Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015:
what adults told us
This slide deck sets out what adults1
told us about childr...
Background
 Each year Ofsted uses online questionnaires to gather views about
children’s homes, secure children’s homes, ...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us
How we use the information
 We use the responses, along w...
23,468 adults told us what was good and what could be
better about children’s homes, fostering services and
adoption servi...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 5
Communication
and influence
 Common themes of improving communication included:
 giving adults more opportunity to provide their views and suggest a...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 8
Getting the right information at the right time matters ...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 9
Foster carers and foster children want more information ...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 10
Those who aren’t part of the staff team would like more...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 11
What staff and panel members say would improve communic...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 12
What independent reviewing officers and placing social ...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 13
What parents of children who live in children’s homes/v...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 14
What foster carers say would improve communication
Shar...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 15
What adopters or prospective adopters say would improve...
Environment and
facilities in
children’s homes
Professionals and parents wanted:
updated decorations and furnishings, and regular repairs and maintenance to be
carried ...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 18
What adults say would improve the children’s home envir...
Recruitment and
retention of staff
and recruitment of
foster carers and
adopters
Most adults wanted:
better retention of good and/or experienced staff
more consistent staff teams and fewer staff change...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 21
What adults say would improve the recruitment and reten...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 22
What adults say would improve the recruitment and reten...
They wanted:
recruitment of more foster carers and foster carers who can meet the needs of
particular groups of children,...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 24
What adults say would improve the recruitment of foster...
They wanted:
recruitment of more adopters and more adopters who are able to adopt harder to place
children, such as those...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 26
What adults say would improve the recruitment of adopte...
Training for
professionals,
foster carers and
adopters
Most groups of adults wanted:
More training to be provided and on a more regular basis, for it to be varied and updated
a...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 29
What adults say would improve training
More team traini...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 30
What adults say would improve training (continued)
It c...
Activities for
children and
young people
Professionals and parents wanted:
more – and a greater variety of – activities, both inside and outside the child’s home;...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 33
What adults say would improve activities for children a...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 34
What adults say would improve activities for children l...
Provision of support
for children, young
people, foster
carers and adopters
Most adults want:
more support to prepare for independence (for children living in or visiting children’s
homes or foster...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 37
What adults say would improve support for children
Prov...
Professionals and foster carers wanted:
more support, understanding and listening to foster carers
better out-of-hours s...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 39
What adults say could improve support for foster carers...
Professionals and adopters wanted:
more support and specialist support that relates to the adopted child
ongoing support...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 41
What adults say would improve the support for adopters
...
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 42
What adults say would improve the support for adopters ...
 Independent reviewing officer (IRO): The IRO’s primary focus is to quality
assure the care planning and review process f...
Ofsted on the web and on social
media
www.gov.uk/ofsted
https://uk.linkedin.com/company/ofsted
@Ofstednews
www.slideshare....
Footnotes
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 46
Slide 1
1. For children’s homes, this include...
Footnotes
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 47
Slide 2
5. In relation to children’s homes an...
Footnotes
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 48
Slide 3
9. To protect individuals’ anonymity,...
Footnotes
Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 49
Slide 28
13. This included training for all p...
What adults told us were areas for improvement for children’s homes, fostering services and adoption services
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

What adults told us were areas for improvement for children’s homes, fostering services and adoption services

5,922 views

Published on

Each year Ofsted asks children and young people, parents, carers, foster carers, adopters, staff and other professionals for their views about children’s social care services.

For the 2015 questionnaires there are two slide presentations and a spreadsheet with the numbers of responses to the questions.
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/social-care-questionnaires-2015-what-children-young-people-and-adults-told-ofsted

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
  • How can I improve my memory before an exam? How can I improve my study skills? learn more... ●●● https://tinyurl.com/brainpill101
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Earn $500 for taking a 1 hour paid survey! read more... ■■■ https://tinyurl.com/realmoneystreams2019
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • I went from getting $3 surveys to $500 surveys every day!! learn more... ●●● https://tinyurl.com/make2793amonth
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Forget about surgery, pills and weights, they DONT work! This DOES work, but you need to follow the methods contained in the guide. Let's be honest, penis size is an important aspect of any man's life whether they want to admit it or not. The market is flooded with products and solutions that claim to have the answer to making your member bigger, but usually these products fail to deliver. Luckily, I happened to come across what might be the "Holy Grail of Penis Enlargement", it's written by this guy named John Collins and it's called the Penis Enlargement Bible. What I found mind blowing about John's program is that he backs up his claims with actual video proof and testimonials from customers who have used the product. It's said that a picture is worth a thousand words, but I would say most of these videos are worth 3 to 4 inches! Forget extenders, pills, suction devices and surgery. They are either expensive, too painful or they just don't work. The Penis Enlargement Bible is a proven two step program that combines natural over the counter supplements with a specially designed exercise regime to achieve up to 4" of growth within just a few months. If you are serious about getting bigger, check out the Penis Enlargement Bible here ★★★ http://ishbv.com/pebible/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Your opinions matter! get paid BIG $$$ for them! START NOW!!.. ▲▲▲ http://ishbv.com/surveys6/pdf
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here

What adults told us were areas for improvement for children’s homes, fostering services and adoption services

  1. 1. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us This slide deck sets out what adults1 told us about children’s homes2 , fostering services3 and adoption services4 . You can find out what children and young people told us in the accompanying slide deck.
  2. 2. Background  Each year Ofsted uses online questionnaires to gather views about children’s homes, secure children’s homes, adoption services5 , fostering services6 and residential family centres7,8 .  The questionnaires are for children and young people, parents, staff, social workers and other professionals, such as independent reviewing officers.  These questionnaires ran from 4 February to 9 May 2015 and received responses from 27,715 individuals. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 2
  3. 3. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us How we use the information  We use the responses, along with other information we have, such as previous inspection findings or any concerns, to decide when to inspect and what to focus on when we do.  We share response summaries with providers and local authorities to help them identify areas for improvement9 . We want the sector to know about the issues that were important to children and adults. So this year, we have published a data release and produced this presentation. 3
  4. 4. 23,468 adults told us what was good and what could be better about children’s homes, fostering services and adoption services.10 The following slides focus on areas that adults said could be improved. The six common themes for improvement were. communication and influence environment and facilities in a children’s home recruitment and retention of staff and recruitment of foster carers and adopters training for professionals, foster carers and adopters activities for children and young people provision of support for children and young people, foster carers and adopters. What adults told us could be better about children’s social care services Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 4
  5. 5. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 5
  6. 6. Communication and influence
  7. 7.  Common themes of improving communication included:  giving adults more opportunity to provide their views and suggest areas for improvement to the children’s home, fostering service or adoption service  more regular and consistent communication between all teams involved with the children, including:  with adopters and prospective adopters  with parents of children in children’s homes or being cared for by foster carers, such as updates on what their child has been doing, if they’re ill or about changes to staff  more up-to-date information about incidents involving children  Foster carers specifically want improved information-sharing between themselves and the fostering service or adoption agency, particularly in relation to information about their foster children. They want to be treated as professionals and to be able to share their views and inform decisions about their foster children. All groups of adults say there could be improvements with communication or opportunities to have an influence Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 7
  8. 8. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 8 Getting the right information at the right time matters to everyone involved with children These charts show some of the responses to the statement ‘communication is effective’11 Mostly, people get this right but communication could still be improved
  9. 9. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 9 Foster carers and foster children want more information about each other before they live with each other 60% 40% Strongly agree/agree Disagree/ strongly disagree Foster carer (5,303 responses) I was able to find out lots of useful things about my foster child before he or she moved in or started coming to my home for a short break. 60% 40% 54% 46% Yes No Yes No I was able to find out lots of useful things about the children’s home / fostering family before I moved in with them or had a short break.   Children’s home (1,130 responses) 54% 46% 71% 29% Fostering (1,215 responses)
  10. 10. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 10 Those who aren’t part of the staff team would like more opportunity to share their views
  11. 11. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 11 What staff and panel members say would improve communication More time for team meetings and discussion would promote consistency throughout the team. Shift patterns make this difficult but I do think the rota should incorporate more team time, which would lead to better communication; therefore outcomes for the YP. Communication is always something that benefits from being frequently reviewed, because it is easy for individuals and groups to make assumptions that everyone is involved and knows what they need to. At times, communication between staff isn't being met to a high standard and this can make it difficult for carers to work effectively with one another. Could be a better way of communicating information and changes, and also consult more with staff before implementing changes. To also consider more openly staff ideas on working differently, e.g. having a duty system.
  12. 12. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 12 What independent reviewing officers and placing social workers say would improve communication I would like to receive regular updates on how my looked after child is doing in placement, appointments etc. A lot of families and professionals have had problems contacting the unit by phone and new contact numbers have not been well communicated. There have been a lot of new staff and I think families, the young people and other professionals would have been pleased to receive a picture, name and brief pen picture of each of them.
  13. 13. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 13 What parents of children who live in children’s homes/visit them for short breaks say would improve communication I would like to be informed when staff leave so I don't keep talking about the person and promising my child that he will see the member of staff on his next visit. In an ideal world I would like a text or similar daily to know what she has been up to - because she lives so far away from home, I feel that I miss out on a lot of her life. Also there have recently been a lot of staff changes in the unit she lives in and it would be good to be kept informed of these.
  14. 14. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 14 What foster carers say would improve communication Share information about the young people, we often feel that we are not given the full picture. Sometimes treat their foster carers a little better as sometimes you do feel you are the last to be told about decisions made. Involve us more. Listen more and take on board what we have to say. Listening and respecting the opinion of the foster carer who knows the children best needs to have a stronger voice as part of the any discussions on the children's future. I would like to be treated as part of the team involved in decisions and care for the children I foster. I always feel like I'm just the babysitter.
  15. 15. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 15 What adopters or prospective adopters say would improve communication It doesn't feel like the social workers at each stage of the process communicate with each other. It felt like the goal posts were changing as I went through the process when, had things been made clearer from the outset, it would have been easier and more straightforward. A little more communication through to approval panel would be better. It feels like a very lonely journey up until that point as you do not really know what's going on behind the scenes, so a little weekly we have not forgotten you email would help I think. Communicate better with us - maybe a monthly email update to let us know how the process is going on. We have gone for several months at a time with no communication from the agency and it feels as though we have been forgotten.
  16. 16. Environment and facilities in children’s homes
  17. 17. Professionals and parents wanted: updated decorations and furnishings, and regular repairs and maintenance to be carried out improved outdoor space and more toys or games that can be used outside equipment and toys for children that reflect their age and needs better technology – for example, more up-to-date computers or touch screen computers for children with communication needs a sensory room or more sensory equipment (for homes where disabled children live or attend short breaks) more reliable and suitable vehicles (including those adapted to transport wheelchairs where needed) so that children can be taken to activities and on trips more often. Children’s homes could be ‘more homely’ and better equipped Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 17
  18. 18. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 18 What adults say would improve the children’s home environment and facilities Although staff do their best… this is difficult given the limitations of the building… Perhaps children should be consulted about this and suggest ideas as to how to improve the environment... (Professional) The grounds could be nicer - there are fields and outdoor spaces where some flowers or shrubs would make the situation more homelike and attractive. (Parent) Technological advancement within the home has fallen behind the times. It would be beneficial … to investigate adaptive technologies and update some outdated equipment. (Professional) Activities outside of the unit could be more varied but these are restricted by the lack of group transport. (Professional)
  19. 19. Recruitment and retention of staff and recruitment of foster carers and adopters
  20. 20. Most adults wanted: better retention of good and/or experienced staff more consistent staff teams and fewer staff changes more permanent staff and less reliance on agency staff (although there were some calls for pools of bank staff who could be called on to cover staff illness, holidays, unplanned absences, etc.) higher staffing levels, so that more children can be taken on activities or so there is more support for challenging children; for adoption and fostering services, an increase in staff would mean more support for to foster carers and adopters better recruitment of staff who have the necessary qualifications, skills and experience for their role – for example that the skills of staff recruited for a children’s home reflect the children they are caring for. Getting the right staff and keeping them is very important12 Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 20
  21. 21. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 21 What adults say would improve the recruitment and retention of staff More consistency in staff members being available when child has formed good bonds and trust. (Professional) Staffing can be an issue and children's placements can get cancelled at the last minute leaving children upset and unsure of their routines. (Professional) Have more staff to manage the current workload, so what we do can be improved on - more time for training, more time for reviewing our processes and practice. (Professional)
  22. 22. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 22 What adults say would improve the recruitment and retention of staff (continued) We have had 3 different support workers in 6 months and will have yet another one at the end of this month, due to using bank staff. We have found this very difficult and it means we have support workers who don't really know us or our child and who haven't been on the adoption journey with us. (Adopter or prospective adopter) The home could inform applicants at interview, just how challenging the young people they will be working with are. I feel this could in some cases help to stop a high turn over of staff, which would provide stability for our young people. (Professional)
  23. 23. They wanted: recruitment of more foster carers and foster carers who can meet the needs of particular groups of children, for example children with complex needs, sibling groups or older children. recruitment of more ethnically diverse foster carers. Fostering professionals want more foster carers who meet specific needs Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 23
  24. 24. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 24 What adults say would improve the recruitment of foster carers Being able to recruit more foster carers with the appropriate skills to meet the needs of very complex children is a key area for the agency to continually address. (Professional) Targeted recruitment for carers who can meet the needs of children with additional or more specific needs and challenging older children and young people. (Professional Explore further ways of informing the general public about fostering as there is an acute shortage of foster carers to meet the demand. (Professional)
  25. 25. They wanted: recruitment of more adopters and more adopters who are able to adopt harder to place children, such as those with complex needs, sibling groups or older children recruitment of ethnically diverse adopters promotion of the adoption service more effectively to increase awareness amongst potential adopters and consider innovative ways to try and recruit more adopters. Adoption professionals want more adopters who can meet specific needs Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 25
  26. 26. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 26 What adults say would improve the recruitment of adopters I feel the agency could do more to promote themselves, locally and nationally. I am aware that other neighbouring local authority adoption agencies place adverts/have events to promote themselves. (Professional) The majority of children who wait seem to have very complex needs which most typical adopters aren't equipped to deal with. People considering adoption should be made aware of this national situation, and educated in the special medical/emotional issues the majority of children have so they know earlier on whether they can manage this before they even start. (Adopter / prospective adopter)
  27. 27. Training for professionals, foster carers and adopters
  28. 28. Most groups of adults wanted: More training to be provided and on a more regular basis, for it to be varied and updated and to be provided by external sources. Specialist training that reflected the specific needs of the children for foster carers, children’s home staff and adopters. More career progression opportunities and training that leads to formal qualifications for staff. Training for foster carers and adopters to be offered at more flexible and convenient times, for example, during evenings and weekends and for training to be provided at locations closer to where individuals live. Foster carers to have the option to complete some training online. Better training13 would make a difference to children and young people Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 28
  29. 29. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 29 What adults say would improve training More team training and building, so that we are all hearing the same thing at the same time and enabling us to make a more unified approach to some situations. (Professional) More training for foster carers especially for the second carer who often works outside the home as so is not available for the training presently provided. More weekend & evening training opportunities are required. (Professional) I strongly feel that the agency should invest in training and professional development opportunities for all teams rather than just for social work/management roles. (Professional)
  30. 30. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 30 What adults say would improve training (continued) It can be some months before the initial training and placement and some kind of refresher training would be good... (Adopter or prospective adopter) Ensure that there is more advanced training on offer in order to help work with the more complex placements that are coming through. (Foster carer) Ensure that training is more targeted, especially carers’ who have been foster carers’ for a long time and may have become complacent with how to deal with all children and their needs. (Professional)
  31. 31. Activities for children and young people
  32. 32. Professionals and parents wanted: more – and a greater variety of – activities, both inside and outside the child’s home; more organised events where children living with foster carers could meet with other foster children more activities that all children can take part in or activities that children and staff or foster carers can do together more day trips and holidays for children greater encouragement for children to take part in activities more options for children to get involved with the community – for example, attending youth clubs or sports clubs activities that reflect the needs of the children, such as older or disabled children activities to be planned in advance or to be more structured. activities that encourage children to keep fit and healthy. Opportunities and encouragement for children and young people to take part in fun activities is important Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 32
  33. 33. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 33 What adults say would improve activities for children and young people in children’s homes Staff team to be more proactive in terms of suggesting new hobbies, activities to do, promoting healthy eating and healthy lifestyle. Also to research local programmes, voluntary work or programmes that the young people can get involved in. (Professional) I think more activities on offer whilst there. Pre- planned almost so that child knows before going for their break that a certain trip out is organised. (Parent) More outings and activities particularly based on individual interests. (Parent) Be able to access more clubs and hobbies so as the young people have more to entertain themselves and improve their self-esteem. (Professional)
  34. 34. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 34 What adults say would improve activities for children living with or visiting foster carers Where young people choose to not engage or be involved in activities, I would like to feel that more is being done to re- engage them. (Professional) Possible organised residential trips for lac, which we feel would benefit them by socialising with others who can really relate to their emotions. (Foster carer) Provide more culturally sensitive activities to promote children's identity. (fostering service staff or panel member) Do more events for older children so that they can meet other foster children of their own age. (Professional)
  35. 35. Provision of support for children, young people, foster carers and adopters
  36. 36. Most adults want: more support to prepare for independence (for children living in or visiting children’s homes or foster carers) more post-adoption support that can be accessed quickly and easily, and in particular for those children and young people with complex needs (for adopted children). Children and young people need better support Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what did adults tell us? 36
  37. 37. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 37 What adults say would improve support for children Provide school support for every adoptive child. Automatically hold assessment/planning meetings at key stages throughout a child's life so support is always planned and available rather than begged for when a crisis hits. Be more willing to provide 'out of house' support/therapy when the case warrants it. (Adoptive parent) Staff could work with young people to prepare them better for life outside the home, in particular to encourage realistic expectations of life when they move on from the home. (Professional)
  38. 38. Professionals and foster carers wanted: more support, understanding and listening to foster carers better out-of-hours support more opportunities to meet with other foster carers more timely support to avoid placement breakdowns. Good support for foster carers is critical Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 38
  39. 39. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 39 What adults say could improve support for foster carers More understanding of day-to-day strains and practical support offered before it is asked for. (Foster carer) It could give newly qualified carers help to meet up with more experienced carers to gain help and support. (Foster carer) Support carers better in a positive way listening to our opinions about the child or children in our care. (Foster carer) More support for foster carers with difficult placements. (Professional) Support foster carers and their families more. Act quicker when foster carer needs support. (Foster carer)
  40. 40. Professionals and adopters wanted: more support and specialist support that relates to the adopted child ongoing support that can be accessed at any time after adoption more timely support that can be quickly accessed opportunities to meet with other adopters. Good support for adopters is critical Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 40
  41. 41. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 41 What adults say would improve the support for adopters Support for adoptive parents adopting older children 6+. Adopting older children comes with different challenges to those of younger children and I feel there should be more research and specific training provided to cater for this. Many adoptive parents shy away from adopting older children but if we were better educated about the pros and cons and how to overcome the challenges then perhaps more older children would be adopted and not be in long term foster care. (Adopter or prospective adopter) People are frightened to go back to social services as they feel they will be judged etc BUT most children who go onto to be adopted have had very bad experiences in their birth homes and therefore will need more support etc. (Adopter or prospective adopter)
  42. 42. Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 42 What adults say would improve the support for adopters (continued) Opportunities to build ongoing supportive links with other adopters at a similar stage of the process were missed… we do feel that new adopters struggle to form the sort of support network that many new birth families have. (Adopter or prospective adopter) Perhaps speed up the access to post adoption support - from our initial enquiry for support to occurring was 3 months - this may not sound like a long time - but when dealing day in, day out with your child's behaviour, it can feel like a long time. (Adopter or prospective adopter) To give more information regarding support to adopters after they have adopted the children as a lot of adopters feel they are left alone once they have adopted. And it’s usually when the children become a little older that the support is needed. (Professional)
  43. 43.  Independent reviewing officer (IRO): The IRO’s primary focus is to quality assure the care planning and review process for each child and to ensure that his/her current wishes and feelings are given full consideration.  Panel members (adoption and fostering): Legislation requires each fostering or adoption service to appoint people to act as a panel, to review applications and recommend which people should be approved as adopters and foster carers.  Placing social worker: This is the child’s social worker.  Supervising social worker: This is the social worker who supports and supervises foster carers. Glossary Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 43
  44. 44. Ofsted on the web and on social media www.gov.uk/ofsted https://uk.linkedin.com/company/ofsted @Ofstednews www.slideshare.net/Ofstednews Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 45
  45. 45. Footnotes Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 46 Slide 1 1. For children’s homes, this includes: staff; independent reviewing officers and social workers; and parents. For fostering services, this includes: staff and panel members; independent reviewing officers and social workers; parents; and foster carers. For adoption services, this includes: staff and panel members; independent reviewing officers and social workers; people who want to or have adopted; and partner agencies and foster carers. 2. 9,353 adults responded about children’s homes. 3. 9,911 adults responded about fostering services. 4. 4,690 adults responded about adoption services.
  46. 46. Footnotes Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 47 Slide 2 5. In relation to children’s homes and fostering services, the responses from children and about children do not solely relate to children looked after. A significant number of children who are not looked after receive services. For example, children who receive short breaks or are placed under other arrangements. Most users of short breaks are disabled children but non- disabled children in need may also receive short breaks. The breaks usually have two aims: to enable the child to participate in fun, interesting and safe activities and to provide a break for parents. 6. Voluntary adoption agencies and local authority adoption services. 7. Independent fostering agencies and local authority fostering services. 8. Due to a low number of responses to the questionnaires for secure children’s homes and residential family centres, these have not been included in this presentation.
  47. 47. Footnotes Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 48 Slide 3 9. To protect individuals’ anonymity, the summaries only include quantitative data and only where there are 10 or more responses. Slide 4 10. Not all audience types were asked this question. For children’s homes we asked: staff; independent reviewing officers and social workers; and parents. For fostering services we asked: staff and panel members; independent reviewing officers and placing social workers; parents; and foster carers. For adoption services we asked: staff and panel members; independent reviewing officers and placing social workers; people who want to or have adopted; and partner agencies and foster carers. Slide 8 11. The percentages for all questions in this slide deck do not include the ‘not applicable’ responses or those that didn’t answer the question. Slide 20 12. This included staff in children’s homes, adoption agencies and fostering services.
  48. 48. Footnotes Children’s social care questionnaires 2015: what adults told us 49 Slide 28 13. This included training for all professionals and foster carers and adopters.

×