SOCIAL JUSTICE

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Social Work as A Profession: Social Justice

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SOCIAL JUSTICE

  1. 1. Social Work as a Profession: SOCIAL JUSTICE
  2. 2. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: Topic Content: I. DEFINING SOCIAL JUSTICE II. SOCIAL WORK’S MANDATE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE III. BARRIERS TO SOCIAL JUSTICE IV. SOCIAL WORK ROLES IN FIGHTING SOCIAL INJUSTICE
  3. 3. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: I. DEFINING SOCIAL JUSTICE -Marjorie De Guzman
  4. 4. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: SOCIAL JUSTICE is … Justice exercised within a society, particularly as it is applied to and among the various social classes of a society. A socially just society is one based upon the principles of equality and solidarity; which pedagogy also maintains that a socially just society both understands and values human rights, as well as recognizing the dignity of every human being.
  5. 5. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: II. SOCIAL WORK’S MANDATE FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE - Audrey Casiano
  6. 6. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: NASW CODE OF ETHICS Social Work as a profession is unique in its commitment to social justice—the level of fairness that exists in society. “Social Workers promote social justice and social change, with and on behalf clients… Social Workers are sensitive to cultural and ethnic diversity and strive to end discrimination, oppression, poverty and other forms of social injustice”
  7. 7. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: COUNCIL ON SOCIAL WORK EDUCATION Social Work’s purpose is actualized through its quest for social and economic justice, the prevention of conditions that limit human rights, the elimination of poverty, and the enhancement of the quality of life for all persons. (CSWE,2011a,p.1)
  8. 8. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: Human rights and social justice serve as the motivation and justification for social work action. Working for social justice means striving to create a society in which all people, regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, economic status, age, or physical or mental ability, have the same basic rights and opportunities and can develop to their fullest potential
  9. 9. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: III. BARRIERS TO SOCIAL JUSTICE -Marjorie De Guzman
  10. 10. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: 1) Challenges to legitimacy The perceived legitimacy of civil society advocacy for social justice can be challenged on a number of different fronts: • Insufficient legal protections for civil society organizations or inadequate administration of the legal protections that exist; • Perceived lack of representational structures linking civil society organizations to those on whose behalf they claim to speak; • Lack of media attention and resulting limited public perception of civil society organizations and their capabilities; • A sense that advocacy is “political” in nature and not the business of civil society organizations; lack of acceptance of civil society organizations as legitimate actors in the “political” arena; • Lack of political expertise on the part of civil society organizations.
  11. 11. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: 2) Insufficient Resources A second crucial barrier to social justice advocacy is the limited availability of resources to support it. Civil society organizations typically find it easier to generate support for direct service activities than for advocacy activities, even though the advocacy activities can have the potential for greater impact. Both the human and financial resources for social justice advocacy can be limited. Advocacy is a long-term undertaking that depends importantly on building relationships of trust. Support for such long-term activity is often difficult to find and, once found, difficult to sustain, particularly in conditions of poverty.
  12. 12. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: 3) Fragmentation among Advocacy Organizations While advocacy is most effective when done in collaboration, those engaged in social justice advocacy sometimes find it difficult to make common cause. Issues of tactics and credibility, personality conflicts, and organizational competition for credit or resources can often get in the way of effective coalitions.
  13. 13. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: 4) Unresponsive Institutions Ultimately, effective advocacy requires responsiveness on the part of those in positions of authority, whether in public or private institutions. In addition, advocates are often denied the information they need to target their advocacy most effectively. Even when decision makers are responsive to advocacy, moreover, administrative systems may be incapable, or unwilling, to execute the decisions reached.
  14. 14. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: IV. SOCIAL WORK ROLES IN FIGHTING SOCIAL INJUSTICE - Faye Inclino
  15. 15. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: Social Injustice a relative concept about the claimed unfairness or injustice of a society in its divisions of rewards and burdens and other incidental inequalities based on the user's worldview of humanity. • Immorality is often used as a synonym for this.
  16. 16. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: Social workers can be involved in fighting social injustice Involvement in organizing members of oppressed and oppressor groups and legislative advocacy to develop and encourage the passage and implementation of legislation that protects the rights of all people and lessens the social and economic gasps between dominant and non-dominant groups.
  17. 17. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: • Helping clients find and meet with others in similar circumstances so that they can work together to solve problems. • Ensuring that clients know agency policies, including grievance policies, so that they can advocate for their rights • Teaching clients when threats or disruptions might be effective in getting their needs met. • Supporting client’s decisions about what is right for their lives. Professional’s social workers can work to empower clients to take more control in their lives over their lives. This can involve:
  18. 18. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: Social worker must also try to find ways to bridge gaps between oppressed groups that have common concerns and that could benefit by overcoming barriers and working together. This can be done by mediating community conflicts that keep members from working each other by starting programs to bring together groups and explore differences and commonalities and learn to work together.
  19. 19. SOCIAL JUSTICESocial Work as a Profession: Social workers need to be involved in addressing all forms of oppression. Allowing one type of oppression to continue justifies all types of oppressions. “The tendency for inequalities to intensify in societies, once they are initiated on a small scale has important implications for social workers and others who advocate reduction rather than elimination of inequalities: as long as inequalities, at any level, are considered legitimate and being enforced by governments, competitive, interactions focused on restructuring inequalities tend to continue among individuals, social groups, and classes, and a genuine sense of community and solidarity is unlikely to evolve.” (Gil,1998)
  20. 20. THANK YOU

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