THE NEW NORM: WORKPLACE ONE
<ul><li>A collection of  observations  on the industry today </li></ul><ul><li>A  sharing of knowledge  and ideas </li></u...
8 TRENDS THAT REALLY MATTER
1. SHRINKING WORKSTATIONS Is this my space ?
THE PERFECT STORM LOWER  PANELS (LEED) INCREASED COLLABORATION LESS EXPENSIVE WORKSTATIONS LESS INDIVIDUAL SPACE
MAKING MORE OUT OF SMALLER SPACES STEP 3: Provide sufficient worksurface and storage  STEP 1: Create a sense of personal s...
2.  WORKING OUTSIDE THE BOX
WHERE IS EVERYONE? <ul><li>We’re away from our desks  62% of the time </li></ul><ul><li>What are we doing? </li></ul><ul><...
3. WE’VE BECOME    CORPORATE NOMADS
RESEARCH SHOWS <ul><li>“ 29%  of companies  are considering flexible work options to reduce costs, increase productivity a...
MANAGING FLUCTUATIONS <ul><li>Solutions include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>desk sharing  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>work-at-ho...
…BUT WE NEED TO LAND <ul><li>“ It’s hard to imagine a CEO going to the board with the news that he has targeted  plant uti...
…Ask yourself  <ul><li>Would you rather have a office that was 2 feet bigger or a blackberry ? </li></ul>
IF 40% ADOPTED A MOBILE STRATEGY <ul><li>“ In 10 years, the U.S. could  save  </li></ul><ul><li>1.2 billion metric tons of...
4. MULTI-GENERATIONS   IN ONE WORKPLACE
WHAT GENERATION ARE YOU? Traditional (1928 -1945) Boomers (1946 - 1964) Generation X (1965 - 1980) Millenials (1981 - 1991)
GENERATIONAL PREFERENCES
HOW DO WE MAKE IT WORK FOR EVERYONE What doesn’t work ?  A regimented, cookie-cutter approach. What does work  ? A balance...
<ul><li>COLLABORATION HAPPENS  EVERYWHERE </li></ul>
WHY ARE WE SEEKING GREATER COLLABORATION ? <ul><li>High performance organizations increasingly emphasize collaboration and...
SURVEYS SHOW <ul><li>“ Success in a knowledge economy requires a workplace defined by varied and dynamic interactions.” </...
COLLABORATION CHALLENGES <ul><li>Generational issues </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Natural for younger generations </li></...
COLLABORATION CHALLENGES <ul><li>Must be ad-hoc </li></ul><ul><li>“ Lets meet at 4:00 to be creative and collaborate” </li...
6.  WE VALUE A VIEW 6.  A WORKSTATION WITH A VIEW
DAYLIGHT INCREASES PRODUCTIVITY <ul><li>The facts ! </li></ul><ul><li>Students achieved  25% higher grades  on standardize...
A WORKPLACE WITH A VIEW <ul><li>Lower panel heights and elevated furniture </li></ul><ul><li>Glass architectural walls  </...
<ul><li>SPACE IS DEFINED BY WORKSTYLE NOT STATUS </li></ul>
IS THE CORNER OFFICE REALLY DESIRABLE ? <ul><li>“ In the 1960s, IBM copy machine  and typewriter service men had to wear s...
A CLOSED DOOR IS NO LONGER A PERK <ul><li>Younger workers used to multiple stimuli  </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t need clearly d...
8. GREEN    ENVIRONMENTS
ARE WE “GREEN” YET? <ul><li>Our environmental practices regarding facilities, processes, design, packaging and transportat...
A BIG CHALLENGE
TEN PLANNING STYLES TO ADDRESS TODAY’S TRENDS
EXAMPLE:
OLD EQUATION: X  X  (Y 1   +  Y 2 )  =  Z
OLD EQUATION AT WORK: private offices amenities open plan meeting rooms
NEW: A  X  (B 1   +  B 2   +  B 3   +  B 4 )  +  S  =  Z
NEW FORMULA AT WORK:
NEW FORMULA AT WORK: learning + sharing collaboration lounges leadership teams heavy computing quiet zone shared address p...
uniformity individual ownership complacency individual diversity cross-functional team flows interactive environment mobil...
MIXED PLAN, HEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS
LOUNGE
RESIDENT WORKERS
LEADERSHIP TEAMS
TOUCHDOWN SPACES
LEARNING & SHARING
COLLABORATION
ENCLAVES
QUIET ZONES
HEAVY COMPUTING
PERSONAL AMENITIES
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Workplace One- Teknion Presentation (Office Revolution)

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Teknion's Workplace One Presentation

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  • We are not a research company – and we are not attempting to predict the future…. That’s not what workplace one is about WE WANT TO HAVE THE DIALOGUE WITH OUR CLIENTS… what a missed opportunity it is to have a conversation passing whitepapers back and forth… we created tools to help you have that dialogue
  • When does a trend become more than a trend and actually STICK -Increases profit ( increased productivity or lower cost) -New technologies example 1 : the switch from CRT screens to flat screens all of a sudden made us more collaborative ???? It allowed us to re-orient our workstations , providing greater collaboration example 2 : Article in the London Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/news/6078219/Blackberry-users-work-an-extra-15-hours-a-week-out-of-the-office.html) found that an employee on a blackberry works an additional 15 hours more a week) -Government legislation (Often time government legislation has more of an effect on a trends than profit drivers or new technologies) Example 1 – How has LEED effected planning ? Example 2 – Fuel efficiency. If you review the changes in MPG of passenger automobiles from 1973 to 2009. the greatest increase in efficiency came in the late seventies (not as result of fuel prices or new technologies.. Greater advancements have occurred since) it came as a direct result of government legislation (CAFÉ standard)
  • In the last 10 years the size of a workstation has decreased by 40% To put that in perspective – the average home in the United States is 2,000 sqft , imagine moving to a 1,200sqft loft, But just like an office having the same amount of “stuff” The trend has been even less friendly to managers who not only lost there walls and doors, there workspaces have shrunk 45% Source (internal Teknion evaluation of furniture standards over a 10 year span 1999 - 2009)
  • The migration of people from private, closed-door offices to workstations providing standing-height privacy took more than a decade. But in only a few short years, we have seen a shift from 66” height to 42” height workstations. The change has been significant --- WHY ?
  • Any radical shift creates challenges. The answer is not to take standard cubicles and lower the height, its an opportunity for change - the goal is to make more out of small spaces
  • People increasingly work in places other than their office or cubicle. A case study prepared by Hewlett- Packard and a major office furniture manufacturer, HOW MUCH TIME DO YOU THINK AN AVERAGE WORKER SPENDS IN THERE OFFICE IN AN AVERAGE DAY ?
  • There is a new understanding that people move around at work and they are more productive when they do. It used to be a negative “ Joe is never at his desk”.. That has changed with this new knowledge Hewlett Packard change there GOAL IS TO CREATE MORE PUBLIC SPACES. The conclusion? HP workers were utilizing dedicated space only 38% of the time, a number that led HP to reconfigure the facility and to use offices and meeting rooms differently. Now utilization averages 50% and at times reaches 90%.
  • So we are learning that people aren&apos;t actually in their workstations as much as we thought.. We are also learning that people aren&apos;t actually in the office as much as we thought either
  • Recent surveys indicate that 29% of companies are considering a mobile work strategy or more flexible work options in order to reduce costs, increase productivity and help reduce employee stress. Several states including Oklahoma and Kentucky have instituted mobile work programs to help employees with rising gas costs Workers want it 43% would change to a job with greater mobility 33% would prefer mobility over a 10% wage increase What “mobility” offer employeers Greater productivity research has shown that employers that offer flexible work options see higher workforce productivity as a result. Employees actually work longer hours when they telework because they work during some of the time they would have spent commuting. Such hard data should counter management fears that offsite employees aren&apos;t pulling their fair share of the load. They are, and then some. Higher job satisfaction and retention Another thing employees do with the time they no longer spend commuting is rest and recharge. This quality downtime contributes to the higher levels of job satisfaction reported by those who work a flexible schedule of their own devising, which in turn drives greater retention rates. Also, employees with long commutes who might have thought to look for a job closer to home will be more inclined to stay with their current employer if they can cut their gas bill. A boost to recruitment Flexible work schedules boost recruitment as well as retention. An employee considering two similar job offers is likely to opt for the one with flextime built in. This is especially true today given how slumping home values make relocation more risky. Reduced overhead Compressed work weeks and increased telecommuting save on utilities. For years now, many private sector consulting and high tech firms, such as IBM, Deloitte, and Accenture, have moved to a &amp;quot;mobile workforce,&amp;quot; in which a large portion of core employees work primarily from home or at the customer as a way to save on office space and costs. Benefits beyond the organization Increasing the portion of the labor force that pays less for gas, and works longer by saving on commuting time, gives the sluggish U.S. economy a productivity boost, without spending an additional stimulus dollar. (http://blogs.harvardbusiness.org/cs/2008/07/high_gas_prices_a_plus_for_emp.html)
  • For most people some of the only thoughtful time we get to think about work is at home. Some interesting facts . Researchers studying a random sample of office workers and found they got an average of just 11 minutes clear time to a project before being distracted by an e-mail, phone call or verbal interruption from a manager or colleague. It also found interruptions now took up an average of 2.1 hours of every working day, or 28 per cent of the average person&apos;s nine-to-five schedule, It took an average of 25 minutes to thoughtfully re-immerse ourselves in a task after being disturbed …” working from home is becoming a necessity ( Original URL: http://www.management-issues.com/2006/8/24/research/workers-interrupted-every-11-minutes.asp?)
  • Manufacturing works best when it its at full capacity, it experiences the best economies of scale, quality always improves, and it costs less to make things…Downtime kills a manufacturing facility….. Why should offices be any different?
  • An environmental fact that this cannot be ignored. Many believe that the green economy is what is going to drive us into the future The Obama administration has set the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions 80 percent by 2050 and introduced the possibility of environmental legislation to control and offset emissions. No doubt commute times will become a part of this difficult equation Set aside the “environment” for a second and just consider the cost of a commute according to the the U.S. Census Bureau and the International Facility Management Association. • Average commuter = 24.4 miles at $.55 a mile = $13.42 each way per driver for al total of $6,722.50 annually; • Add in the average parking cost per car of $2,880 annually; • Add lost production time of 250 hours spent on the road at the average hourly rate of $24.25 (based on the national average income of $50,233.00) = $6,037.62. Then add in the cost for real estate: • Average square feet per person is 200 x average rent of $30 per RSF + average operating cost of $10 per RSF = $8,000 annually; • Plus the average cost of furniture and IT per employee of $5,000 annually.
  • First time in history we have 4 generations working together
  • How do generations get divided ? Take a second to figure out where you fit in
  • This is a hot topic, there have been a ton of books written on the topic…. But the best summary I have seen is the chart.. Create by the Carrol Thatcher group… it looks at 6 topics and reviews have each generation views them /(as being of high importance or low importance 1. Desire for colour variety 2. Need for ergonomics 3. Want corner office with window, 4. Noise tolerance 5. Expect professional attire 6. Expect supplementary amenities
  • One of the best quotes I heard on collaboration is “ I want collaboration to be by design, not chance ” When it comes to COLLABORATION the built environment REALLY effects behavior
  • Cause it works - Science really can’t answer that. Participants did say that overheard conversations often brought them valuable information that helped them finish their work faster.
  • Must be designed in
  • “These people may already have been global collaborators at school or at home. They embrace technology more readily than many of their predecessors. And they are generally more mobile, contributing to a rapid growth in the numbers of people working outside conventional office settings.” However, collaboration is a less familiar work mode for many Boomers and Traditionals bred to see creativity as a solo act
  • How important is sunlight to mental and physical health? It seems an obvious answer all living things require sunlight Accepting this truth isn’t the challenge – planning for it is
  • Of all the trends we looked into more research as been done on the effects of daylights and views than another. What is interesting is that they researched schools, retails environments and offices…. All with the same results
  • LEED for Commercial Interiors guidelines also stress access to daylight and views. Windows and skylights create a connection to nature and can also be part of energy-efficient design strategies. Lower height and elevated furniture, glass architectural walls and the use of lighter colors and surface treatments that reflect light, can all make the most of available natural light while reaping the benefits of lower energy costs and enhanced employee productivity.
  • Planners are thinking about work style and not title when dividing up space The symbol of status has always been the corner office with the window and the wood office suite… that has been declining
  • Formal (and constrictive) dress and a formal executive office are simply not as relevant in the modern workplace. Also loks at the social aspects of change This trend away from the private office as a signal of the organizational hierarchy and individual status presents a challenge in that it reflects a systemic change in attitudes and behaviors mirrored in process and structure. Again, balance and choice – appropriate variability – are desirable features of a workplace where sharing, connecting and building on ideas are more characteristic than top-down directives.
  • Its not just about generations CEO excess Executive bonus Wall streets effect on main street have really created a new management culture
  • No longer about stackability, off-modularity, cable management.. This is just expected !!!! The big question, and a proper concern, is a manufacturer’s approach to sustainable development. Customers ask questions about how companies are reducing their environmental footprint through facilities and processes, as well as design and packaging and transportation. They want products that can help create healthy work environments and minimize environmental impact. In the near future, if a company cannot document how its operations and products affect the environment – and the steps being taken to reduce that impact – it will not be able to maintain market position or make it through the RFP process. Government agencies, as well as the architecture and design community, are focusing on greening the office environment. Designers and facilities managers are choosing to specify green products and to work with suppliers who have significant environmental initiatives in place. Green has made the shift from a “peripheral movement.”
  • This is why we created workplace one…. Sharing our observations on the changes in the office and So what workplaceone is is 10 planning styles that satisfy the needs of the modern workplace…. Its not our view of the future.. Some clients will see
  • 20,000 square ft office tower All exterior windows
  • How does all of the above impact planning for the workplace? The old approach to planning decisions was fairly simple. Using an algebraic terms to stand for the factors involved in a proper planning decision, the Old Equation looks like this:
  • The new workplace planning equation takes into account multiple factors that contribute to the healthy, mixed planning environments required today. New Equation Negatives
  • WorkplaceOne is a substantial; shift in office thinking
  • Lounge. A multiuse space that may be comprised of a concierge desk, café, meeting zones and business center, the lounge replaces conventional reception areas, inviting guests to participate in the corporate culture as soon as they enter the office. The lounge reflects a new emphasis on social aspects of work and the connections among people based on affinity and trust, relational values fundamental to collaboration.
  • Resident. While work at the computer remains a constant, resident workers also switch gears for meetings and impromptu collaboration, spending less time at their workstations than formerly— and requiring less space for dedicated individual work. The new workstation— more compact, more open, more efficient— reflects today’s interactive workstyles, LEED guidelines and the different needs of four generations of workers
  • Private office. The private office is designed for those who require an enclosed space in order to work with minimal interruption or distraction. Unlike the traditional executive suite, today’s private office seals out noise, but maintains a sense of approachable leadership, inviting “front stoop” conversations, as well as more formal engagement. Glass walls may be used to create transparency, as well as to admit daylight and maintain access to views.
  • ouchdown/Shared Address. With the advent of wireless technology and a nomadic workforce, touchdown spaces have become essential to effective workplace design, providing stations that permit non-resident workers to connect immediately to digital networks when visiting the office for an hour or several days. Touchdown spaces also provide new storage formats for shared access and personal use.
  • Learning/Sharing. Our modern global knowledge economy demands continuous learning in a variety of formats—teacher directed, discussions among team members and research or interactive learning conducted online. Different environments for learning in the office include training rooms, classrooms and boardrooms, as well as project rooms where people can brainstorm and share information on an informal basis.
  • Collaborative. Collaboration occurs at various sites and at any time of day as people share their knowledge, skills and experience to reach common goals. Recognizing that such interaction is vital to innovation, companies are giving space to open, informal settings throughout the office that invite interaction and provide an outlet for collective creativity.
  • Enclave. While open spaces for collaboration and social engagement are key features of the modern office, enclosure is essential when acoustical privacy is desired. A full-height enclosure accommodates two or three people. Each Enclave can be furnished to support a different workstyle— focused individual work, conference calls and sensitive or confidential conversations.
  • Quiet Zone. Defined by its diversity, today’s workplace is home to four generations who represent many different cultures and values and who require a variety of settings within the open office. This includes spaces that offer privacy and quiet—often in rare supply. Within the Quiet Zone, cell phones are prohibited and each station varies to accommodate diverse workstyle needs and preferences.
  • Heavy computing. For many workers, computing continues to be the primary component of their daily work, requiring an environment that promotes efficiency, effectiveness and healthy work postures. Beyond the ergonomic demand for highly adjustable seating and accessories that keep work within easy reach, planning for these spaces must also address the workers’ desire to create an individual setting and ambiance.
  • Personal Amenities.In the 21st century workplace, no one “owns” anything— everyone owns everything. Workers at all levels share space, views and access to natural light, as well as cafés and amenities such as a room set aside for meditation or a spa for rejuvenation. Such amenities address physical, spiritual and emotional needs, making a difference in how a person feels about his or her workplace and allowing creative potential to be realized.
  • Workplace One- Teknion Presentation (Office Revolution)

    1. 1. THE NEW NORM: WORKPLACE ONE
    2. 2. <ul><li>A collection of observations on the industry today </li></ul><ul><li>A sharing of knowledge and ideas </li></ul><ul><li>An ongoing dialogue with our customers </li></ul>
    3. 3. 8 TRENDS THAT REALLY MATTER
    4. 4. 1. SHRINKING WORKSTATIONS Is this my space ?
    5. 5. THE PERFECT STORM LOWER PANELS (LEED) INCREASED COLLABORATION LESS EXPENSIVE WORKSTATIONS LESS INDIVIDUAL SPACE
    6. 6. MAKING MORE OUT OF SMALLER SPACES STEP 3: Provide sufficient worksurface and storage STEP 1: Create a sense of personal space STEP 2: Make use of every square inch of real estate STEP 4: Maintain a feeling of spaciousness
    7. 7. 2. WORKING OUTSIDE THE BOX
    8. 8. WHERE IS EVERYONE? <ul><li>We’re away from our desks 62% of the time </li></ul><ul><li>What are we doing? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>collaborating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>sharing </li></ul></ul>We are only in our workstations 38% of the time
    9. 9. 3. WE’VE BECOME CORPORATE NOMADS
    10. 10. RESEARCH SHOWS <ul><li>“ 29% of companies are considering flexible work options to reduce costs, increase productivity and help reduce employee stress.” </li></ul>
    11. 11. MANAGING FLUCTUATIONS <ul><li>Solutions include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>desk sharing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>work-at-home programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>mobile working </li></ul></ul>Reservation software systems can make managing fluctuations manageable
    12. 12. …BUT WE NEED TO LAND <ul><li>“ It’s hard to imagine a CEO going to the board with the news that he has targeted plant utilization at 40%!” </li></ul><ul><li>MARK GOLAN, CISCO </li></ul>
    13. 13. …Ask yourself <ul><li>Would you rather have a office that was 2 feet bigger or a blackberry ? </li></ul>
    14. 14. IF 40% ADOPTED A MOBILE STRATEGY <ul><li>“ In 10 years, the U.S. could save </li></ul><ul><li>1.2 billion metric tons of CO2 and 21 Manhattans worth of carbon emissions per year.” </li></ul><ul><li>CORENET 2008 </li></ul>
    15. 15. 4. MULTI-GENERATIONS IN ONE WORKPLACE
    16. 16. WHAT GENERATION ARE YOU? Traditional (1928 -1945) Boomers (1946 - 1964) Generation X (1965 - 1980) Millenials (1981 - 1991)
    17. 17. GENERATIONAL PREFERENCES
    18. 18. HOW DO WE MAKE IT WORK FOR EVERYONE What doesn’t work ? A regimented, cookie-cutter approach. What does work ? A balance between uniformity and giving workers the ability to make choices.
    19. 19. <ul><li>COLLABORATION HAPPENS EVERYWHERE </li></ul>
    20. 20. WHY ARE WE SEEKING GREATER COLLABORATION ? <ul><li>High performance organizations increasingly emphasize collaboration and look for ways to design opportunities for interaction – great ideas don’t necessarily occur when seated at a desk or table. </li></ul>Because it works !
    21. 21. SURVEYS SHOW <ul><li>“ Success in a knowledge economy requires a workplace defined by varied and dynamic interactions.” </li></ul><ul><li>GENSLER 2008 WORKPLACE SURVEY </li></ul>
    22. 22. COLLABORATION CHALLENGES <ul><li>Generational issues </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Natural for younger generations </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Not so natural for boomers </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>
    23. 23. COLLABORATION CHALLENGES <ul><li>Must be ad-hoc </li></ul><ul><li>“ Lets meet at 4:00 to be creative and collaborate” </li></ul><ul><li>If you have to book a room to collaborate the opportunity is lost </li></ul>Planning issue -With-in view (25ft vs. 25 miles)
    24. 24. 6. WE VALUE A VIEW 6. A WORKSTATION WITH A VIEW
    25. 25. DAYLIGHT INCREASES PRODUCTIVITY <ul><li>The facts ! </li></ul><ul><li>Students achieved 25% higher grades on standardized tests </li></ul><ul><li>Retail sales increased per store </li></ul><ul><li>Office workers performed 10% to 25% better on tests of mental function and memory recall </li></ul>
    26. 26. A WORKPLACE WITH A VIEW <ul><li>Lower panel heights and elevated furniture </li></ul><ul><li>Glass architectural walls </li></ul><ul><li>Lighter colors and surface treatments to reflect light and maximize natural light </li></ul>
    27. 27. <ul><li>SPACE IS DEFINED BY WORKSTYLE NOT STATUS </li></ul>
    28. 28. IS THE CORNER OFFICE REALLY DESIRABLE ? <ul><li>“ In the 1960s, IBM copy machine and typewriter service men had to wear suits to elevate the value perception of service. In the 1990s, dress-down Friday has made the enclosed office paneled in mahogany look silly.” </li></ul><ul><li>CARL MAGNUSSON </li></ul>
    29. 29. A CLOSED DOOR IS NO LONGER A PERK <ul><li>Younger workers used to multiple stimuli </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t need clearly defined space </li></ul><ul><li>Executives are seeking more open exchange with employees </li></ul>
    30. 30. 8. GREEN ENVIRONMENTS
    31. 31. ARE WE “GREEN” YET? <ul><li>Our environmental practices regarding facilities, processes, design, packaging and transportation is now part of the RFP </li></ul><ul><li>No longer a ‘peripheral movement’ </li></ul>
    32. 32. A BIG CHALLENGE
    33. 33. TEN PLANNING STYLES TO ADDRESS TODAY’S TRENDS
    34. 34. EXAMPLE:
    35. 35. OLD EQUATION: X X (Y 1 + Y 2 ) = Z
    36. 36. OLD EQUATION AT WORK: private offices amenities open plan meeting rooms
    37. 37. NEW: A X (B 1 + B 2 + B 3 + B 4 ) + S = Z
    38. 38. NEW FORMULA AT WORK:
    39. 39. NEW FORMULA AT WORK: learning + sharing collaboration lounges leadership teams heavy computing quiet zone shared address personal amenities resident enclaves
    40. 40. uniformity individual ownership complacency individual diversity cross-functional team flows interactive environment mobility and choice mentorship and knowledge transfer collaborative linear department flows static environment OLD THINKING NEW THINKING
    41. 41. MIXED PLAN, HEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS
    42. 42. LOUNGE
    43. 43. RESIDENT WORKERS
    44. 44. LEADERSHIP TEAMS
    45. 45. TOUCHDOWN SPACES
    46. 46. LEARNING & SHARING
    47. 47. COLLABORATION
    48. 48. ENCLAVES
    49. 49. QUIET ZONES
    50. 50. HEAVY COMPUTING
    51. 51. PERSONAL AMENITIES

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