FDI Global Trends

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  • HSBC IN CHINA\n
  • STARBUCKS COFFEE IN CHINA\n
  • MACDONALDS IN RUSSIA\n
  • MCDONALDS IN INDIA\n
  • \nForeign direct investment (FDI) occurs when an investor based in one country (the home country) acquires an asset in another country (the host country) with the intent to manage that asset. The management dimension is what distinguishes FDI from portfolio investment in foreign stocks, bonds and other financial instruments. In most instances, both the investor and the asset it manages abroad are business firms. In such cases, the investor is typically referred to as the “parent firm” and the asset as the “affiliate“ or “subsidiary”.\n
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  • \nGREENFIELD- A form of foreign direct investment where a parent company starts a new venture in a foreign country by constructing new operational facilities from the ground up. provide LONG-TERM BENEFIT: building new facilities, most parent companies also create new long-term jobs in the foreign country by hiring new employees.\n\nTransfers of existing assets from local firms to foreign firms takes place; the primary type of FDI. Cross-border mergers occur when the assets and operation of firms from different countries are combined to establish a new legal entity. Cross-border acquisitions occur when the control of assets and operations is transferred from a local to a foreign company, with the local company becoming an affiliate of the foreign company. Unlike greenfield investment, acquisitions provide no long term benefits to the local economy-- even in most deals the owners of the local firm are paid in stock from the acquiring firm, meaning that the money from the sale could never reach the local economy. Nevertheless, mergers and acquisitions are a significant form of FDI \n\n
  • \nGREENFIELD- A form of foreign direct investment where a parent company starts a new venture in a foreign country by constructing new operational facilities from the ground up. provide LONG-TERM BENEFIT: building new facilities, most parent companies also create new long-term jobs in the foreign country by hiring new employees.\n\nTransfers of existing assets from local firms to foreign firms takes place; the primary type of FDI. Cross-border mergers occur when the assets and operation of firms from different countries are combined to establish a new legal entity. Cross-border acquisitions occur when the control of assets and operations is transferred from a local to a foreign company, with the local company becoming an affiliate of the foreign company. Unlike greenfield investment, acquisitions provide no long term benefits to the local economy-- even in most deals the owners of the local firm are paid in stock from the acquiring firm, meaning that the money from the sale could never reach the local economy. Nevertheless, mergers and acquisitions are a significant form of FDI \n\n
  • Why companies go abroad? \n
  • Market seeking FDI is driven by access to local or regional markets. Investing locally can be driven by regulations or to save on operational costs such as transportation. General Motors’ investment in China is market seeking because the cars built in China are sold in China.\nResource seeking FDI is investment focused on extracting or refining natural resources such as petroleum, natural gas, or timber. The investment is seeking access to existing resources, such as Exxon Mobil investing in oil production in the North Sea\nEfficiency seeking FDI is commonly described as offshoring, or investing in foreign markets to take advantage of a lower cost structure. A credit card company opening a call center in India to serve U.S. customers is a form of efficiency seeking FDI.\nStrategic asset seeking FDI: FDI undertaken to protect or augment the existing ownership specific advantages of the investing firms or to reduce those of their rivals...being in a specific country, gives them a stratigic advantage...if it is a it-tech company, it is good for you to be in US, then in Nigiria...having in US very experienced IT people...or if u r a spamming company u might actually prefer to be in Nigeria\n\n
  • Market seeking FDI is driven by access to local or regional markets. Investing locally can be driven by regulations or to save on operational costs such as transportation. General Motors’ investment in China is market seeking because the cars built in China are sold in China.\nResource seeking FDI is investment focused on extracting or refining natural resources such as petroleum, natural gas, or timber. The investment is seeking access to existing resources, such as Exxon Mobil investing in oil production in the North Sea\nEfficiency seeking FDI is commonly described as offshoring, or investing in foreign markets to take advantage of a lower cost structure. A credit card company opening a call center in India to serve U.S. customers is a form of efficiency seeking FDI.\nStrategic asset seeking FDI: FDI undertaken to protect or augment the existing ownership specific advantages of the investing firms or to reduce those of their rivals...being in a specific country, gives them a stratigic advantage...if it is a it-tech company, it is good for you to be in US, then in Nigiria...having in US very experienced IT people...or if u r a spamming company u might actually prefer to be in Nigeria\n\n
  • Market seeking FDI is driven by access to local or regional markets. Investing locally can be driven by regulations or to save on operational costs such as transportation. General Motors’ investment in China is market seeking because the cars built in China are sold in China.\nResource seeking FDI is investment focused on extracting or refining natural resources such as petroleum, natural gas, or timber. The investment is seeking access to existing resources, such as Exxon Mobil investing in oil production in the North Sea\nEfficiency seeking FDI is commonly described as offshoring, or investing in foreign markets to take advantage of a lower cost structure. A credit card company opening a call center in India to serve U.S. customers is a form of efficiency seeking FDI.\nStrategic asset seeking FDI: FDI undertaken to protect or augment the existing ownership specific advantages of the investing firms or to reduce those of their rivals...being in a specific country, gives them a stratigic advantage...if it is a it-tech company, it is good for you to be in US, then in Nigiria...having in US very experienced IT people...or if u r a spamming company u might actually prefer to be in Nigeria\n\n
  • Market seeking FDI is driven by access to local or regional markets. Investing locally can be driven by regulations or to save on operational costs such as transportation. General Motors’ investment in China is market seeking because the cars built in China are sold in China.\nResource seeking FDI is investment focused on extracting or refining natural resources such as petroleum, natural gas, or timber. The investment is seeking access to existing resources, such as Exxon Mobil investing in oil production in the North Sea\nEfficiency seeking FDI is commonly described as offshoring, or investing in foreign markets to take advantage of a lower cost structure. A credit card company opening a call center in India to serve U.S. customers is a form of efficiency seeking FDI.\nStrategic asset seeking FDI: FDI undertaken to protect or augment the existing ownership specific advantages of the investing firms or to reduce those of their rivals...being in a specific country, gives them a stratigic advantage...if it is a it-tech company, it is good for you to be in US, then in Nigiria...having in US very experienced IT people...or if u r a spamming company u might actually prefer to be in Nigeria\n\n
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  • GLOBAL INVESTMENT ROSE BY 0.7% IN 2010, BUT THIS HIDES SIGNIFICANT Differences IN PERFORMANCE. WHILE THE DEVELOPED ECONOMIES SUFFERED A DECLINE IN FDI BY 7% \n\n\n\nFor the first time, developing and transition economies together attracted more than half of global FDI flows.\nOutward FDI from those economies also reached record highs, with most of their investment directed towards other countries in the South. In contrast, FDI inflows to developed countries continued to decline.\n\n\n\n\n
  • The US has maintained its position as the number one global destination country for FDI for the second successive year, extending its lead on China in terms of project numbers attracted. US benefits from its position as the world’s number one consumer and industrial market, as well as from the weakening of the US dollar against the euro which increases the competitiveness of the US as an export location.\n\nChina has all the necessary attributes to be a leading FDI destination, not as a low-cost production site, but as major economy in its own.\nChina has been ranked as a first place of global attractiveness place for FDI.\n\nWestern europe still has her attraction, appealing investors with her relative political stability, predictable legal environment and talent pool.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n
  • The US has maintained its position as the number one global destination country for FDI for the second successive year, extending its lead on China in terms of project numbers attracted. US benefits from its position as the world’s number one consumer and industrial market, as well as from the weakening of the US dollar against the euro which increases the competitiveness of the US as an export location.\n\nChina has all the necessary attributes to be a leading FDI destination, not as a low-cost production site, but as major economy in its own.\nChina has been ranked as a first place of global attractiveness place for FDI.\n\nWestern europe still has her attraction, appealing investors with her relative political stability, predictable legal environment and talent pool.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n
  • CHINA IS OVERTAKING JAPAN TO BECOME THE WORLD’S SECOND-BIGGEST ECONOMY MARKS A MILESTONE AFTER 30 YEARS OF RAPID ECONOMIC GROWTH. FDI INTO CHINA CONTINUE TO GROW (+6.3), BUT AT A SLOWER PACE THAN DURING THE PREVIOUS 10 YEARS\n
  • BRAZIL EXPERIENCED 16.3% GROWTH IN FDI, WHILE ITS GDP GREW BY 7.5 % IN 2010. NOW THE WORLD’S 8TH- LARGEST ECONOMY, IT COULD OVERTAKE BRITAIN, FRANCE AND ITALY BY THE END OF THIS DECADE WITH BOOMING COMMODITIES, STRONG CONSUMER SPENDING AND US$50B OF INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENTS GENERATED BY THE 2014 FIFA WORLD CUP AND 2016 OLYMPICS.\n\n.\n
  • Central and Eastern Europe was ranked by investors in third place. In Central and Eastern europe companies see DYNAMIC, STABLE and SKILLED location alternatives at a LOVER COST.\n\nSuch regions like POLAND, HUNGARY or the BALTICS (ESTONIA, LATVIA, LITHUANIA) are re-emerging as lower cost near-shoring locations with a quality workforce on the doorstep of Western Europe.\n\n
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  • Uk and france remain FDI leaders in Europe, but they are losing market share to countries such as Germany and host of smaller cost/competitive countries for example Poland Hungary and the Baltics.\n\nUK ITS STRENGTH IN SERVICES, INVESTING IN BUSINESS SERVICES, MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT, COMPUTER & SOFTWARE.\nIT REMAINS HIGLY ATTRACTIVE DESTINATION \nA WEAKER POUND HAS ENTICED INVESTORS ALREADY CONSIDERING THE UK FOR SERVICE SECTOR INVESTMENTS.\n\nFRANCE...NEARLY LOST IT SECOND POSITION(BY NR OF PROJECTS)\n FROM 16 TO 15%. \nBUSINESS SERVICES, SOFTWARE & MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT.\n\nGERMANY... BUSINESS SERVICES, MACHINERY& EQUIPMENT AND SOFTWARE.\n STRONG ECONOMIC GROWTH OUTLOOK, SOUND FISCAL POLICY AND ENTREPRENEURIAL CULTURE.\n\nRUSSIA... AUTOMOTIVE,CHEMICALS, WOOD SECTORS. GREENFIEL INVESTORS COME TO RUSSIA FOR RAW MATERIALS AND INDUSTRIAL PROJECTS.\n\nSPAIN... NR OF PROJECT S DECLINED, BUT JOB CREATION REACHED 7.723, \nFROM 3 AUTOMOTIVE PROJECTS THAT MADE UP 70% OT THE JOB CREATED.\nIN BUSINESS SERVICES AND SOFTWARE.\n\n
  • The US, germany and the UK remain the leading source for FDI in Europe. \n\nFROM NORTH AMERICA\nCOMPANIES CONTINUED TO INVEST IN EUROPE.KEY INVESTORS INCLUDED GENERAL ELECTRIC, FEDEX, IBM & GENERAL MOTORS. HP CREATED THE MOST JOBS IN EUROPE IN IT-RELATED INVESTMENT PROJECTS.\n\nFrom europe:\nEUROPEANS ARE THE LARGEST INVESTORS IN EUROPE. GERMANY STANDS OUT AS IT IS A LARGEST INVESTOR IN EUROPE, ACCOUNTING FO 10% OF FDI AND 18% OF JOB CREATION. GER’S VW THE SECOND LARGEST INVESTOR IN EUROPE, both in terms of projects and jobs created. ALSO BIG INVESTORS FROM GERMANY ARE AUTOMOTIVE & TECHNOLOGY GROUP BOSCH AND RAIL DEUTSCHE BAHN. \n\nFROM ASIA. ALTHOUGH U CANNOT SEE THOSE COUNTRIES ON THE SLIDE, Asian countries continue to find investment opportunities attractive in EU. in addition to Japan and China, there is a newcomer South Korea, created 67 project s in eu, Yura tech (car ignition systems manufacturer) \n
  • DOUBLED, CREATING 54% more jobs. Highlight of a sector- business services :Accenture creating 875 jobs in France and IT shared services centre: IBM employing 2000 people in Poland.\n\nSoftware -Highlights:TIETO (Swedish-Finish company) -500 & AVG TEchnologies (Holland)400 jobs in Central and Eastern Europe.\n\nAutomotive: VW was the largest investor - 3,910 jobs created.\nGeneral motors(US), Chery Automotive (China) and Volvo Swedish/Chinese were also investors, showing Europe is an attractive investment location for non-EU companies.\n\nnext, strengths of Europe\n\n
  • DOUBLED, CREATING 54% more jobs. Highlight of a sector- business services :Accenture creating 875 jobs in France and IT shared services centre: IBM employing 2000 people in Poland.\n\nSoftware -Highlights:TIETO (Swedish-Finish company) -500 & AVG TEchnologies (Holland)400 jobs in Central and Eastern Europe.\n\nAutomotive: VW was the largest investor - 3,910 jobs created.\nGeneral motors(US), Chery Automotive (China) and Volvo Swedish/Chinese were also investors, showing Europe is an attractive investment location for non-EU companies.\n\nnext, strengths of Europe\n\n
  • DOUBLED, CREATING 54% more jobs. Highlight of a sector- business services :Accenture creating 875 jobs in France and IT shared services centre: IBM employing 2000 people in Poland.\n\nSoftware -Highlights:TIETO (Swedish-Finish company) -500 & AVG TEchnologies (Holland)400 jobs in Central and Eastern Europe.\n\nAutomotive: VW was the largest investor - 3,910 jobs created.\nGeneral motors(US), Chery Automotive (China) and Volvo Swedish/Chinese were also investors, showing Europe is an attractive investment location for non-EU companies.\n\nnext, strengths of Europe\n\n
  • DOUBLED, CREATING 54% more jobs. Highlight of a sector- business services :Accenture creating 875 jobs in France and IT shared services centre: IBM employing 2000 people in Poland.\n\nSoftware -Highlights:TIETO (Swedish-Finish company) -500 & AVG TEchnologies (Holland)400 jobs in Central and Eastern Europe.\n\nAutomotive: VW was the largest investor - 3,910 jobs created.\nGeneral motors(US), Chery Automotive (China) and Volvo Swedish/Chinese were also investors, showing Europe is an attractive investment location for non-EU companies.\n\nnext, strengths of Europe\n\n
  • DOUBLED, CREATING 54% more jobs. Highlight of a sector- business services :Accenture creating 875 jobs in France and IT shared services centre: IBM employing 2000 people in Poland.\n\nSoftware -Highlights:TIETO (Swedish-Finish company) -500 & AVG TEchnologies (Holland)400 jobs in Central and Eastern Europe.\n\nAutomotive: VW was the largest investor - 3,910 jobs created.\nGeneral motors(US), Chery Automotive (China) and Volvo Swedish/Chinese were also investors, showing Europe is an attractive investment location for non-EU companies.\n\nnext, strengths of Europe\n\n
  • Europe is known for being high-cost but stable, with wide talent pool\nEurope strengths are:\nhigh quality and diverse labour force\na society that emphasizes social responsibility\na predictable business environment\n\nthis reputation for quality and the ability to innovate encourage companies to invest in europe.\n\nnext is 2 years driving sectors \n\n
  • Europe is known for being high-cost but stable, with wide talent pool\nEurope strengths are:\nhigh quality and diverse labour force\na society that emphasizes social responsibility\na predictable business environment\n\nthis reputation for quality and the ability to innovate encourage companies to invest in europe.\n\nnext is 2 years driving sectors \n\n
  • Europe is known for being high-cost but stable, with wide talent pool\nEurope strengths are:\nhigh quality and diverse labour force\na society that emphasizes social responsibility\na predictable business environment\n\nthis reputation for quality and the ability to innovate encourage companies to invest in europe.\n\nnext is 2 years driving sectors \n\n
  • Europe is known for being high-cost but stable, with wide talent pool\nEurope strengths are:\nhigh quality and diverse labour force\na society that emphasizes social responsibility\na predictable business environment\n\nthis reputation for quality and the ability to innovate encourage companies to invest in europe.\n\nnext is 2 years driving sectors \n\n
  • Europe is known for being high-cost but stable, with wide talent pool\nEurope strengths are:\nhigh quality and diverse labour force\na society that emphasizes social responsibility\na predictable business environment\n\nthis reputation for quality and the ability to innovate encourage companies to invest in europe.\n\nnext is 2 years driving sectors \n\n
  • Europe is known for being high-cost but stable, with wide talent pool\nEurope strengths are:\nhigh quality and diverse labour force\na society that emphasizes social responsibility\na predictable business environment\n\nthis reputation for quality and the ability to innovate encourage companies to invest in europe.\n\nnext is 2 years driving sectors \n\n
  • INVESTORS SEE EUROPE AS A NATURAL CENTRE FOR HIGH VALUE-ADDED GOODS AND SERVICES.\nIT &ICT WILL BE THE STRONGEST DRIVERS IN THE NEXT 2 YEARS.\n\nEurope is a leader in those sectors and aided by consumer and industrial demand for technology, but also by pan-european policies designed to reduce carbon emissions and create a supply-side green economy.\n\nnext : how to improve europe\n
  • INVESTORS SEE EUROPE AS A NATURAL CENTRE FOR HIGH VALUE-ADDED GOODS AND SERVICES.\nIT &ICT WILL BE THE STRONGEST DRIVERS IN THE NEXT 2 YEARS.\n\nEurope is a leader in those sectors and aided by consumer and industrial demand for technology, but also by pan-european policies designed to reduce carbon emissions and create a supply-side green economy.\n\nnext : how to improve europe\n
  • INVESTORS SEE EUROPE AS A NATURAL CENTRE FOR HIGH VALUE-ADDED GOODS AND SERVICES.\nIT &ICT WILL BE THE STRONGEST DRIVERS IN THE NEXT 2 YEARS.\n\nEurope is a leader in those sectors and aided by consumer and industrial demand for technology, but also by pan-european policies designed to reduce carbon emissions and create a supply-side green economy.\n\nnext : how to improve europe\n
  • INVESTORS SEE EUROPE AS A NATURAL CENTRE FOR HIGH VALUE-ADDED GOODS AND SERVICES.\nIT &ICT WILL BE THE STRONGEST DRIVERS IN THE NEXT 2 YEARS.\n\nEurope is a leader in those sectors and aided by consumer and industrial demand for technology, but also by pan-european policies designed to reduce carbon emissions and create a supply-side green economy.\n\nnext : how to improve europe\n
  • INVESTORS SEE EUROPE AS A NATURAL CENTRE FOR HIGH VALUE-ADDED GOODS AND SERVICES.\nIT &ICT WILL BE THE STRONGEST DRIVERS IN THE NEXT 2 YEARS.\n\nEurope is a leader in those sectors and aided by consumer and industrial demand for technology, but also by pan-european policies designed to reduce carbon emissions and create a supply-side green economy.\n\nnext : how to improve europe\n
  • INVESTORS SEE EUROPE AS A NATURAL CENTRE FOR HIGH VALUE-ADDED GOODS AND SERVICES.\nIT &ICT WILL BE THE STRONGEST DRIVERS IN THE NEXT 2 YEARS.\n\nEurope is a leader in those sectors and aided by consumer and industrial demand for technology, but also by pan-european policies designed to reduce carbon emissions and create a supply-side green economy.\n\nnext : how to improve europe\n
  • INVESTORS SEE EUROPE AS A NATURAL CENTRE FOR HIGH VALUE-ADDED GOODS AND SERVICES.\nIT &ICT WILL BE THE STRONGEST DRIVERS IN THE NEXT 2 YEARS.\n\nEurope is a leader in those sectors and aided by consumer and industrial demand for technology, but also by pan-european policies designed to reduce carbon emissions and create a supply-side green economy.\n\nnext : how to improve europe\n
  • To maintain its place and increase its share of the increasingly competitive world FDI market, Europe needs to create a business environment with lower taxes and labour costs.\nPolicy makers needs to support entrepreneurship\nGovernments initiatives should support small/medium enterprises.\n\n
  • To maintain its place and increase its share of the increasingly competitive world FDI market, Europe needs to create a business environment with lower taxes and labour costs.\nPolicy makers needs to support entrepreneurship\nGovernments initiatives should support small/medium enterprises.\n\n
  • To maintain its place and increase its share of the increasingly competitive world FDI market, Europe needs to create a business environment with lower taxes and labour costs.\nPolicy makers needs to support entrepreneurship\nGovernments initiatives should support small/medium enterprises.\n\n
  • To maintain its place and increase its share of the increasingly competitive world FDI market, Europe needs to create a business environment with lower taxes and labour costs.\nPolicy makers needs to support entrepreneurship\nGovernments initiatives should support small/medium enterprises.\n\n
  • To maintain its place and increase its share of the increasingly competitive world FDI market, Europe needs to create a business environment with lower taxes and labour costs.\nPolicy makers needs to support entrepreneurship\nGovernments initiatives should support small/medium enterprises.\n\n
  • To maintain its place and increase its share of the increasingly competitive world FDI market, Europe needs to create a business environment with lower taxes and labour costs.\nPolicy makers needs to support entrepreneurship\nGovernments initiatives should support small/medium enterprises.\n\n
  • To maintain its place and increase its share of the increasingly competitive world FDI market, Europe needs to create a business environment with lower taxes and labour costs.\nPolicy makers needs to support entrepreneurship\nGovernments initiatives should support small/medium enterprises.\n\n
  • The nr of projects has increased from 33 to 61, with Lithuania leading the region, with 31 project announced.\nInvestors come to the Baltics to invest in Air transportation, financial services and utilities.\n
  • Estonian companies have made significant foreign investments of its own, mainly (55.3%) in Latvia and Lithuania.\n
  • We have spoke about FDI definitions, Global FDI highlights and some EU trends.\nEle will talk to us about LT ja LV situation.\n\nAll we have to do, is to define our strengths and trends.\n\nBon Appetite!\n
  • \n
  • FDI Global Trends

    1. 1. FOREIGNDIRECTINVESTMENTSGLOBALTRENDSERNST & YOUNG EUROPEANATTRACTIVENESS SURVEY 2011FDI SPECIAL REPORT 2011UNCTAD WORLD INVESTMENT REPORT 2011
    2. 2. Today’s menu: Theory class Global Highlights European trends
    3. 3. A LITTLE BIT OF THEORY...
    4. 4. A LITTLE BIT OF THEORY...
    5. 5. so...WHAT IS FDI?
    6. 6. Foreign direct investment(FDI) occurs when an investorbased in one country (thehome country) acquires anasset in another country (thehost country) with the intentto manage that asset.
    7. 7. FOREIGN DIRECTINVESTMENTS MAINTYPES OF ENTRY
    8. 8. GREENFIELD
    9. 9. GREENFIELD M&A
    10. 10. WHY FDI?
    11. 11. FDI
    12. 12. FDIMARKET
    13. 13. NATURALRESOURCE FDI MARKET
    14. 14. EFFICIENCYNATURALRESOURCE FDI MARKET
    15. 15. EFFICIENCYNATURALRESOURCE FDI STRATEGIC- ASSET MARKET
    16. 16. GLOBAL HIGHLIGHTS GLOBAL HIGHLIGHTS
    17. 17. 0.7% RISE OF GLOBAL FDI FLOWS IN 20107% DECLINE IN FDI INFLOWS OFDEVELOPED COUNTRIES52% OF GLOBAL FDIRECEIVED BY EMERGINGECONOMIESOUTWARD FDI FROM THOSE ECONOMIES ALSO REACHED RECORD HIGHS
    18. 18. US WORLD CHINADESTINATIONS UK INDIA GERMANY US WORLD UK SOURCES GERMANY JAPAN FRANCE
    19. 19. US WORLD CHINADESTINATIONS UK INDIA GERMANY US WORLD UK SOURCES GERMANY JAPAN FRANCE
    20. 20. US WORLD CHINADESTINATIONS UK INDIA GERMANY US WORLD UK SOURCES GERMANY JAPAN FRANCE
    21. 21. CHINAOVERTAKESJAPAN
    22. 22. BRAZILSoars on the back of COMMODITIES and CONSUMERS
    23. 23. BRAZILSoars on the back of COMMODITIES and CONSUMERS
    24. 24. Central and EasternEurope is coming back
    25. 25. WHERE DID INVESTMENT GO?
    26. 26. SOURCES OF FDI IN EUROPE
    27. 27. FDI IN EUROPE BY SECTOR
    28. 28. FDI IN EUROPE BY SECTORBUSINESS SERVICES
    29. 29. FDI IN EUROPE BY SECTORBUSINESS SERVICES SOFTWARE
    30. 30. FDI IN EUROPE BY SECTORBUSINESS SERVICES SOFTWAREMACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT
    31. 31. FDI IN EUROPE BY SECTORBUSINESS SERVICES SOFTWAREMACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT AUTOMOTIVE
    32. 32. FDI IN EUROPE BY SECTORBUSINESS SERVICES SOFTWAREMACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS
    33. 33. EUROPE’S VALUE PROPOSITION
    34. 34. EUROPE’S VALUE PROPOSITIONDIVERSITY AND QUALITY OF LABOURFORCE
    35. 35. EUROPE’S VALUE PROPOSITIONDIVERSITY AND QUALITY OF LABOURFORCEEMPHASIS ON SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY
    36. 36. EUROPE’S VALUE PROPOSITIONDIVERSITY AND QUALITY OF LABOURFORCEEMPHASIS ON SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYPREDICTABLE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT
    37. 37. EUROPE’S VALUE PROPOSITIONDIVERSITY AND QUALITY OF LABOURFORCEEMPHASIS ON SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYPREDICTABLE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTEMPHASIS ON GREEN BUSINESS
    38. 38. EUROPE’S VALUE PROPOSITIONDIVERSITY AND QUALITY OF LABOURFORCEEMPHASIS ON SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYPREDICTABLE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTEMPHASIS ON GREEN BUSINESSRESEARCH AND INNOVATION CAPACITY
    39. 39. EUROPE’S VALUE PROPOSITIONDIVERSITY AND QUALITY OF LABOURFORCEEMPHASIS ON SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITYPREDICTABLE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTEMPHASIS ON GREEN BUSINESSRESEARCH AND INNOVATION CAPACITYDEVELOPMENT OF WORLD CLASSBUSINESS CLUSTER
    40. 40. Text
    41. 41. Whichsectors willdrive Europe Text in next 2 years?
    42. 42. 1.ICT Whichsectors willdrive Europe Text in next 2 years?
    43. 43. 1.ICT Which 2. CLEAN TECHsectors willdrive Europe Text in next 2 years?
    44. 44. 1.ICT Which 2. CLEAN TECHsectors will 3.ENERGY ANDdrive Europe UTILITIES Text in next 2 years?
    45. 45. 1.ICT Which 2. CLEAN TECHsectors will 3.ENERGY ANDdrive Europe UTILITIES Text in next 4. B to B SERVICES 2 years?
    46. 46. 1.ICT Which 2. CLEAN TECHsectors will 3.ENERGY ANDdrive Europe UTILITIES Text in next 4. B to B SERVICES 2 years? 5.PHARMA & BIOTECH
    47. 47. 1.ICT Which 2. CLEAN TECHsectors will 3.ENERGY ANDdrive Europe UTILITIES Text in next 4. B to B SERVICES 2 years? 5.PHARMA & BIOTECH 6.TRANSPORT & AUTOMOTIVE
    48. 48. HOW TO IMPROVE EUROPE’SATTRACTIVENESS ?
    49. 49. HOW TO IMPROVE EUROPE’SATTRACTIVENESS ? ION XAT ER TALOW
    50. 50. HOW TO IMPROVE EUROPE’SATTRACTIVENESS ? ION XAT ER TA SLOW ABO RC OST E RL L OW
    51. 51. HOW TO IMPROVE EUROPE’SATTRACTIVENESS ? ION XAT ER TA SLOW ABO RC OST ISES L RPR LOWER M ENTE M EDIU ALL AND T SM SUPPOR
    52. 52. HOW TO IMPROVE EUROPE’S ATTRACTIVENESS ? ION XAT ER TA S LOW ABO RC OST ISES L RPR ION LOWER ENTE VAT ME DIUM I NNO AND ND SMA LL STRIES A RT IND U S UPPO CH IGH -TE RT HSU PPO
    53. 53. HOW TO IMPROVE EUROPE’S ATTRACTIVENESS ? ION XAT ER TA S LOW ABO RC OST ISES L RPR ION LOWER ENTE VAT ME DIUM I NNO AND ND SMA LL STRIES A RT IND U UPPO S H-T ECH RELA IG X COMP RT H ETITIOSU PPO N RU LES
    54. 54. HOW TO IMPROVE EUROPE’S ATTRACTIVENESS ? ION XAT ER TA S LOW ABO RC OST ISES L RPR ION LOWER ENTE VAT ME DIUM I NNO AND ND SMA LL STRIES A RT IND U UPPO S H-T ECH RELA IG X COMP RT H INVES ETITIOSU PPO T IN I NFRA STRUC N RU TURE AND U LES RBAN REGIO NS
    55. 55. LITHUANIA LEADINGTHE REGION
    56. 56. Sweden -35 % Latvia &Finland - 23 % LithuaniaNetherlands - 9.6 % 55.3%
    57. 57. Just before lunch : FDI definition Global highlights European trends Ele: Lithuania, LatviaAll of us: define our trends and strengths after lunch... Bon Appetite!
    58. 58. Thank You! :)

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