture. The industry faces new challenges to integrate electrical components into their production process and hide cables, actors and sensors. Batteries can be used, but access, maintenance or replacement can make a product less user friendly. //
  13. 13. Connected Home trend Tech demonstrator was needed to show functions!
  14. 14. Show homes & Studies Connectedlivinge.V.Berlin(TUBerlin)
  15. 15. Review of components and products
  16. 16. Scenario & Persona building
  17. 17. 12 Challenges of IoT Oliver Neuland & Dr, Farhaan Mirza
  18. 18. IoT seems more tech- than user focused Currently the market and research is more concerned with technology and functionality of solutions rather than user-centred, empathy driven interaction with users (or patients).
  19. 19. Geek space... “Buying a box to control your home automation setup is for wimps... Real hackers build their own systems.” Http://lifehacker.com
  20. 20. Still perceived as ‘geek’-products Real life problems need to be addressed Despite a vast amount of technology developed in IoT most of the applications are still perceived as “Geek”-products for early adaptors. Most accepted are: Home security, energy management, home entrainment & comfort. Enabling independent living (AAL) and home care are seen as useful applications.
  21. 21. Still perceived as ‘geek’-products Real life problems need to be addressed Despite a vast amount of technology developed in IoT most of the applications are still perceived as “Geek”-products for early adaptors. Most accepted are: Home security, energy management, home entrainment & comfort. Enabling independent living (AAL) and home care are seen as useful applications.
  22. 22. Many of the applications proposed and discussed in the press (visions like smart fridges, smart mirrors, remote control of house functions) are seen a less useful in real life application and perceived in some cases as ‘lazy’ options. Real advantage for the user are come through connectedness in a wider context. Just another remote control for the lazy?
  23. 23. Fast moving technology experienced as opportunity & risk IoT space moves fast this is a opportunity, but the development can also appear as a risky move at this stage for conventional manufacturers, No established standard protocol in the industry add to uncertainty. Left:RoostWifiBatteryMiddle:MicRespeakerVoicecontrollerRight:Knockitriggersachtionsby
  24. 24. Various competing protocols and systems scare potential new players to enter the market – many wait on the sidelines until market consolidation will become apparent/. However they see chances to get involved early to claim a stake in IoT or Connected Home products. Babylonian confusion of protocols scare companies to enter market
  25. 25. Stand-alone products serve fast paced market better Stand-alone products seem to serve the current, fast paced market better than solutions build into furniture objects due to different life spans (upgrading or out of date). Required high R&D investments to keep up to date are challenges for S&M companies who are concerned about large players (Apple/Google/Telcoms).
  26. 26. Claiming space seems reason to engage despite expected losses. Many companies feel the pressure to move into the IoT space just to stake a claim, but do not expect to generate revenue in the next time.
  27. 27. IT support & HR expertise biggest hurdles for conventional manufacturers Major hurldes for conventional (SME) manufacturers to enter the IoT space seems around HR (staffing) and building IT support in-house once a product is introduced to the market. Trouble-shooting, up- dating (e.g. Apple OS/Android firmware) but also further development of the app side of products are critical.
  28. 28. Ground staff (sales, trades) often not tech savvy enough to advise or service products Sales and trade staff is often not tech savvy enough to give advice, trouble shoot or install products and reluctant to push it accordingly during purchase pitches/decisions. E.g. warranty issues. PWC advised investment in up-skilling. Hoermann
  29. 29. Connectedlivinge.V.Berlin(TUBerlin) Bad WIFI connections can affect perception of product quality Bad Wifi-connections can affect the perception of quality or functionality of products even though failures lay not by them. This can cause bad reviews, user feedback, complaints and more. Hotlines might not be able to help users.
  30. 30. Hidden costs for license fees or subscriptions can deter end-users & manufacturers Hidden costs for end-users in Apps or IoT-router solutions (Qivicon/Morepork) as subscription model can deter potential clients. Licensing fees for using established protocols (Zigbee/Z- wave/EOcean…) or system gateways (Qivicon, Homekit...) are also a hurdle for companies and an unpredictable finacial risk.
  31. 31. Still high privacy concerns around IoT in residential & work places Privacy concerns are still very high (at least in Germany) around connected homes. These seems less of a concern in the US. Such privacy concerns also prevents many applications in the office environment potentially allowing secret surveillance and monitoring (expressed by unions).
  32. 32. AAL solutions
  33. 33. Ambient Assisted Living & Care GenerationtableconceptbyOliverNeuland, 2016 IoT applications integrated into furniture is still seen as niche market. Useful areas of application seem AAL/and care (accepted and relevant to users and businesses). Electronic furniture applications still remain pretty basic (dumb) in areas such as lighting, sound, automation (motor- drive) and some hazard detection.
  34. 34. Mobile app lets you know that your loved one is well and save AAL & Care apps or app-cesories
  35. 35. Left:MylightBedlighthmotionsensorMiddle:RusskaSensormatteRight:RusskaNoisemonitoring Local (Intra) care products
  36. 36. Left:Stiegelmeyere-help-Loadsensorinbackrestsensingfalls&leavingbedRight:WiBoSamrtCarebed Smart care & hospital furniture
  37. 37. Weight sensing concepts Left:LoadstariLoadProDigitalUSBLoadCellKitusedbyFrauenhoferRight:SmartFrocBabyweighinghigh
  38. 38. SEMO feet Concept Oliver Neuland Jing (Julia) Ma
  39. 39. Weight Sensor Micro-Controller Proof of concept
  40. 40. Cloud Storage for weight data Trigger IoT devices Cloud control & storage
  41. 41. Set rules
  42. 42. Weight Sensor Micro-Controller Proof of concept
  43. 43. SEMO components Load cell LEDs Battery Micro controller & Wifi module HX711 Amplifier
  44. 44. SEMO concept
  45. 45. Set up the kit
  46. 46. Getting up at night
  47. 47. Absence alert
  48. 48. Unusual behaviour
  49. 49. Sudden weight loss monitoring
  50. 50. Connected health data & linking routines
  51. 51. Conclusion
  52. 52. Conclusion 1. SeMo Beds 2. Flexible architecture Fusion of technology with design
  53. 53. Multi-Disciplinary Team Product Designers + Software Engineers + Field Experts Farhaan Mirza Oliver Neuland Jing Ma + Others ..
  54. 54. Multi-Disciplinary Team Product Designers + Software Engineers + Field Experts Farhaan Mirza Oliver Neuland Jing Ma + Others ..
  55. 55. Thank you! Farhaan Mirza farhaan.mirza@aut.ac.nz Oliver Neuland oliver@neuland-design.com AUT Computer Sciences & Product Design www.aut.ac.nz Oliver Neuland Design www.neuland-design.de

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