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Global Climate Action Summit - Office for Climate Education

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The Global Climate Action Summit will bring leaders and people together from around the world to “Take Ambition to the Next Level.” It will be a moment to celebrate the extraordinary achievements of states, regions, cities, companies, investors and citizens with respect to climate action as the Office for Climate Education initiative.

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Global Climate Action Summit - Office for Climate Education

  1. 1. CLIMATE CHANGE AND EDUCATION THE OFFICE FOR CLIMATE EDUCATION (OCE) PRESENTED DURING THE GLOBAL CLIMATE ACTION SUMMIT SAN FRANCISCO (CALIFORNIA) - SEPTEMBER 11-14 2018 BY PIERRE LENA, EMERITUS PROFESSOR, UNIVERSITE PARIS DIDEROT, FRANCE LYDIE LESCARMONTIER, SCIENCE OFFICER, OCE DAVID WILGENBUS, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER, OCE
  2. 2. SCIENTISTS CARE FOR SCIENCE EDUCATION 1995-2015
  3. 3. 1995-2018 Office for Climate Education June 2018 PILOT PROJECTS IN INQUIRY BASED SCIENCE EDUCATION Bruce ALBERTS Mario MOLINA Georges CHARPAK LEE Yuan Tseh WEI Yu Nobel 1995 Nobel 1986 Nobel 1986 Inquiry Pedagogy primary & secondary school Trained Teachers Active Students
  4. 4. Office for Climate Education 4 large scale pedagogical projects in 10 years 40,000 classes involved (primary and secondary schools) 1 million students Average time spent in each class: 12 hours 14,000 teachers trained High level of satisfaction (> 90%) LA MAIN À PÂTE (FRANCE) 2005-2012 June 2018
  5. 5. A NEW ISSUE: EDUCATION TO CLIMATE CHANGE
  6. 6. Dec. 1995 : Laurent Fabius, President COP21 in Paris, announcing the unanimous vote of 195 countries Paris, December 2015, COP 21
  7. 7. Office for Climate Education ARTICLE 12 Parties shall cooperate in taking measures, as appropriate, to enhance climate change education, training, public awareness, public participation and public access to information, recognizing the importance of these steps with respect to enhancing actions under this Agreement. INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT June 2018 Adopted by IAP 113 Science academies Dec. 2017 UNESCO Sept. 2015 RECOMMENDATION “In parallel with the IPCC periodic Reports, provide resources and Tools for teachers at a global scale, in cooperation with local actors for making the necessary adaptations to the diversity of local situations“
  8. 8. CHALLENGES In a study in 70 countries ― More than 50% of school curricula ignore environment ― More ignore climate change Office for Climate Education June 2018
  9. 9. CHALLENGES Office for Climate Education June 2018
  10. 10. CHALLENGES Office for Climate Education June 2018
  11. 11. A NEW INITIATIVE IN 2018 THE OFFICE FOR CLIMATE EDUCATION
  12. 12. 2018 - 2023 AN OFFICE FOR CLIMATE EDUCATION EXECUTIVE SECRETARIAT IN PARIS + GLOBAL NETWORK FOR CLIMATE EDUCATION FONDATION LA MAIN À LA PÂTE – ACADÉMIE DES SCIENCES Disseminating Resources & Tools for teachers Multilingual, Free access, Inquiry based In phase with IPCC Reports Enabling Teachers Building a critical mind and an hopeful heart Helping Students to Understand and to Act Regional Events to implement Climate Change Education
  13. 13. Office for Climate Education Statement: http://www.fondation-lamap.org/erice-climate-2017 A PREFIGURATION STUDY (APRIL – SEPT. 2017) June 2018
  14. 14. Office for Climate Education WHAT IS THE “OFFICE FOR CLIMATE EDUCATION”? June 2018 Launched in Paris on March 2018
  15. 15. Office for Climate Education MAIN OBJECTIVES OF THE OFFICE FOR CLIMATE EDUCATION TEACHERS Primary and secondary schools Developing and developed countries RESOURCE PRODUCTION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT June 2018
  16. 16. Office for Climate Education Involvement of scientific community (IPCC, Science Academies, labs…) In phase with IPCC reports Systemic approach : resources / professional development / network Free, multilingual and open-source International cooperation / co-production with field actors (NGOs, teachers…) Actives pedagogies ORIGINALITY June 2018
  17. 17. A GLOBAL NETWORK
  18. 18. Office for Climate Education THE OFFICE FOR CLIMATE EDUCATION AND ITS NETWORK June 2018 Conduct local workshops SCIENTIFIC AND PEDAGOGICAL COMMITTEE TEACHERS Primary and secondary schools TEACHER TRAINERS SCIENTIFIC AND PEDAGOGICAL PARTNERS worldwide Provide and adapt pedagogical resources Organize professional development Initiates and coordinates Organizes international workshops Conduct pedagogical projects on climate change with children Provide feedback and expertise Assists Executive secretariat in Paris Provides pedagogical resources International visibility Quality management
  19. 19. Office for Climate Education June 2018 OPERATIONAL PARTNERS
  20. 20. Office for Climate Education OPERATIONAL PARTNERS June 2018 AFRICA South Africa Capetown AIMS Centre / Muizenberg Benin Academy of Sciences Ministry of secondary education (via AFD partnership) Ivory Coast Ministry of education Mauritius Mauritius Institute of Education Madagascar Association « Ecoles du monde » Morocco Ecole Normale Supérieure de Casablanca Senegal Ministère de l’éducation Tunisia Institut supérieur de l’éducation et de la formation continue ASIA Cambodia Avenir Cambodge India Amrita University Indonesia PT Kuark Internasional Malaysia International Science, Technology and Innovation Centre for South-South Cooperation (UNESCO-ISTIC) Thailand National Science and Technology Fair Taiwan Ministry of Education AMERICA Argentina Science Academy Canada Regional center for science and technology teaching University of Saskatchewan Chile Science Academy Educación en Ciencias Basada en la Indagación (ECBI, in partnership with the Ministry of Education) Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile Colombia Municipalité de Medellín (Experimento/Siemens network) Science Academy Universidad de los Andes United-States Carleton College Make knowledge Smithsonian Science Education Center University of California Office of the President French Antilles Ministry of education French Guiana Maison pour la Science (in partnership with the ministry of national education) National Center for Spatial Studies (CNES) Mexico Innovec Science Academy Uruguay Science Academy Universidad de la Republica West Indies CARISCIENCE (in partnership with the UNESCO) University of the West Indies
  21. 21. Office for Climate Education OPERATIONAL PARTNERS June 2018 EUROPE Germany Freie Universität Berlin Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research Siemens Stiftung Stiftung Haus der kleinen Forscher France Albédo Climat Fondation Luciole International research center of environment and development Centre de Rencontres et d'Échanges Internationaux du Pacifique Foundation La main à la pâte and the House for Science network (in partnership with the ministry of education) Fondation Tara Expéditions Institut Pierre Simon Laplace Institut de Recherche pour le Développement Météo et Climat Météo France Museum National d’Histoire Naturelle Ireland Institute of Education Italy National Association of Natural Science Teachers INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS Foundation for Environment Education (FEE) InterAcademy Partnership (IAP) International Council for Science (ICSU) IPCC Working Group 1 – Technical Support Unit Southeast Asian Ministers of education Organisation Regional Centre for Education in Science and Mathematics (SAMEO-RECSAM)
  22. 22. ELABORATION OF RESOURCES
  23. 23. Office for Climate Education PEDAGOGICAL RESOURCES June 2018 SUMMARY AND TOOLS FOR TEACHERS phased with IPCC reports GLOBAL / REGIONAL / LOCAL PRODUCTION MULTILINGUAL & OPENSOURCE CLASS ACTIVITIES PEDAGOGICAL PROGRESSIONS PARTICIPATIVE SCIENCE TESTIMONIES & NARRATIVES SCIENTIFIC DOCUMENTATION SIMULATORS SERIOUS GAMES
  24. 24. SOME SPECIFICITIES OF CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION • Science of climate : understanding (inquiry) • Social sciences : attenuation, adaptation, • Ethics : solidarity, change of behaviour • Action : empowerment of students • Opportunities in building a carbon-free society
  25. 25. PEDAGOGICAL RESOURCES PRODUCTION The global mean atmospheric temperature level has increased by 1°C since the preindustrial period In the 19th, progress in sciences and technologies in Europe have led to an industrial revolution Progress in chemistry, medecine and agriculture have led to a rapid increase of the human population The steam engine, and the explosion engine have led to a large increase in fossile fuel consumption Since the 19th century, human beeings emits more CO2 in the atmosphere On the atmosphere Carbon dioxyde (CO2) is called a Greenhouse gaz In a Greenhouse, the sunlight (visible light) heats the inside materials These materials absorb the light: their temperature increases The heated materials emit Infrared radiations The Infrared radiations are trapped by the glass of the greenhouse As a consequence, the temperature inside the Greenhouse increases Certain gases in the atmosphere have a similar effect: they do not absorb visible light, but trap infrared light. They are called the "Greenhouse gases" The Greenhouse effect is a natural phenomenon. Without it, the mean temperature on Earth would be -18°C instead of +15°C Other gases, like water (H20) or methane (CH4) are also Greenhouse gases In any case, global warming should conntinue during a few decades. At current rate, it should be 1.5°C in 2040 On the oceans Climate change leads to a large number of ongoing consequences. The gravity of the future impacts increase with the amplitude of the future warming. Heat waves are more frequent, and more intense Droughts are more frequent, and more intense Floodings are more frequent, and more intense On a global scale, precipitation are increasing due to the increase in evaporation Contrats in space are increasing: dry regions tend to be drier ; wet regions tend to be wetter Contrats in time are increasing: dry seasons tend to be drier ; wet seasons tend to be wetter Storms are more frequent and more intense Cyclones are more intense (but not more frequent) The absorption of the atmospheric CO2 by the oceans leads to an acidification of the oceans the thermal expansion of the ocean contributes to the sea level rise the melting of continental ice (glaciers, ice sheets) contributes to the sea level rise The sea level has been rising for 20cm since the 19th century. According to different scenarios, It could increase for 0.5 to 2 meters by the end of the 21st century. Continental ice (glaciers, ice sheets) is melting in most of the regions in the world Arctic and antarctic sea ice are melting In any case, the sea level rise will continue for centuries Thresholds for irreversible melting of the Greenland and West-Antarctic ice sheets may occur between 1.5°C and 2°C. Fossil energies (oil, natural gaz, coal) come from organic material's slow transformation during millions of years organic material is based on carbon molecules the reservoirs of fossil fuels are limited burning fossil fuels releases CO2 in the atmosphere Water, as most of the liquids, expands when warming up The global warming could be between 2 and 6°C by the end of the 21st century according to different IPCC scenarios. The intergovermental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has been created to provide the world with a clear scientific view on climate change and its impacts. Some regions will experience 3 times larger warming than the global mean The inland regions experience more warming than costal areas The oceans have a large thermal inertia, compared to the continents The Northern hemisphere, which contains the larger continental surface, experience more warming than the Southern one. Poles experience more warming than the global average The sea level rise will decrease the access to fresh water close to the coasts The sea level rise will increase the infiltration of salt water in groundwater or estuaries The access of fresh water will be critical in sensitive regions as small islands The Arctic region temperature is warming two times faster than the rest of the world When the sea ice is melting, it increases the surface of the ocean and decrease the surface of the sea ice The change in surface decreases the albedo of the Arctic region The albedo is the reflecting power of a surface which means the ratio between the reflected light and the incident light The increase of the water surface increases the water evaporation and the quantity of water vapor in the atmosphere It decreases the culture of some lands The sea level rise leads to coastal erosion Preserving or restoring natural coastal ecosystems are more cost-effective protection of coastal regions that building sea walls and coastal hardening The greater heat stress is expected for the Mediterranean region Extreme events will induce decrease in crop production The warmer temperatures will increase the transmission of infectuous diseases Over 100 million people projected to go into poverty through impacts on agriculture, food prices and general vulnerability Constraining global warming to 1.5°C compared to 2°C reduces stress on global water resources by an estimated 50% The risk for food production and extreme poverty is significant in the Middle-East, Sub-Saharan Africa, South East Asia and Central and South America with 1.5°C warming Increasing temperatures will directly impact tourism market including beach and snow ports tourism It is possible that at 1.5°C global warming Arctic Ocean would be nearly ice free in September The increase of 1.5°C will change the ocean chemistry. It will take millenia to recover Due to temperature increase some species relocate and novel ecosystems appear Ecosystems that are less able to move are projected to experience high rates of mortality and loss Changes in biodiversity have major implications for food webs, ecosystem structure and services, fisheries and human livelihoods Risks for natural and managed ecosystems are amplified on drylands compared to humid lands CO2 removal can accelerate the decline of CO2 emissions to help avoiding a temperature overshoot In order to limit global mean warming to 1.5°C, greenhouse emissions have to decrease rapidly and deeply The reduction of greenhouse gases emission has to be induced by strong policies and short term actions CO2 removal measures include: afforestation and/or biomass energy with carbon capture and storage The nationally determined contributions submitted under the Paris Agreement will result, in aggregate, in global greenhouse emissions in 2030 which are higher than those in scenarios compatible with limiting global warming to 1.5°C by 2100. Paris agreement Coastal and small island population are more likely to experience poverty and relocation
  26. 26. PEDAGOGICAL RESOURCES PRODUCTION rature level has increased by 1°C since the preindustrial period h, progress in sciences and technologies pe have led to an industrial revolution edecine ease ion The steam engine, and the explosion engine have led to a large increase in fossile fuel consumption the 19th century, human beeings s more CO2 in the atmosphere Carbon dioxyde (CO2) is called a Greenhouse gaz In a Greenhouse, the sunlight (visible light) heats the inside materials These materials absorb the light: their temperature increases The heated materials emit Infrared radiations The Infrared radiations are trapped by the glass of the greenhouse As a consequence, the temperature inside the Greenhouse increases Certain gases in the atmosphere have a similar effect: they do not absorb visible light, but trap infrared light. They are called the "Greenhouse gases" The Greenhouse effect is a natural phenomenon. Without it, the mean temperature on Earth would be -18°C instead of +15°C Other gases, like water (H20) or methane (CH4) are also Greenhouse gases Fossil energies (oil, natural gaz, coal) come from organic material's slow transformation during millions of years organic material is based on carbon molecules the reservoirs of fossil fuels are limited burning fossil fuels releases CO2 in the atmosphere
  27. 27. ACTING CLOSE TO THE TEACHERS
  28. 28. Office for Climate Education TEACHER PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT June 2018 LOCAL TEACHERS’ TRAINING SESSIONS o By local partners DISTANT TRAINING SESSIONS o By the Office for Climate Education + local partners INTERNATIONAL EVENTS o COP side events o Symposiums o Summer schools…
  29. 29. Office for Climate Education WHAT WE WANT TO PROMOTE June 2018 Understanding of complex systems Critical thinking Use of experiment, modelling, serious games, testimonies, debate… Development of empathy Focusing on solutions Think their future in a changing world
  30. 30. PEDAGOGICAL RESOURCES PRODUCTION
  31. 31. RESOURCES FOR TRAINERS
  32. 32. Office for Climate Education WHAT WE WANT TO PROMOTE (cont.) June 2018 Act in the school Engage in the community
  33. 33. NEXT STEPS
  34. 34. 2018 : CONCEPTUAL SCHEME 2019 : FULL DEPLOYEMENT IPCC REPORTS 2018 & 2019
  35. 35. Office for Climate Education NEXT STEPS (1/2) June 2018 2018 IPCC report 1.5°C OCE Website + few resources OCT. 2019 2020 2021 2022 IPCC reports - ocean & cryosphere - land use 1st OCE report - ocean & cryosphere OCT. IPCC AR 6 report OCE final report OCT. Phase 1 : 3-4 regions Phase 2 : extention Phase 3 : generalization 2nd OCE report - Land use OCT. 3rd OCE report - Teacher training OCT.
  36. 36. Office for Climate Education NEXT STEPS (2/2) June 2018 August 2018: Malaysia -> teacher training workshop Sept. 2018: California -> high level Nov. 2018 : Paris – UNESCO -> high level (round table) Nov. 2018 : Benin -> high level + teacher training workshop Dec. 2019: Poland (COP 24) -> high level Jan. 2019 : Tunis -> teacher training workshop May 2019 : Chile -> high level + teacher training workshop June 2019 : Fidji -> high level + teacher training workshop 2019 (Fall) : Mexico -> high level + teacher training workshop
  37. 37. contact@oce.global www.oce.global

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