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Creation to Classroom OETC 2017

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Presentation about OER and Affordable Learning from two university press publishers, two library consortia, and a university librarian

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Creation to Classroom OETC 2017

  1. 1. From Creation to Classroom OER Journeys from Production to Adoption Leila Salisbury, Director, University Press of Kentucky Tony Sanfilippo, Director, Ohio State University Press Teri Oaks Gallaway, Interim Executive Director, LOUIS Kelly Broughton, Assistant Dean for Research and Education Services, Ohio University Moderator: Gwen Evans, Executive Director, OhioLINK
  2. 2. Affordable Learning in OhioLINK O Governor’s announcement in January 2017 O OhioLINK joined Open Textbook Network as a system in 2017 and will hold regional workshops during Fall. OSU, CSU, MU, YSU are already individual members. O In 2011, OhioLINK had a $750,000 Educause Next Generation Learning Challenge Grant for OER materials: http://nextgenlearning.org/grantee/ohiolink O Current library-led initiatives written up here: ohiolink.edu/affordability
  3. 3. • 500,000 FTE, 93 institutions • One commercial publisher title list in Ohio: 6360 titles in 100+ subjects • Open Textbook Library titles: 300 • OpenStax titles: 21 titles by 2017 • OpenSuny titles: 17 The Problem is Scale
  4. 4. Jen Waller Open Educational Resources & Scholarly Communication Coordinator University of Oklahoma, Bizzell Memorial Library email communication on OTN listserv Feb 13 2017 quote used by permission Many people, myself included, are surprised at the number of faculty members who want to create their own textbooks. While this is a very worthy and lofty goal, I might caution against it early on in your program. While this is a very worthy and lofty goal, I might cautionWhile this is a very worthy and lofty goal, I might cautionWhile this is a very worthy and lofty goal, I might caution against it early on in your program. Creating textbooksagainst it early on in your program.against it early on in your program.against it early on in your program. takes significantly more against it early on in your program.against it early on in your program. Creating textbooksCreating textbooksCreating textbooksagainst it early on in your program. takes significantly more support, which may prove totakes significantly moretakes significantly moretakes significantly moretakes significantly moretakes significantly moretakes significantly moretakes significantly moretakes significantly more support, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove to be challenging if you don’t have support, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove tosupport, which may prove to be challenging if you don’t havebe challenging if you don’t have staff and/or studentsbe challenging if you don’t havebe challenging if you don’t havebe challenging if you don’t havebe challenging if you don’t have to help. Of course, there are lots of outside resources (e.g. Rebus Community, this network, etc.) willing to help. But I still think it’s tougher than many might imagine. I would certainly encourage faculty members (and you) to thoroughly consider what’s involved in creating a textbook from scratch. You can take a look at our new support model for this year’s grant cycle, and you’ll see that a lot of our time/energy could be spent on the “creation” category if we took on a number of these projects. spent on the “creation” category if we took on a number ofspent on the “creation” category if we took on a number ofspent on the “creation” category if we took on a number ofspent on the “creation” category if we took on a number of these projects. As it is, I don’t expect we will take onthese projects.these projects. more than 1 these projects.these projects. more than 1more than 1- Jen WallerJen Waller As it is, I don’t expect we will take onAs it is, I don’t expect we will take onAs it is, I don’t expect we will take onthese projects. As it is, I don’t expect we will take on more than 1more than 1-2 this year.
  5. 5. Support offered via University of Oklahoma Libraries
  6. 6. Production: The (non-profit) publisher perspective Leila Salisbury, Director, University Press of Kentucky Tony Sanfilippo, Director, Ohio State University Press O In terms of producing content made for academia, what are the biggest hidden costs that you think OER at scale needs to address? What economic realities in publishing have to be addressed? O What is the role of the publisher in managing rights and permissions for published content? What implications are there for producers of OER at scale?
  7. 7. Open Educational Resources FACULTY, LIBRARIES, PUBLISHERS, AND STUDENTS WORKING TOGETHER
  8. 8. The problem of textbooks  Students respond to the high price of textbooks by not purchasing, sharing, illegally downloading, etc. Studies indicate that students not using course texts perform less successfully, which leads to issues with student retention  There may not be a textbook suitable for certain specialized courses  Open or public domain readings may exist, but students want to be able to use to same edition or to have access to ancillary material
  9. 9. Perceived challenges of OER materials  Lack of time: With busy teaching loads, there’s little time to investigate or create custom course textbooks  Lack of funds: Licensing material may take money; are there resources?  Lack of quality materials: Are quality materials or peer-reviewed textbooks even available?  Lack of student engagement: students want traditional textbooks, ancillary materials, and print they can annotate and highlight
  10. 10. OER solutions are a click away  The University of Kentucky Libraries has an extensive guide to OER resources, including links to open textbooks, videos of faculty discussing how they implemented OERs, and an explanation of available grant funding for open textbooks: http://libguides.uky.edu/alternative_textbooks/find  Solutions can also be a combination of faculty-created material and published material that the UK Libraries have already acquired or licensed; this makes better use of library-owned resources and expedites the creation of course materials (solves some permissions issues)
  11. 11. A case study: Robin DeRosa at Plymouth State University (NH)  English professor Robin DeRosa realized her students were paying more than $85/semester for mostly public domain materials  She had no funds and was teaching a 4/4 load, but she successfully put together a student-led textbook using the Pressbooks platform (https://pressbooks.com/)  She trained her students to find open/public domain versions of the desired readings for the course
  12. 12. How she improved the textbook  Students missed the ancillary materials. So students from the class built out those resources, each according to his/her interests and strengths: some made videos, some created maps, some wrote section introductions.  DeRosa overlaid the Hypothesis app onto the web-based book to allow social sharing/reading and annotation; during the semester, students created more than 10K annotations (https://hypothes.is/education/)  High level of student buy-in: they liked building something that would be of use to others (the book is now in use at several institutions); students listed as authors; students liked the multimedia aspect of the project
  13. 13. Things to consider  Metadata! This is sometimes a problem for OERs. Using a properly created Creative Commons license can help alleviate this as the process does include metadata. Publisher involvement (the presence of a POD print edition) may significantly enhance discoverability  Hosting & discoverability: Faculty need a place to lodge their OER materials and to have the metadata that will make the resource discoverable to others. Libraries can work with faculty to make the resource more discoverable through linking to other OER websites  Who’s responsible? The scholarship is in the purview of the faculty, and the rest of the process should be in collaboration with the library so the material is properly licensed, hosted, and sharable
  14. 14. Publisher Challenges  Peer review: Is this managed by a library or publisher? Who is the project manager overseeing this part of the process?  Rights: Third party content, especially for an open product, is expensive; is this the responsibility of the publisher or a library?  Who pays for the value added? Copyediting, proofreading, and typesetting are often done by freelancers and have tangible costs. What happens when an OER needs to be updated (and reedited, reflowed, etc.)?  The possible domination of the reduced textbook market by commercial academic publishers (they have a large sales force and wide distribution networks); see the Indiana University case of campus-level licensing
  15. 15. How to improve faculty acceptance and creation of OERs  DeRosa finds that only 20-30% of faculty may know anything about OERs, so education is the first big hurdle  Traditional OER talking points have centered around textbook costs, and this is a tough sell. Talk about PEDAGOGY instead.  With a pedagogical approach, students are doing the bulk of the work. They are engaged in applied learning, and she found this encouraged a critical thinking approach in the classroom  Cultivate faculty champions. Faculty champions/coalitions of the willing have higher conversion rates than relying on rhetoric about student success policies
  16. 16. Further reading and resources  Robin DeRosa talks about the process of creating her open textbook: http://robinderosa.net/uncategorized/my-open- textbook-pedagogy-and-practice/  Learn about Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data, develop critical skills, and catalyze action toward a more open system of research and education: http://www.opencon2016.org/  Other LibGuides: http://www.library.umass.edu/services/teaching- and-learning/oer/; http://libguides.northshore.edu/open
  17. 17. A case study
  18. 18.  Full spectrum publisher  Journals  Monographs (open access after five years)  Trade books  Creative works  International fiction bestseller, …And the Ladies of the Club  National Book Critic Circle award for poetry, Saving Lives  Regional books  Textbook
  19. 19.  First published by the Linguistics Department in the 1970s  In 1991, began working with the Press for the 5th edition  Initially created for use exclusively by OSU students.  Revenue currently accounts for ~1/3 of our budget  Their share of the revenue pays for a full time faculty member  12th edition published in May, 2016  Ebook released in September, 2016  Never available as an ebook previously  On pirate sites within two weeks
  20. 20. Printing, $69,118 Typesetting, $2,889 Copyediting, $2,516 Cover, $733 ebook files, $720 Index,… Direct Staff… Share of Overhead, $51,300 Print Distribution, $40,560 Digital Distribution, $671
  21. 21. LF 10 LF 11 LF 12 Original pub date May 2007 June 2011 July 2016 Printing (original) $88,548.00 $129,618.76 $69,117.63 Printing (correction) $42,152.84 Printing (reprint) $14,885.00*March, 2010) $5,351.34*POD Typesetting $20,389.65 *Outsourced, included design $17,256.65 $2,889.00 *value of in-house hours Copyediting in-house in-house $2,516.50 Cover Design $700.00 $733.00 eBook Conversion $719.15 Index (A) $2,945.00 $4,599.00 $4,207.00 TOTAL $126,767.65 $199,678.59 $80,182.28 Copies Printed (original) 40,000 44,304 25,644 Copies Printed (reprint) 5,002 410
  22. 22. Date Price Incr Incr Language Files (10th ed.) 2007 $40.95 $42.95 7/08 $44.95 6/10 Language Files (11th ed.) 2011 $49.95 $59.95 2/12 Language Files (12th ed.) 2016 $74.95(ebook $44.95)
  23. 23.  Language Files, 12th edition (OSU Press)  2106, 8½ x 11, 765 pages, $74.95, $44.95 ebook  Linguistics: An Intro to Language &Communication, 6th edition (MIT Press)  2010, 7 x 10, 648 pages, $60, Not available as an ebook  Linguistics: An Introduction, 2nd edition (Bloomsbury)  2015, 7.5 x 9.8, 498 pages, $39.95, $24.99 ebook  An Introduction to Language and Linguistics 2nd Edition (Cambridge)  2014, 7.4 x 9.7, 574 pages, $67.89, $42 ebook  http://www.linguistics.ucla.edu/people/hayes/20/Text/HayesIntroductoryLinguist ics2016.pdf  2016, 8½ x 11, 538 page printable download, Free  created with Word.
  24. 24. $- $100,000.00 $200,000.00 $300,000.00 $400,000.00 $500,000.00 Dollars Dollars
  25. 25. 13577 8202 8535 7397 10662 10270 7338 6069 6574 6979 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 16000 Units U… 10th 11th Ed. 12th Ed. ebooks 38 Amazon 56 Direct
  26. 26. 43% 12% 28% 13% 4% Language Files Journals All other books
  27. 27. Press $120,000 budget shortfall 3 FTEs Linguistics Department $40,000 budget shortfall 1 FTE
  28. 28.  Digital use is much more expensive, sometimes impossible.  Some institutions put a limit on e-usage, either expiration dates or iteration limits.  Cost is two to four times as expensive, if both print and digital are included.  Ebook edition challenges  10th edition files were unusable for 11th because it was outsourced on proprietary software  11th edition files were reusable but required massive amounts of work for the creation of the 12th edition.  12th edition created with xml so could be repurposed as an ebook.  All images needed to be rechecked for digital rights. Most university rights holders extended to ebook, 19 rights holders didn’t.Those images were created.  Permissioning process took six months and three people.
  29. 29. 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 2012 Fiscal 2013 Fiscal 2014 Fiscal 2015 Fiscal 2016 Fiscal 2017 Fiscal Licensing Revenue Licensing Revenue
  30. 30.  January 18th, 2017, Pearson’s stock plunged 28%. It is now half of what it was in 2013. Courseware represent a little over 1/3 of their total business, with assessments and other services making up the rest.  In a 2013 presentaion at the George Washington Conference on Ethics and Publishing, Dr. Al Greco, Professor of Marketing at Fordham who specializes in the textbook market, predicted that the market for print textbooks would go from a $4 Billion market in 2012 to $173 million by 2017, about a 95% decline.  Is the market already adapting?  Amazon’s Rental and Used marketplace  Amazon has been selling more HE textbooks than all physical stores combined since 2012  Inclusive access model
  31. 31.  Georgetown University Press  Foreign Languages, especially Arabic  Penn State Press  Pennsylvania: A History of the Commonwealth  The Holy Teaching of Vimalakīrti: A Mahāyāna Scripture Trans. Robert A. F.Thurman  University of Chicago  Manual of Style  Oxford University Press  Recent author phone calls  University of Toronto Press  Of the 17 subject catalogs they offer, 12 feature only textbooks.
  32. 32. Teri Oaks Gallaway LOUIS: The Louisiana Library Network Interim Executive Director
  33. 33. Social Justice Flipped Pedagogy Personalization, Customization Library role in student success Cost…
  34. 34. Statewide Faculty Survey What level of priority would you place on reducing the cost of textbooks for your courses? N=495 98% Somewhat of a priority or greater
  35. 35.  “The maximum is $100 per course in a semester ideally. For books that span two semesters, $200 is acceptable. Regardless, many students are under great financial strain, particularly at the smaller public schools. Reducing the cost below $100 is really (n)eeded.”
  36. 36. Promote and expose Open Educational Resources (OER) Support Curriculum Driven Acquisitions (CDA) of eBooks and eTextbooks
  37. 37. Nearly 40% not at all familiar n=496
  38. 38. Less than 5% who know what they are oppose n=290
  39. 39. Are you aware of any colleagues that have implemented an OA e- textbook or OER in their courses? N=494 ; 12.1 % yes Have you received requests from your administration, department, or students to integrate OA or OER resources into your curriculum? N=493 ; 8.3% yes Are you aware of any support on your campus to identify or integrate OA or OER resources into courses that you teach? N=487 ; 11.5% yes
  40. 40.  Education, Class, Workshop or Training 35.65%  List of Resources; Discovery Improvements 23.26%  Relevant content 11.78%  Assurance of Quality 10.88%  Administrative Support or Directive 7.25%  Supplemental Teaching Resources 6.95%  Demonstrate Ease of Use 4.83%  Evidence of Peer Usage/Support 4.23%  Course Release/Time 3.93%
  41. 41.  Collaborating with faculty on the selection of OER or purchase of materials within library collections that are appropriate for course adoptions  Curating localized collections of Open Education Resources and Open Access scholarly content  Designing and supporting discovery systems and institutional repositories that enable seamless location and delivery of educational content  Delivering educational programming to faculty and educational technology professionals on tenants of scholarly licensing including Creative Commons principles  Developing professional competencies for new roles as advocates for affordability and leaders on their campuses  Advocating for institutional policies that support Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data
  42. 42. High rate of return for small investments Requires institutional change and support  Faculty Stipends for Adopters  Focus on Textbooks  Open Textbook Network (OTN) Program – 9 cohorts, 58 participants, 18 workshops, 120+ stipends, ~40% adoption rate.  OTN Align-a-thon – common course articulations  Leverage existing technology and human infrastructure – addressing “if I build it problem…”  Support content expert groups – English, Math, Science, History  Community of practice  Small changes = big successes, set realistic expectations
  43. 43.  Academic Freedom – rewards vs. mandates  Bookstore partnerships  Prioritize people over technology  Stable funding or business model  Creation ($$$$$) over adoption ($)  Visibility
  44. 44. Creation  to  Classroom:  an   OER  Journey  from  Production   to  Adoption Kelly  Broughton Ohio  University  Libraries broughtk@ohio.edu
  45. 45. Alt-­Textbook  Initiative   www.ohio.edu/library/alt-­text 2015-­2016  Program 26  instructors  saved 2358  students $236,213
  46. 46. Biggest  Faculty  Hurdles • TIME  /  PRIORITIES  /  INERTIA • Lack  of  knowledge  about  what  is   available • Lack  of  supplemental  material   integration  (problem  sets,  quizzes,  etc.)  
  47. 47. Questions? O Leila Salisbury lsalisbury@uky.edu O Tony Sanfilippo sanfilippo.16@osu.edu O Teri Oaks Gallaway terig@lsu.edu O Kelly Broughton broughtk@ohio.edu O Gwen Evans gwen@ohiolink.edu

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