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FIRST EDITION DEBATE ON THE CURRENT SYSTEM OF CONTEMPORARY ART

THE

SOFTPOWER
OF

THE ARTMARKET
AND THE CONTEMPORARY
GLOB...
Produced by:

www.cosminnasui.com

Published by

Splaiul Independenţei nr. 319,
Complex SEMA PARC, O.P. 84, Cod 060044
Buc...
NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY

CONTENTS

5

51

24

THE SOFT POWER OF THE
ARTMARKET

FOCUS CRISTIAN TODIE

COLOURING ...
NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY

CONTENTS

VI.
16 The market and the industrialization of artistic values
from the seco...
DEBATE
simulation of artwork
structure in the field of
production

ECONOMIC CAPITAL
of the artwork

CULTURAL CAPITAL
of th...
Hypotheses:
assumptions for this
paper and for further
discussions
2.1. Post Duchamp &
Warhol contemporary
art as the new ...
DEBATE

Photo: THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC; PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART

Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait...
Photo: CRISTIAN TODIE

Cristian Todie,
”Caddy® Baroc”, 2001,
used into the performance
action ”ACHAT”

8 | Năsui Private C...
I. Post Duchamp &
Warhol paradigm:
the new folk art

T

he end of the twentieth
century art has undergone one of the most
...
Photo: AUREL TAR

Aurel Tar, ”GIBRALTAR
ultraperiferic art corner”,
”Pastorale Orangerie”, Râpa Roșie
– Sebeș, România, 20...
DEBATE

II. Perishability
as the common attribute
of styles and theories

Photo: T NOEB SE

T

aking into consideration th...
III. The value of art after
the twentieth century

H

ere is how Pierre
Bourdieu explains the
value of art4:

“The produce...
DEBATE

IV. The crisis
of present day values

Photo: AUREL TAR

T

Aurel Tar ,
”DOITSCH PROIEKT - 2 EURO”,
2008, acrylic o...
Photo: LUCIAN MUNTEAN

Bogdan Rața, ”HandGun”,
in Piaţa Presei Libere,
within ”Proiect 1990”,
Bucharest, Romania

14 | Năs...
DEBATE

V. Institutionalized art
and its role as
a soft power

T

he institutionalization
of art finds many forms
and role...
VI. The market and
the industrialization
of artistic values from
the second half of the
twentieth century

T

he industria...
DEBATE
The emergence of minor
markets gives them the title of
emerging markets. They become
interesting for major markets,...
VII. Art institutions
as agents

Collectors Museum

Private contemporary art
museums have become a catalyst
for investment...
DEBATE
access only to certain galleries and
networks of galleries in order to
show and sell the production and
the artisti...
T

he global crisis of values
with all its derivatives
echoes in the global art
scene and market. The
accelerated capitali...
DEBATE

IX. Corrupt art

O

ne of the observed effects
of the industrialization of
contemporary art is that
art markets ca...
X. Alternative systems
to the main markets for
contemporary art

Emerging markets in
Eastern Europe
Emerging art markets o...
DEBATE
Europe, Central Asia, emerging
countries etc.).

Deinstitutionalized
institutions

One of the institutions pirated
...
NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY

CURATORIAL CONCEPT

Colouring the Grey
State of Body
The state of body represents a mo...
WWW.INDEPENDENTSBIENNIAL.ORG

2012-2013

Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 25
Radu Belcin,
”Untold things”,
2012, oil on canvas,
100 x 80cm
26 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery

2012-2013
Radu Belcin,
”Self Improvement”,
2012, oil on canvas,
120 x 100 cm

2012-2013

Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 27
Dragoș Burlacu,
”Study V”, 2012,
40 x 30 cm,
oil on glossy sheet

28 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery

2012-2013
Dragoș Burlacu,
”Waiting crowd”, 2012,
30 x 66 cm, oil on
stainless steel sheet

Dragoș Burlacu,
”Study IV”, 2012,
40 x 30...
Dragoş Burlacu,
”Beyond reflection”,
96 x 66 cm, oil on
stainless steel sheet

30 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery

20...
Dragoş Burlacu,
”Beyond reflection”,
96 x 66 cm, oil on
stainless steel sheet

2012-2013

Năsui Private Collection & Galle...
Francisc Chiuariu,
”Outdoor summer 6”,
2011, oil & ink on backlit,
80 x 120 cm

Francisc Chiuariu,
”Outdoor spring 2”,
201...
Francisc Chiuariu,
”Forever Ikea IV”,
2011, oil on canvas,
80 x 120 cm

Francisc Chiuariu,
”Forever Ikea V”,
2012, oil on ...
Felix Deac, ”Eidetic 2”, 2010,
silicon, poly rubber, make-up,
mixed media, 32×22×18 cm

Felix Deac,
”Agglomeration”, 2011,...
Felix Deac,
”Eidetic 1”, 2011,
silicon, poly rubber,
make-up, mixed media,
18 x 13 x 15 cm

2012-2013

Năsui Private Colle...
Flavia Pitiș,
”Overpassing the past”,
2012, oil on canvas,
80 x 100cm

36 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery

2012-2013
Flavia Pitiș,
”Soul learning to live II”,
2012, oil on canvas,
120x100cm

2012-2013

Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | ...
Aurel Tar,
”Tempelhof Necklace 2”,
2012
acrylic on canvas,
120 x 120 cm
Aurel Tar,
”Luise red kissBerlinicus series”, 2012...
Aurel Tar, ”Wonderful
collapse”, 2012,
4 pannels, each 80 x 150 cm,
modular painting

2012-2013

Năsui Private Collection ...
40 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery

2012-2013
Photo OXANA TORNOREANU

Bogdan Raţa, ”Trying to Keep Life”,
2012, polyester, synthetic resin,
fibre, paint, metal, water,
...
42 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery

2012-2013
Photo OXANA TORNOREANU

Bogdan Raţa, ”Trying to Keep Life”, 2012,
polyester, synthetic resin,
fibre, paint, metal, water,
...
Bogdan Raţa
”Round and Round”, 2012,
polyester, synthetic resin,
fibre, paint, metal,
105 x 86 x 41 cm

44 | Năsui Private...
2012-2013

Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 45
46 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery

2012-2013
Felix Deac
”Artificial Life 01”, 2011, silicon,
poly rubber, make-up, mixed
media, 150 × 170 × 70 cm,
page 46 - details
20...
Felix Deac
”Dead Pillow”, 2011,
silicon, poly rubber,
make-up, mixed media,
18 x 38 x 38 cm
page 49 - details

48 | Năsui ...
2012-2013

Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 49
Photo: CRISTIAN TODIE

Cristian Todie,
”Volume 2D”,
2012, folded paper

50 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery

2012-2013
WWW.ART-THEORIQUE.COM

FOCUS

Introducing Theoretical Art
My «theoretical art» concentrates on the aesthetics of theory
an...
Cristian Todie,
”Volume 2D”,
2012, simulation
52 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery

2012-2013
Cristian Todie,
”Volume 2D”,
2012, folded paper
2012-2013

Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 53
Cristian Todie,
”Volume 2D”,
2012

54 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery

2012-2013
Cristian Todie,
”Volume 2D”,
1999-2002
2012-2013

Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 55
NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY

ARTISTS SELECTED BIO

Dragoș
Burlacu

Bogdan Rața

Dragoș Burlacu balances in wide rag...
FIND MORE ABOUT THE NEXT CURATORIAL PROJECT
”FUTURE NOW, WORKING TITLE” ON WWW.COSMINNASUI.COM

Aurel Tar
Aurel Tar is a p...
NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY

ARTISTS SELECTED BIO

Radu Belcin

Flavia Pitiș

Radu Belcin catches attention by new
...
Felix Deac
”Exceeding materiality and material
conditions, I started to play shaping
the forms respecting the logic of the...
NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY

PARTNERS

St George’s Hall
”Colouring the Grey - State of Body” presents seven contemp...
2012-2013

Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 61
Best Communication Media provides services of
translation, interpretation, notary legalization,
subtitling, DTP etc. in sp...
Chapman Taylor is an international practice
of architects, masterplanners and interior
designers operating from 17 regiona...
FUTURE NOW

WORKING TITLE
2013-2014

The curatorial concept gathers synergies
from the two fields of creation: art and
sci...
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The soft power of the artmarket - a new East European fresh look at the art systems

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”The Soft Power of the Art Market” is a new East European fresh look at the systems that are now in charge of producing contemporary art in a globalized world. It reveals the challenges of the contemporary art as a soft power, defined by its geopolitical strategies and defined as an extension of the powerful global markets. The contemporary art between media and power is changing the equilibrium between the cultural capital and economic capital.

The idea of the New Folklore is introduced in terms of the new aesthetics for the XXI century. The new aesthetics of production and consumption (under the sign of the paradigms launched by Duchamp and Warhol) is nowadays generating a very large amount of cultural artistic products lost, in a very accelerated manner. This speed and this amount lead to an unexpectedly anonymity, thus generating not individual specific creation but general, collective types of artistic work – actually a new type of folklore.

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The soft power of the artmarket - a new East European fresh look at the art systems

  1. 1. FIRST EDITION DEBATE ON THE CURRENT SYSTEM OF CONTEMPORARY ART THE SOFTPOWER OF THE ARTMARKET AND THE CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ART AS THE NEW FOLKLORE COLOURING THE GREY State of Body “Colouring the Grey” curatorial project has opened a series of three exhibi­ ions, t by bringing forward the Romanian emergent artists in international cultural spaces, in 2011-2012. The concept illustrates an overview on the East-European identity in tran­ ition. The first was pre­ ented within “Special Projects” section s s of the Moscow Bi­ nnale of Contemporary Art 2011, under the name ”The Second e Wave of Romanian Emerging Contemporary Artists” (September 2011). Second exhibition was presented in Artists’ House Tel Aviv, the oldest cultural location in Israel (1934), developping the concept of “State of Mind” (November-December 2011). The third and last part of the series is called ”State of Body” and is exposed within the Independents Liverpool Biennial 2012. ISBN: 978-973-1984-86-5
  2. 2. Produced by: www.cosminnasui.com Published by Splaiul Independenţei nr. 319, Complex SEMA PARC, O.P. 84, Cod 060044 Bucureşti, Sector 6 www.vellant.ro Texts by Cosmin Năsui, Oana Năsui Editing & proofreading: Oana Năsui, Anca Lepădatu, Oana Dumitru, Layout: Cosmin Năsui Sponsors Partners Thanks to: Claudia Andrei, Ana Maria Badea, Lewis Biggs, Anca Crăciun, Terry Duffy, Chaim Efrima, Cristi Farcaș, Dana Ichim (Asociaţia Maia), Joli Miklos, Florin Miron, Dana Neţoi, Cătălin Pantea, Ion Alexandru Radu, Simona Rădulescu, Dan Pleșa, Sara Scheuer, Alan Smith, Angela Toader, Eugen Voicu, Anthony Willats Special thanks to artists involved in this project Copyright © 2012 Cosmin Năsui. All rights reserved. Contents of this publication may not be reproduced in any form without written permission of Nasui Private Collection & Gallery. ISBN: 978-973-1984-86-5 Printed at CNI CORESI SA 2 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  3. 3. NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY CONTENTS 5 51 24 THE SOFT POWER OF THE ARTMARKET FOCUS CRISTIAN TODIE COLOURING THE GREY STATE OF BODY Debate on the current system of contemporary art Introducing Theoretical Art Rediscovering corporal figuration in realistic key THE SOFT POWER OF THE ARTMARKET INTRODUCTION 5 Definitions 6 Hypotheses 6 Post Duchamp & Warhol contemporary art as the new popular & folk art 6 Folk art, a consequence of the paradigm change. The artwork’s folk feature 6 Contemporary art as entertainment industry 6 The public receiving, contributing to and continuing the art's folk attribute 7 Art beyond systems and institutions 7 Introducing Theoretical Art 7 The cultural capital and the economic capital of the artwork 7 Artwork addiction to the capital circulation I. 9 Post Duchamp & Warhol paradigm: the new folk art II. 11 Perishability as the common attribute of styles and theories III. 12 The value of art after the twentieth century IV. 13 The crisis of present day values V. 15 Institutionalized art and its role as a soft power SPECIAL EDITION FOR PREVIEW BERLIN & INDEPENDENTS LIVERPOOL BIENNIAL 2012 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 3
  4. 4. NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY CONTENTS VI. 16 The market and the industrialization of artistic values from the second half of the twentieth century 16 The geography of contemporary art: major and minor markets, shrinking markets and emerging markets 16 The economy of cultural and artistic values VII. 18 Art institutions as agents 18 Collectors Museum 18 The Agency-Gallery 18 Art dealer 18 Art fairs 19 Auction houses 19 Investment funds and their returns 19 The public 19 The artist VIII. 20 The competition of art market giants IX. 21 Corrupt art X. 22 Emerging markets in Eastern Europe 22 Activists 23 Dezinstitutionalized institutions 23 Economy of sharing, collaborative consumption, Fair Trade CURATORIAL CONCEPT 24 Colouring the Grey - State of Body SELECTED ARTWORKS 26 Radu Belcin, Dragoș Burlacu, Francisc Chiuariu, Felix Deac, Bogdan Rața, Flavia Pitiș, Aurel Tar FOCUS CRISTIAN TODIE 51 Introducing Theoretical Art ARTIST SHORT BIO 54 Radu Belcin, Dragoș Burlacu, Francisc Chiuariu, Felix Deac, Flavia Pitiș, Bogdan Rața, Aurel Tar PARTNERS 58 St George’s Hall, Best Communication Media, Certinvest, Chapman Taylor UPCOMING PROJECT 64 Future Now, Working Title 4 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  5. 5. DEBATE simulation of artwork structure in the field of production ECONOMIC CAPITAL of the artwork CULTURAL CAPITAL of the artwork CULTURAL CAPITAL of the artwork ECONOMIC CAPITAL of the artwork Western Europe & USA Eastern Europe & emerging states * This material is used as a starting point for discussions on the current system of contemporary art. The recording of debates in various cultural areas will add to this material to create a subsequent book. Thank you for all comments, live or at cosmin@cosminnasui.com. Photo: NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY A rt in the 21st century is looking for a new artistic paradigm that should restore the aesthetic and commercial valuation system. The theory that this study aims at introducing is that, at the end of the 20th century and beginning of the 21st century, contemporary culture and art have begun generating a new type of ”urban folklore”, forced, through the speed of novelty, to enter an anonymous artistic consumption and production. Definitions of concepts FOLKLORE: all stories, legends and creative production owned I. Introduction by a particular space, group or specific activity. In this material, it refers to the urban areas in general, as art generators, all around the globe. POPULAR: that can be easily understood by anyone, simple, natural CREATIVE INDUSTRIES are considered components of modern post-industrial economies and synthesize a series of characteristics1: - they represent a set of intensive knowledge activities, part of the knowledge-based economy; - include design, production and distribution activities of goods and services with high artistic and scientific creativity, respectively having intangible cultural or information / encoded (as intellectual property) assets; - have the ability to generate revenue from marketing creative products and services, as well as from the exploitation of intellectual property rights; - have the potential to generate economic sustainable growth, promoting social inclusion, cultural diversity and human development. THE CULTURAL AND CREATIVE2 INDUSTRIES are: Advertising, Architecture, Art and art market, Crafts, Design, Fashion, Movie, Video and photography, Software and computer games, Music, Visual arts and Performing arts, Publishing, Television, Radio. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 5
  6. 6. Hypotheses: assumptions for this paper and for further discussions 2.1. Post Duchamp & Warhol contemporary art as the new popular & folk art We define the post Duchamp & Warhol contemporary art as contemporary folk art, an art using anthropological decoding tools specific to nowadays urban areas. We also consider it a popular art, easy to understand, using very well known idioms and iconographies, globally spread. 2. 2. Folk art, a consequence of the paradigm change. The artwork’s folk feature The types of artistic emulation, known as Schools or Trends, are actually creative products generated by prototype models. This kind of art objects is derived from the interpretation of reality made by artists, from the prototype perspective. This is supplemented by the wide dissemination of artistic message to the public very wide open to interpretations. All these form the folk 6 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013 characteristic of an artwork. 2.3. Contemporary art as entertainment industry The power and expansion of global entertainment industry is due to features such as ”simple”, ”easy” based upon which creative products are disseminated and understood unbelievably fast and by a large extent of people from different cultural areas. We hereby define contemporary art as entertainment, with features such as: mass production and distribution, general audience, high aesthetic tolerance, afterhours broadcast (after the working program), following the same audience segment in competition with show arts (music concerts, dance, theater, etc.), movie industry and TV productions. The entertainment function of contemporary art is the result of the need for relaxation, of the social cultural alternative to the time assigned to work. The need for entertainment is directly proportional to the access to free time of a society. Culture and arts are the trade support of entertainment activities and products. Artistic genres and cultural products and any other derived products are unprecedentedly in ongoing development. 2.4. The public receiving, contributing to and continuing the art's folk attribute Public frustration of educated people when meeting entertainment forms of contemporary art is recorded through the inability of selection and attraction to easiness. The speed of entertainment artistic productions shows the high level of perishability of the value and reduced cultural capital. 2.5. Art beyond systems and institutions In reversal to contemporary art as folk art, genuine art is the one that generates research and de-automates consciousness, first of the artist, then of the viewer. Genuine art is open to anyone and no form of power or capital should have ownership monopoly on art.
  7. 7. DEBATE Photo: THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC; PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait in Drag, 1981. Dye diffusion transfer print (Polaroid), 3 11/16" x 2 7/8" Art autonomy is demonstrated by the fact that it can be produced independently, outside institutions, whether public or private. The critical self-negation essential for the development of art often takes place outside institutional practices. To society, the contesting role of contemporary art is important and uncensored, even if associated to any revolution, reform or radicalism factor. Art between power (politics) and market (economic) acquires (media) addiction. Art should not exist only in and for museums and on the art market, but also with the aim to develop and always articulate new ways of critical sensitivity. Genuine art should become a tool to see and learn the world with all its contradictions. From this point of view, museums and art institutions should function mainly as depositories and laboratories for the world’s aesthetic exploration. Private or public institutions should prevent art from privatization, economic assignment and subordination to the populist logic of culture industry. In The Rules of Art (p. 104) Pierre Bourdieu records the types of art objects: social art, bourgeois art, art for art and pure art. Upgrading these categories in nowadays contemporaneity we could classify the art of Jeff Koons, for example, Rose Sélavy (Marcel Duchamp), 1921. Photograph by Man Ray. Art Direction by Marcel Duchamp. Silver print. 5-7/8" x 3"-7/8" in the category of bourgeois art and aesthetics. with no important commercial value, with dissemination and movement restricted almost always to the producers themselves. Therefore, Eastern Europe understands and defines differently the cultural capital and the economic capital of the artwork. On the other hand, recent intense exploitation within the areas of the economic powers (the Anglo-Saxon American model) of artworks accumulations of economic capital has led to various types of economies which subordinated and marginalized their cultural capital. 2.6. Theoretical art A form of genuine art is theoretical art. Theoretical art means art which is based on a theory, develops it and arguments it visually and artistically. The difference between theoretical and conceptual art is that the latter replaces the object with the concept, operating a change of language and means of expression. Theoretical art is art inspired through research by forms of science such as mathematics, geometry, physics, etc. Theoretical art investigates scientific researches on the structure of which it builds new realities. Works of theoretical art are patented as inventions and protected by industry. Their owners can use them with prototype value, but also with the opportunity to be reproduced at large scale for utility purposes. See the postulate of Cristian Todie page 51. 2.7. The cultural capital and the economic capital of the artwork The absence of Eastern European art market in the last almost six decades has produced artworks 2.8. Artwork addiction to the capital circulation Artifact self-sufficiency and social engagement of art have been corrupted by the forces getting in touch with it: politics, economics, media. The accepted, official, conformist art is the result of public, political corruption (as distortion), while the decorativism and entertainment art are the result of private corruption made by commercial and utility structures. Contemporary art is dependent on the movement of capital. A contemporary art oriented to the progress of the cultural capital would lead to the loss of market, just as market development involves maximizing the profit and increasing economic capital. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 7
  8. 8. Photo: CRISTIAN TODIE Cristian Todie, ”Caddy® Baroc”, 2001, used into the performance action ”ACHAT” 8 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  9. 9. I. Post Duchamp & Warhol paradigm: the new folk art T he end of the twentieth century art has undergone one of the most radical paradigm shifts from Leonardo Da Vinci. Marcel Duchamp and Andy Warhol, the pioneers of this new artistic paradigm have each launched definitions and mechanisms that have irrevocably transformed the understanding of the function and forms of art. The former left art without the object of the professional art craft, the latter deprived it of its unique value. Many innovations have occurred successively, using these new paradigm formats, leaving, on one hand, many artists without their livelihood and, on the other hand, a great part of the public in discontent, because of the misunderstanding of art works and in extensio of artistic phenomena. Relinquishing its function as object, art was progressively charged with concept until this has become indispensable to it. The charging with concept of the artistic production is inversely proportional to the presence of the art object; it might even be absent from the encounter with the artistic discourse or the materiality of creation. Because art no longer requires craft skills, the savoir faire is widely accessible to creators. Artistic means and stylistic methods were made available to the public, giving rise to hybrids, true folk artists, producers or co-producers (not only through interpretation) of artistic creation and different types of derivatives of artistic character. Through mimicry, these artists take advantage of this systematic confusion of cultural capital production and pursue financial resources in order to become new Jeff Koons-es. Art criticism has gradually remained without the object of analysis; it became a rigid and academicized textualism of highlyconceptual or philosophical and aesthetic discourses. The analysis of concepts transformed art criticism into a discipline of hunting footnoted quotes to build a metadiscourse on artistic concepts, lacking in object form, oftentimes dull and incomprehensible to the general public, like a network of parallel mirrors. The “prophets“ Duchamp and Warhol have been interpreted, quoted and reinvented worldwide for more than 60 years without anyone being able to provide a real invention or an exit from the paradigm created by them. In more than six decades, it was formed a critical mass of new folk of contemporary art, adapted to the anonymity of the speed of artistic production and of every person’s 15 minutes of fame, prophesied by Andy Warhol. This folk art is currently represented by hundreds of thousands of professional artists and amateurs around the world, in the same random way in which people in the Cucuteni period, the Metal Age or the Gothic Middle Ages produced works with a common folk denominator. Then, the same materials (ceramics, iron, etc.), motifs and decorative patterns, tools were discovered and used simultaneously on an extended geographical area, similar to what we call today a global phenomenon. Nowadays, globalization occurs locally by the adoption and adaptation of macro-models into micromodels. This local micro-globalization of contemporary art phenomena makes the styles of the artists resemble one another very much, without discovering great differences between the cultural areas of origin. In search of originality, artists have come to be similar. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 9
  10. 10. Photo: AUREL TAR Aurel Tar, ”GIBRALTAR ultraperiferic art corner”, ”Pastorale Orangerie”, Râpa Roșie – Sebeș, România, 2010 performance, action 10 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  11. 11. DEBATE II. Perishability as the common attribute of styles and theories Photo: T NOEB SE T aking into consideration the fact that a paradigm shift generates a folklore specific to itself, types of folklore, developed after various stylistic periods of the history of art can be followed. Art objects herein called “folk objects” are the product of mechanisms started from a model based on extensive production, regardless of the historical period. One can identify examples like the Venetian School having Titian as prototype, the Florentine School with Botticelli, the Little Dutch Masters with Pieter Brueghel the Elder, the School of Rubens, the one of Rembrandt, Pre-Raphaelites with Raphael, the Barbizon School beginning with Constable and continuing with Millet, the cubist folklore around Picasso, etc. Putting scientific research at the center of art, Leonardo Da Vinci generates on a historical scale the most important art paradigm shift until the twentieth century. Strong Trends or Schools manage to impose themselves as Styles. Styles are conglomerates composed of a prototype, its Jeff Koons' sculpture Puppy, a 12 metres high puppy made of fresh flowers built sculpture for the Documenta in Kassel 1992. Nowadays its place is permanently at the front of the Guggenheim museum in Bilbao variations (Trends/Schools), public perception of the time, values ​​and theories that contain stylistic features. They practically form what we call in this material folklore/folk art. Each style goes through three stages: avant-garde, consecration, mannerism. The distances between the stages are different from case to case. These styles, actually types of folklore, once absorbed by their contemporariness, expand, then shrink and are replaced. According to some researchers3, in order to be established to an audience, a style needs thirty years of peace, three years of war and three months of crisis. The theories, the conceptual scaffolding of the Styles, are also subject to perishability. Paradigm-changing prototypes actually reveal new functions of art and specific forms to valorize it. Also, a crisis of values ​​and theoretical systems is the sign of the paradigm going into the mannerism stage. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 11
  12. 12. III. The value of art after the twentieth century H ere is how Pierre Bourdieu explains the value of art4: “The producer of the value of the work of art is not the artist, but the field of production, as the universe of faith, which produces the value of the work of art as a fetish, determining faith in the artist’s creative power. Since the work of art has no value as symbolic world unless it is known and recognized, that is, socially established as a work of art to viewers endowed with the disposition and aesthetic competence knowledge necessary to know and recognize it, the science of works has as object not only the material production of the work, but also the production of the value of the work or of the faith in the value of the work, which is the same thing. Therefore, it must take into account not only the direct producers of the work in its materiality (artist, writer, etc.), but also all the agents and the institutions involved in the production of the value of the work by producing faith in the value of art in general and the distinctive value of a particular work of art (i.e. critics, 12 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013 art historians, publishers, gallery managers, dealers, museum curators, patrons, collectors, members of the courts of consecration academies, salons, juries, etc.) and all political and administrative bodies having competence in art (various ministries - depending on the period – The National Museums Department, Field of production The producer of the value of the work of art is not the artist, but the field of production. DIRECT PRODUCER OF THE WORK ARTIST AGENTS PRODUCERS OF THE VALUE OF THE WORK CRITICS, ART HISTORIANS PUBLISHERS GALLERY MANAGERS, DEALERS MUSEUM CURATORS, PATRONS, COLLECTORS MEMBERS OF THE COURTS OF CONSECRATION ACADEMIES, SALONS, JURIES POLITICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE BODIES HAVING COMPETENCE IN ART PROCUREMENT, GRANTS, AWARDS, SCHOLARSHIPS SCHOOLS OF FINE ARTS PRODUCTION OF CONSUMERS ABLE TO RECOGNIZE THE WORK OF ART Department of Fine Arts, etc.), which can interfere with the art market, either through verdicts of establishment, with or without economic benefits (procurement, grants, awards, scholarships, etc.), or by regulatory measures (tax incentives offered to various patrons and collectors, etc.). We must not forget the members of the institutions involved in the production of producers (Schools of Fine Arts, etc.) and the production of consumers able to recognize the work of art as such, as value, starting from the teachers and the parents responsible for the first inoculation of artistic dispositions.” (Pierre Bourdieu, The Rules of Art, p. 295-296) So, defining the context of producing the value of the work of art is relevant in analyzing the value of the work of art and of the artistic creation. The current art market moved the center of production of this artistic value decisively from the artist to the field of production. This industrialized field of production is not only the producer of artistic value but also the producer of artists and of the public receiving these values.
  13. 13. DEBATE IV. The crisis of present day values Photo: AUREL TAR T Aurel Tar , ”DOITSCH PROIEKT - 2 EURO”, 2008, acrylic on canvas, 150 x 150 cm he power of a Style to impose itself appears in the context of its functionality, its ability to produce values. After the values enter the phase of decline, they become models for and witnesses to stylistic sets related to historical scales. The post Duchamp and post Warhol paradigm went beyond the avant-garde and the establishment phase and reaches the mannerism phase through a crisis of the values ​​ of the paradigm. The success of the post Duchamp and post Warhol art scene is due to being built on the ​​ mechanisms of an art market economically capitalized, in an aggressive manner, at global level (see above the creative industries above and below the variety of active institutions-players). In a post-capitalist world, one of the aesthetic values of contemporary ​​ art is the result of the exploitation of economic capital inflows. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 13
  14. 14. Photo: LUCIAN MUNTEAN Bogdan Rața, ”HandGun”, in Piaţa Presei Libere, within ”Proiect 1990”, Bucharest, Romania 14 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  15. 15. DEBATE V. Institutionalized art and its role as a soft power T he institutionalization of art finds many forms and roles for all types of players on the art scene. The funding system influences the creation and the work of art in a variety of methodologies without precedent so far. through their wide dissemination. The power of dissemination and the status of official art, recognized and thus validated is a type of soft power. Typically, the forms in which this type of contemporary art is manifested are conservative. The public sector institutionalizes art through commissioning, purchasing, promotion, etc. and uses its propaganda potential to recognize power (national, political, historical, ethnographic, religious, military, etc.). This sector also gives art an educational character, for the imposition and maintenance of specific values, The private sector institutionalizes art in order to use its financial investment attributes and to build pyramid schemes in order to increase value and profit. Culture and art are under a corporate umbrella, engaging tax cuts for the corporations. Private corporate sponsorship connects art to corporate values ​​and culture. Copyright, reproduction and copying regulations are forms of control and restriction of the freedom of movement of creation and shows the high degree of interdependence of the form of finance. Creative labor rights are regulated and independently traded as a commodity on the copyright market. Thus, public and private institutions worldwide are engaged in the propaganda of systems where creation is seen as an instrument or a commodity. Knowledge is limited by control; it can no longer provoke the system due to financial interdependence, and gets to be diluted in the play of production. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 15
  16. 16. VI. The market and the industrialization of artistic values from the second half of the twentieth century T he industrialization of culture is a factor that became dominant after the second half of the twentieth century in Europe and USA. The term “cultural industry” was used by sociologists Theodor W. Adorno and Max Horkheimer in 1947 („The Dialectic of Enlightenment“) to represent all the techniques of production and reproduction of cultural works with social impact. Cultural industries have become the main model of development in the global world culture. The effects of this industrialization make art and culture accessible to large numbers of people who become consumers and thus producers of several types of markets. They can be minor or major markets, in terms of geographical origin (from the West to the East) and of distribution and consumption of artistic production (various forms of art, from the object itself to gadgets). Contemporary art is a creative 16 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013 and entertainment industry, in which aesthetic values ​​are supported and permanently equaled to commercial values. The field of production (to which Bourdieu refers) in post-capitalism is based on the circulation of values and finding their commercial correspondent. The art and culture market is the place of presentation and meeting of demand and of supply of artistic and cultural products. The geography of contemporary art: major and minor markets, shrinking markets and emerging markets Contemporary art is circulated, produced and traded mainly in cultural spaces that overlap with the geographic distribution of economic power. The maps and charts published regularly by Artprice (www.artprice.com) accurately state which are and especially which are not the areas favorable to the production and consumption of contemporary art. Globally speaking, artistic values ​​have their commercial counterpart in the economic values of the spaces of geographical origin or other consumer areas. An artistic value can be commercially converted by the market of origin, if there is local demand, or by the global consumer market, where there is power of investment and commercial reporting to that value. Depending on the economic power, one can distinguish the major markets, with an appetite for economic investment, usually in cultural and artistic expansion, through the products offered to consumption (including on minor markets). The major market serves a physically expanded area, exceeding its national and geographical boundaries, both through production and especially through
  17. 17. DEBATE The emergence of minor markets gives them the title of emerging markets. They become interesting for major markets, through the especially speculative alternatives of short-term profits that they can provide. Typically, new emerging markets overlap with emerging economies. By contrast, shrinking markets are markets where the economic capital is relocated to other areas with higher growth potential (see emerging markets). The economy of cultural and artistic values In this new economy of cultural ​​ and artistic values, the standards of classical culture are in a process of profound redefinition depending on the demand, the production and the distribution of cultural products. The commercial impact of culture and art is without precedent. Art and culture are institutionalized at a public and private level. Art institutions are agents, vehicles through which art is produced, distributed, marketed. Several types of economies of artistic values can be distinguished. There is an economy of transactions with art objects, an economy of arts services, an economy of derivatives, a copyright economy etc. Photo: NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY Daniel Buren, Monumenta 2012 @ Grand Palais, Paris. The Monumenta 2012 exhibition invited Daniel Buren to create a work for the monumental space of the 45-metre high glass atrium in the 13,500-square-metre nave of the Grand Palais in Paris. The annual exhibition featured Anselm Kiefer in 2007, Richard Serra in 2008, Christian Boltanski in 2010 and Anish Kapoor in 2011. consumption. Minor markets stand out as markets where consumption is greater than domestic production can support, and this profile actually creates them. Thus, they these become outlets for major markets. Exporting and importing culture develop in this twentieth century a global economy of values and expand ​​beyond the primary level of cultural diplomacy, which ensures knowledge and reciprocal politically correct recognition of the cultures from different geographical areas. By consuming culture, art and media, people get in touch and are exposed to the same messages, they consume the same object, have the same values​​, the same representations, similar knowledge, regardless of gender, ethnicity, religion, level of culture. Contemporary art coagulates the society in communities, maintains their stability and social structures and creates an unconscious solidarity, defined by sociologists and political scientists as a global neotribalism5. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 17
  18. 18. VII. Art institutions as agents Collectors Museum Private contemporary art museums have become a catalyst for investment and a guarantee for risk insurance. This guarantee is given by continually adding value to works in museums, by the “heavy rotation“ movement in which they are entered. The speed with which postcapitalist values are ​​established is an effect of the global financial crisis that needs to find alternative areas for financial security such as art and other luxury industries. Museums of contemporary art, generically called by Hito Steyerl “Global Guggenheim”, serve the same role as the stadiums for sporting events. For an artist to be professional, he must play on these “stadiums“ of the art world, whether they are called Guggenheim, MOMA, Pompidou or Tate. A goal scored from a gate made ​​of two backpacks on a green space is like an exhibition in a gallery in Bucharest or Tehran. The professional peek of an artist’s career is to be exhibited, circulated and purchased by a museum of contemporary art. The museum guarantees the value (risk reduction), creates the landmarks of artistic value and 18 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013 indirectly credits the high growth potential. The “betting agencies“ in the art world - auction houses, the public who buys tickets and secondary derivatives such as gadgets, the media industry, the publishing industry and the art books industry are found in synergy when a contemporary artist reaches the peak of his career. The Museum Trustees or the people in the boards of museums form a network of collectors who contribute through financial donations or art objects to the collections of the museums. The taste, the personal collection and the financial support form a system of interests connecting selected galleries with museums (private collections fuel public museum collections). The Agency-Gallery The gallery is the agency that commissions artistic values and guarantees them ​​by associating them with its own brand, which it seeks to strengthen and impose on permanent basis. The gallery works with a portfolio of artists organizing exhibitions and transactions. For most of the galleries, selling works of art also means promotion. The gallery marks the fields of production and the fields of consumption and seeks and finds an audience that reacts to the artistic product. The gallery creates a critical mass of small and medium collectors allowing the artist to continue his career and feeding private collections. The art dealer Art dealers are like capital markets brokers, they are people who have contacts and knowledge of the specific market. They may represent different interests (galleries, collectors, private museums). Art dealers do not invest in cultural promotion and are aware of the economic capital, not the cultural one. For them, finding artistic products is done ​​by systems similar to head-hunters. The traded artists’ pool is higher than that of a gallery, and involvement in promoting art is reduced. Art fairs By increasing standards, art fairs were positioned at the level of the luxury goods industry. Sets of conditions and filters allow
  19. 19. DEBATE access only to certain galleries and networks of galleries in order to show and sell the production and the artistic portfolios. The transactions in the art fairs, like those of auction houses, aim to maximize profit (increasing economic and cultural capital by circulation and recognition). Auction houses Auction houses make up the secondary market segment in which art is sold as it exits the gallery circuit (considered as primary market). The mechanisms of auction houses form, by public sale, the art market quota system. Indexed art market quotas are processed and provide financial tools as the performance of artists and of art works (see www. artprice.com). The works can get to auction houses through private sale, expropriation, transformation into liquidity etc. The houses do not sell under the market price and seek a significant appreciation per unit traded. Thus, successive resale results in maximizations of the economic and cultural capital. This increase is favored by a closed environment, achieved through careful selection of the works and batch control. When a campaign for an exhibition is activated, the main target of reporting is, as in any other branch of industry, the financial one. To this there are added other types of indicators: cultural, educational, media, etc. In quantifying a marketized public, the amount (rather than the quality) of participation in artistic consumption becomes more important. Art consumption is stimulated by large scale events, such as Biennales, art projects in the public space, mammoth museum productions etc. The total visual spectacle, within the tested parameters of the Hollywood model, receives artistic declensions at the level of the budgets. Basically, the entertainment coordinate is one that manages to achieve ambitious targets for tens of thousands of spectators, consumers of artistic events. The artist The success of a contemporary artist is the concentrated work of the production field around him, Investment funds and their returns Photo: DAMIENHIRST.COM The collective financial mechanisms of investment management provide a framework for forming and strengthening the artistic value. Each fund has a growth capacity ensured by the strength of the liquidity of art works in a limited period of time (maximizing economic capital through storage and resale at the best moment).. The public The public of the twenty-first is regarded as a target to be achieved. “For the Love of God“, Damien Hirst, 2007, platinum and diamonds worth 19 million euros, was traded with 75 million euros in order to turn him into a registered and controlled brand on the consumer market. This success requires a team specialized in all branches of the main and related activities: production of works, control of works, organizing exhibitions and events with internal and external logistics, monitoring, legislation on contracts and copyright, national and international quotations, presentation in spaces with closed circuit and open circuit, lobbying for awards and scholarships, advertising, media lobbying, the use of public sales tools, fundraising, attracting capital, constant communication with collectors and investors, making productions for the book industry (books, albums, catalogues) and gadgets for the secondary entertainment industry. At the same time, the power of dissemination and rapid embrace of the patterns by direct imitation shows us the folk component of contemporary art reduced to the industrial control of the artist’s brand. The transaction price of a work must ensure the costs of the team and of all these activities. Without this whole package of services, which must be financially supported, the artist does not become known and is traded at a lower price, often close to the price of the materials used. The material can also be a factor in assessing the final selling price. It is known that during the Quattrocento art works costs were quantified in the amount (ounce) of color used, the most expensive being gold, silver and ultramarine blue. Similarly, contemporary art works in precious metals remain the favorite investments in the arts. (“For the Love of God“, Damien Hirst, 2007, platinum and diamonds worth 19 million euros, was traded with 75 million euros). 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 19
  20. 20. T he global crisis of values with all its derivatives echoes in the global art scene and market. The accelerated capitalization of the art market and the industrialization of artistic production are effects of the economic crises of searches for other units of measurement for capital investment, gold or real estate being no longer sufficient in this currency reporting crisis. The recent interest accelerated by investments in art made possible artistic productions which were gigantic in terms of budget, size and logistics. One may notice that the contemporary culture follows the general structure of the distribution of wealth in the capitalist world, where 3-5% of the participants have control over and dispose of 70-80% of resources (material and immaterial labor, production budgets, state subsidies etc.)7. Just as in the case of other spheres of human activity, art and culture are dominated by fierce competition principles, forcing the majority to be subject to a struggle for subsistence. Museum networks are among the largest supporters and beneficiaries of such artistic productions, together with networks of top international galleries. The phenomenon of contemporary art biennale is extended globally (from Ukraine to South Africa). In times of crisis, these budgets 20 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013 present an impressive increase nourished by the competition of art market giants. The capitalized art market is a good alternative to financial investments in times of crisis. Also, speculation of this economic dimension of art brings new indicators and hierarchies of values similar to those in the sports world. Hyper-productivity ensures huge artistic productions that guarantee emotional shock, in huge events as Biennales, Documenta or Manifesta. The aesthetic and conceptual value extracted by Duchamp and Warhol outside the scope of the art object breaks the couple art object - artistic value. This separation made it possible to integrate the creation in one of the most financially speculated forms in Over one hundred biennial organizations operate around the globe. They often share similar objectives, practices and considerations, from curatorial and artistic strategies to political and economic agendas. Biennial map provided by Biennial Foundation the history of art. The circulation of contemporary art works shows strong financial ties between all participants in the field of production: art producers, art dealers, gallery, art fair, collector, art critic, auction house, museum, publications, etc. Media publications are also financially related to the artistic values promoted in the art market. The art freed from the object crafted by the artist can be speculated with amazing speed globally, making it a financial vehicle of the rich. The exorbitant prices of contemporary art works such as those of Jeff Koons, Damien Hirst, and Takasi Murakami became inaccessible even for the nouveau riche. The financial value of art has become the attribute of Forbes billionaires and is measured in production budgets and teams constantly engaged in the artist‘s studio. The circulation of money in art shows how many of these artistic values are exploited in order to bring direct profit to investors and indirect profit of those involved in supporting the entire circuit. The talent is estimated in the artistic quota indexed in specialized publications that calculate with mathematical algorithms expressing the yield per square centimeter in public transactions. Media participation, PR and marketing are budgeted tools integrated in the artistic production that ensures the curiosity of the public and media interest. Photo: WWW.BIENNIALFOUNDATION.ORG VIII. The competition of art market giants
  21. 21. DEBATE IX. Corrupt art O ne of the observed effects of the industrialization of contemporary art is that art markets can corrupt the artistic act, in different ways. Photo: ARRESTEDMOTION.COM The forms and genres of art are financially distorted by the art market. Banksy is the model of such corruptions, by capitalization the pop success of an anonymous street art phenomenon. Behind the name transformed into a successful brand of the “anti“ attitude there is most likely already a team of artists, PR and communication monitoring transactions and media effects. The huge amounts at which a stencil or graffiti are traded show the anomalies developed by an art market controlled by capital and less by aesthetic values [Banksy‘s record in a public sale is over 1.5 million euros, “Keep it Spotless (Defaced Hirst)“, 2007]. Most times, the ethics of financial systems does not distinguish between money according to their origin. Likewise, the contracts in the art world maintain the confidentiality of customers, routes and sources of money in order not to provoke issues. Black money gets into the world of contemporary art and is a source of deposits. Complex systems generate profits and create values by spectacular sales, lobby for awards, Banksy‘s record in a public sale is over 1.5 million euros, “Keep it Spotless (Defaced Hirst)“, 2007 exhibitions and residencies, donations of collections, rebuying works of art in auctions etc. The art market not subject to taxation seems to be safer in relation to the fiscalized financial mechanisms of the giants of the art industry. The abuses and corruption of cultural managers are new networked phenomena that pervade private and public institutions. Other workers in the creative industries only benefit from the financial results of their work in a small degree and enjoy the audience points which are not controlled by them, but by the abovementioned systems. Opacity in the art world can be a sign of corruption or of speculative construction oriented towards financial profit. Contemporary art is produced, financed and designed for accumulation of surplus - called economic growth. Transforming art into private ownership and profit makes it a product of the elites (i.e. an aristocratic art). Contemporary art forms are thus sophisticated types of social discrimination. In the same way as other products of the luxury industry, huge or eccentric productions of contemporary art have broken the ecological balance with the environment, with responsible consumption and with the ethics of the transaction values. Hito Steyerl is more radical: ”Contemporary art feeds on the crumbs of a massive redistribution of wealth widely, from the poor to the rich, accomplished through a class struggle under way. Guggenheim Global is a cultural refinery for a set of post-democratic oligarchies, as numerous international biennales are responsible for the upgrading and reeducation of the growing population. Thus, art facilitates the development of a new multi-polar geopolitical distribution through the engagement of often ruined economies, fueled by internal unrest, by class conflict, by radical shock and policies of awe. Thus, contemporary art not only reflects but actively intervenes in the transition to a new world post - Cold War. It is a major player in the unequal promotion of pseudo capitalism (...).”6 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 21
  22. 22. X. Alternative systems to the main markets for contemporary art Emerging markets in Eastern Europe Emerging art markets of Eastern Europe still face the historical bottlenecks of the lack of free markets during the communist period, in which the State was the sole sponsor and purchaser of artistic productions. The art trade was restricted to some antique art shops and ranked as prohibitive because it belonged to the ”bourgeois social class“. The communist period left long-lasting marks by denying the commercial role of the artistic product, understood with a pejorative role, and without aesthetic value. The lack of economic value of the art object made it available to be loaded with historical value, with a propaganda or counter-propaganda role. Thus, the contemporary art of the Eastern Europe is profoundly marked historically but has a disastrous financial report. Activists There are activist groups such as ArtLeaks7 that make the 22 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013 purpose of contemporary art to expose the myth that there is no alternative to the global capitalist system and that critical thinking is corrupt. They reconsider the world without the domination of profit and exploitation, from the micropolitical and micro-economic level in the analysis of relations and human creation. The economic, political, intellectual and creative empowerment should not be linked to capitalist or communist political structures. People freed from faith in religion trust science and various disciplines which analyze the world critically. The specialization in the capitalist society places knowledge in the service of the dominant social classes, say the people from ArtLeaks. Individual research serves private interests; therefore research based on critical discourse is not institutionally supported. In principle, critical knowledge should not be comfortable and should be distributed in institutionalized educational systems. Social classes are not structured as bourgeoisie and proletariat. As it evolved, this couple may be reexamined in the antagonism labor and capital. Transforming society reconfigured the productive powers which now require a critical rethinking of strategies and objectives. Contemporary art is a creative space without geographical spatial identity. However, it is taken into account when it is produced by the world powers or super-powers: the art created in the twenty-first century in Kyrgyzstan or in other countries that do not have pavilions at the Venice Biennale, for example, is not an active part in the global history of contemporary art. One may note that only mature markets and art scenes can financially lift creative persons to impose themselves to a wide audience and to a specialized one, of professionals. The options to improve this model can come from within it, by anarchic forms such as strikes, criticism, deinstitutionalization, piracy, etc. (not encouraged) or from the outside, from areas not yet exploited by civilization and cultural industrialization (Eastern
  23. 23. DEBATE Europe, Central Asia, emerging countries etc.). Deinstitutionalized institutions One of the institutions pirated and deinstitutionalized offering the power of example and a case study is the Biennale de Paris (http://biennaledeparis.org/). It is an unusual biennale: after being founded by Andre Malraux in 1959 and abandoned by the French public institutions, its brand was registered and relaunched in 2000 by a team of artistic activists. The Biennale de Paris has kept its name and develops a set of artistic processes, which do not have the cyclical rhythm of a biennale, are not organized as a unique curatorial project, do not have a national space or targeted and fixed audiences. The biennale records various artistic processes (political, economic and ideological), of non-institutional type, in the very place where they are made ​​- anywhere in the world, and communicates them in its publications, which are also irregular. The efforts of the biennale are to deinstitutionalize art and to reject the use of the art object, believed to have become alienated because of the art market. The biennale attempts to redefine art by using criteria reluctant to the idea of an artist in its traditional form (by the manufacturer in the market, surrounded by its field of production). The Biennale de Paris refuses to participate in what is conventional in the art world today. Blending genres, exploring the boundaries and practicing the redistribution of roles, the Biennale de Paris allows art to arise with accuracy especially where it is not expected. Alexandre Guriţă, the director of the Biennale de Paris, defines the art market as a primitive, barbaric market, centered on the art trade. In his opinion, the art market should be centered on the services economy and the social economy. Guriţă proposes a ”provider art“ in which artists work under employment contracts and collaborate with society. These types of events developed by artists in a collaborative way are defined by the Director of the Biennale de Paris as ”invisual artistic practices“. These practices develop creative services and not art objects. And the effects of art are actually the end product of the artistic act. According to Alexandre Guriţă, artists must participate in meetings in public and private institutions and companies that need restructuring, providing views and solutions different from those of experts in the field. The Biennale de Paris is an example in the reverse direction, meaning that the artist is the one who recovers an institution; the institution does not recover the artist, as it usually happens. It is a biennale with no imposed theme, no curator, and no spectator. Art institutions can be reformulated based on artistic practice that questions the foundations of art. Art should not be institutionalized by the Ministry of Culture, a legatee, a regulating factor in the arts and the infrastructures of the cultural arts systems. The terminology of art is associated to the practices of the Biennale de Paris to reopen the investigation of new terms to redefine the new artistic practices. An example of a redefined artistic activity is the artist Elisa Bollazzi, concerned with the development of an artistic exhibition project consisting of micro-collections of broken fragments that belonged to famous art objects. These physical fragments of other works of art are thoroughly indexed and stocked beginning from the time they were (at the limit of legality) decomposed and taken from museums or public spaces. By mixing these fragments, she makes up her own work of art, after an original concept. Economy of sharing, collaborative consumption, Fair Trade Contemporary art, exploited and absorbed by the financial systems can still search for its resources in other concepts such as the economy of sharing, collaborative consumption or fair trade, whose essential feature is the trust between individuals. These new social and economic phenomena refer to markets built on contributory participation among individuals: ”peer-topeer markets“ (already known and commonly used concepts such as ZipCar, Airbnb, CouchSurfing or eBay). -------------------------------------This material is used as a starting point for discussions on the current system of contemporary art. The recording of debates in various cultural areas will add to this material to create a subsequent book. Thank you for all comments, live or at cosmin@cosminnasui. com. Cosmin Năsui, Oana Năsui, August 2012 -------------------------------------- Notes: Ana B obirca, Alina Draghici, Sorin Dumitrescu, ”Measuring Creative Economy– Case study: Romania”, Romanian Economic Journal, 2009 2 DCMS (2001), Creative Industries Mapping Document 2001 (2 ed.), London, UK: Department of Culture, Media and Sport 3 Florin Colceag, http://austega.com/florin/ 4 Pierre B ourdieu, The Rules of Art, Art Publishing House, 2012 5 Michel Maffesoli, Robert D. Putnam, web sourse http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neotribalism 6 Hito Steyerl, Politics of Art: Contemporary Art and the Transition to Post-Democracy, 2010 7 Art leaks, web source http://art-leaks.org 1 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 23
  24. 24. NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY CURATORIAL CONCEPT Colouring the Grey State of Body The state of body represents a more profound and deeper approach of the corporal, visceral identity, specific to Eastern Europe. BY COSMIN NĂSUI R omanian contemporary art has been conissues. “State of Mind” identified a nostalgia expericerned with body representation, since the ence mixed with a certain adaptability complex, a sort 1980’s, often with usage of it as a method of de-individualization. This last part closes the equaof introspection. This approach was the tion, revealing an appetite for the material as well as perfect substitute for the mainstream reality reprefor different forms of body representation. Alienated sentation, highly ideologically converted. Thus, representations or (non)human mutations are favored forms of irony, sometimes of protest and different by the usage of new materials (backlit, steel, foam formulas of displaying the concept of individuality support painting, synthetic resin sculptures, polymer found the perfect support in it, compounds, artificial leather) and during that present time of social by the keenness for experiments About “Colouring the classes’ uniformity strategies. inspired by science and medicine. Consequently, the body became a Grey” curatorial project refuge for a reality ideologically Seven artists bring their internot converted and the corporeality pretations of body, material and »»Nasui private collection&gallery, gathered the present generation’s concept to the Colouring the Grey Bucharest, Romania presents the project interest for a specific form of mateexhibit. “Colouring the Grey” within the Indepenriality. The supermarket shapes other dents Liverpool Biennial 2012, between types of corporal relationships and September 21 and October 21, 2012 in St. George’s Hall, Gladstone and Dickens For the 80’s generation, it is the specific physical desires, studied Galleries. material that gives meaning and by Francisc Chiuariu in his recent »»“Colouring the Grey” curatorial project painting series “Forever Ikea”. significance to the artwork. Most has opened a series of three exhibi­ times, it is it that generates work Bogdan Raţa introduces water tions, by bringing forward the Romanian and, very often, breeds the idea volumetry among the new mateemergent artists in international cultural itself. Rough figurative art, opporials already used in his postspaces, in 2011-2012. site to the official reality, testifies genetic sculpture. New forms of »»The concept illustrates an overview on the East-European identity in tran­ the artist’s intervention through apparently anatomical, organic, sition. gesture, touch, cut, paint, line etc. yet inanimate constructions are »»The first was pre­ ented within s made by Felix Deac from synthetic “Special Projects” section of the Moscow Post 2000 Eastern Europe geneleather, in a hyper-realistic style. Bi­ nnale of Contemporary Art 2011, e ration returns to this legacy, dating Tranzit and perishability repreunder the name ”The Second Wave before the fall of the “Iron Curtain“ sent the states of the body in of Romanian Emerging Contemporary and reinstitutes interesting links Dragoş Burlacu’s new paintings. Artists” (September 2011). over time. Rediscovering corporal Humanism hidden in techno »»Second exhibition was presented in Artists’ House Tel Aviv, the oldest cultufiguration in realistic key is a sfumatto has been the recent ral location in Israel (1934), developping common interest of young artists concern of Aurel Tar. Chiaroscuro the concept of “State of Mind” (Novemfrom Eastern Europe. technique is an artistic effect based ber-December 2011). upon identity researches, present »»The third and last part of the series The first part of the curatoin the paintings of Radu Belcin and is called ”State of Body” and is exporial project, ”The Second Wave...”, Flavia Pitiş and rebuilds, through sed within the Independents Liverpool Biennial 2012. opened the series by reviewing body language, an European idensome Eastern European identity tity. 24 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  25. 25. WWW.INDEPENDENTSBIENNIAL.ORG 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 25
  26. 26. Radu Belcin, ”Untold things”, 2012, oil on canvas, 100 x 80cm 26 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  27. 27. Radu Belcin, ”Self Improvement”, 2012, oil on canvas, 120 x 100 cm 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 27
  28. 28. Dragoș Burlacu, ”Study V”, 2012, 40 x 30 cm, oil on glossy sheet 28 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  29. 29. Dragoș Burlacu, ”Waiting crowd”, 2012, 30 x 66 cm, oil on stainless steel sheet Dragoș Burlacu, ”Study IV”, 2012, 40 x 30 cm, oil on glossy sheet 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 29
  30. 30. Dragoş Burlacu, ”Beyond reflection”, 96 x 66 cm, oil on stainless steel sheet 30 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  31. 31. Dragoş Burlacu, ”Beyond reflection”, 96 x 66 cm, oil on stainless steel sheet 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 31
  32. 32. Francisc Chiuariu, ”Outdoor summer 6”, 2011, oil & ink on backlit, 80 x 120 cm Francisc Chiuariu, ”Outdoor spring 2”, 2011, oil & ink on backlit, 80 x 120 cm 32 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  33. 33. Francisc Chiuariu, ”Forever Ikea IV”, 2011, oil on canvas, 80 x 120 cm Francisc Chiuariu, ”Forever Ikea V”, 2012, oil on canvas, 80 x 120 cm 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 33
  34. 34. Felix Deac, ”Eidetic 2”, 2010, silicon, poly rubber, make-up, mixed media, 32×22×18 cm Felix Deac, ”Agglomeration”, 2011, silicon, poly rubber, make-up, mixed media, 5×40×30 cm 34 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  35. 35. Felix Deac, ”Eidetic 1”, 2011, silicon, poly rubber, make-up, mixed media, 18 x 13 x 15 cm 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 35
  36. 36. Flavia Pitiș, ”Overpassing the past”, 2012, oil on canvas, 80 x 100cm 36 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  37. 37. Flavia Pitiș, ”Soul learning to live II”, 2012, oil on canvas, 120x100cm 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 37
  38. 38. Aurel Tar, ”Tempelhof Necklace 2”, 2012 acrylic on canvas, 120 x 120 cm Aurel Tar, ”Luise red kissBerlinicus series”, 2012 acrylic on canvas, 120 x 120 cm 38 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  39. 39. Aurel Tar, ”Wonderful collapse”, 2012, 4 pannels, each 80 x 150 cm, modular painting 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 39
  40. 40. 40 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  41. 41. Photo OXANA TORNOREANU Bogdan Raţa, ”Trying to Keep Life”, 2012, polyester, synthetic resin, fibre, paint, metal, water, 153 x 36,5 x 17 cm 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 41
  42. 42. 42 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  43. 43. Photo OXANA TORNOREANU Bogdan Raţa, ”Trying to Keep Life”, 2012, polyester, synthetic resin, fibre, paint, metal, water, 153 x 36,5 x 17 cm 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 43
  44. 44. Bogdan Raţa ”Round and Round”, 2012, polyester, synthetic resin, fibre, paint, metal, 105 x 86 x 41 cm 44 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  45. 45. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 45
  46. 46. 46 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  47. 47. Felix Deac ”Artificial Life 01”, 2011, silicon, poly rubber, make-up, mixed media, 150 × 170 × 70 cm, page 46 - details 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 47
  48. 48. Felix Deac ”Dead Pillow”, 2011, silicon, poly rubber, make-up, mixed media, 18 x 38 x 38 cm page 49 - details 48 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  49. 49. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 49
  50. 50. Photo: CRISTIAN TODIE Cristian Todie, ”Volume 2D”, 2012, folded paper 50 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  51. 51. WWW.ART-THEORIQUE.COM FOCUS Introducing Theoretical Art My «theoretical art» concentrates on the aesthetics of theory and on its artistic potential. BY CRISTIAN TODIE Photo: CRISTIAN TODIE A ccording to Leonardo da Vinci, art must be based on a theoretical knowledge of nature. That is also the case for me, but it is essential to remember that theoretical and mathematical values are perishable. My «theoretical art» concentrates on the aesthetics of theory and on its artistic potential. Building a personal creative universe is essential to the authenticity of works of art. In 1977, it became clear to me that having a vision based on the three existing dimensions and the singular dimension of time would prevent me from developing a truly new and original work. To tie the world of general relativity to the quantum universe, physics theories add new dimensions to the four existing dimensions in order to open new horizons. In search of new artistic matter, I adopted the opposite method, that of reducing the number of dimensions. The industrial process ”Folding Volume 2D” proposed in February 2012 as well as the ”Volume 2D” patent obtained 10 years ago exist as theoretical art that, in addition to their originality and novelty essential to their patentability, are based on the idea that a geometric space with memory, with parameters that differ from the metric nature of objects in the printing world, is the ideal universe for experimentation. The image reproduced on a stack of sheets appears projected trapped in the mass of paper. One can imagine in reference to this spatial volume that each of the parallel levels memorizes the whole of the volumetric and chromatic values that pass through it and that the intervals between these images from one level to another contain a space-time value that reveals the direction of the movement. In the hopes of going back to the origins of these forms and volumes, the mathematical memory of this mass provides for experimental manipulations that, through spatial fractures, projects the original object into another space, that of a parallel reality. This medium, provided by the printing industry, once intelligently folded or sliced, allows for the image and original forms to reappear in refractions, reflections and volumetric anamorphoses. The works resulting from this process help spectators become accustomed to a new mathematic vision. MY CREATIVE UNIVERSE CONTAINS: 2 SPATIAL DIMENSIONS & 1 SPACE-TIME DIMENSION MY ARTISTIC ACT IS A FRACTURE OF SPACE-TIME, THE OPENING OF AN ESCAPE HATCH FROM OUR CURRENT REALITY MY WORK’S MEDIUM IS MATHEMATICAL MEMORY Cristian Todie SCULPTOR, PAINTER, INVENTOR LIVES AND WORKS IN PARIS, SINCE 1978. HE IS THE PROMOTER OF THEORETICAL ART. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 51
  52. 52. Cristian Todie, ”Volume 2D”, 2012, simulation 52 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  53. 53. Cristian Todie, ”Volume 2D”, 2012, folded paper 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 53
  54. 54. Cristian Todie, ”Volume 2D”, 2012 54 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013
  55. 55. Cristian Todie, ”Volume 2D”, 1999-2002 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 55
  56. 56. NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY ARTISTS SELECTED BIO Dragoș Burlacu Bogdan Rața Dragoș Burlacu balances in wide rage of styles and painting techniques, from new expressionism to bad art and realism. Burlacu perfected a manner of visual rendition, by which he simplifies narration and figurativeness in order to capture the emotion of the characters’ relationships. Dragoş Burlacu removes the details of portraits in “Royal Couple”, “Erasing Light”, “Unknown” or “The Colour is in the Shadow” so he would not divert the focus from the outlined beauty of the relationships intimately creating themselves beyond the physical presence of the characters. Bogdan Rața is a sculptor from the young generation of the artists. His new hybrid realism is finding new genetic forms of human anatomy in search of a new posthumanism. Raţa multiplies human parts (fingers, ears, and so on) and combines them into new life forms. The newborn creatures seem to result from strange experiments with the human body in an esthetics lab. Rața’s works forge a contextual change of the anatomic detail through its obsessive multiplication. The materials used, and the resulting industrial look, question the assault on individual personality in a climate of commercial branding uniformity. 1978 – born in Bacau, RO 2010 – ”Why the black is not 1984- born in Baia Mare, RO 2009 – ”Young Romanian Art # teaches at the West University of Timisoara, Romania, Faculty of Arts and Design, Sculpture Department EDUCATION 1997-2002 – B.A., Luceafarul Art Academy, Bucharest white”, Actionfields Gallery, Bruxelles, BE 2006-2008 – M.A., National University of Art, Bucharest, RO 7” Romanian Institute for Culture and Humanistic Research, Venice, IT, curator Mircea Nicolae 1999 – Founder of the group 2009 – ”7 actual size”, Visual E((O Arts Center, Bucharest, RO SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2008 – ”Colonia”, Apollo Gallery, EDUCATION 2012 Ph. D. , West University of Timisoara, RO 2008 MA , National University of Arts, Bucharest, Romania, Sculpture Department Cadot Gallery, Paris, FR 2010 Al treilea 6, Little Yellow Studio, Bucharest, RO 2010 Buy What You Love, Rema Hort Mann Foundation, Jack Shainman Gallery, New York, USA 2009 Capturing Gil-Gulim II, Slag Gallery, New York, USA 2009 About Bodies, Jecza Gallery, Timisoara, RO 2006 BA, West University of 2009 Atelier in tranzitie, Alb- 2008 – ”Gloria pictura”, Frunzetti Bacau, RO Timisoara, RO, Faculty of Arts and Design, Sculpture Department Negru, The Night of the Galleries, Bucharest, RO 2008 – ”Five daily views”, Vero- 2009 Panorama de l’art roumain, 2006 – ”Insomnia II”, Museum of niki Gallery, Bucharest, RO SOLO SHOWS 2012 rupTrup, with Mihai Zgondoiu, Drouot- Montaigne, Paris, FR 2008 Against All Odds, Slag Gal- 2009 – ”Understanding History”, Bucharest, RO Gallery, Bacau, RO 2008 – ”Sapte” Frunzetti Gallery, Contemporary Art George Apostu, Bacau, RO 2008 – ”Zoomorphic Eleussis” Gallery, Iasi, RO Atelier 030202, The Night of the Galleries, Bucharest, RO 2004 – ”1234…”, Velea Gallery, 2007 – ”New Identities in pain- 2012 Artists of the Month, with ting and sculpture in Romania after 1990”, Dana Gallery, Iasi, RO Francisc Chiuariu, National Museum of Contemporary Art, Bucharest, RO lery, Bucharest, RO 2002 – ”Trafic”, Arta Gallery, Bacau, RO 2006 – ”36 young artists”, ING & 2011 1990 Project: Hand Gun, Hart Gallery, catalogue presented at MNAC, Bucharest, RO Piata Pesei Libere, Bucharest, RO GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2005 – ”Colonia”, Apollo Gallery, use 010 Biennale, FR 2010 God Bless Me, Slag Gallery, New York, USA Bacau, RO 2003 – ”Insomnia”, Apollo Gal- Bucharest, RO 2012 – ”Romania in Paris”, 2004 – ”Identities and Visual Co- American Center for the Arts, Dorothy’s Gallery, Paris, FR 2011 – ”Colouring the Grey – State of Mind”, The Artists’ House, Tel Aviv, IL (book) 2011- ”Colouring the Grey”, Special Projects section, 4th Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art, Artplay Design Centre, Moscow, RU (book) 2011 – ”I am Romanian” Ben Gurion University of Negev, BeerSheeva, IL (catalogue) 2010 – ”Detaliile încep păşind”, Iqonique Class Studio, Bucharest, RO (catalogue) 2010 – ”Ich kenne drei Farben auf Erden / Trei culori cunosc pe lume”, Nassauischer Kunstverein, Wiesbaden, DE (catalogue) 56 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery des: Images of Violence / Violence of Images”, Biennale of Young Artists, Bucharest, RO (catalogue) 2003 – ”Docu-fiction video 2010 In/Out ( Penitenciary), Mulho- 2010 Minimal Feelings, Jecza Gallery, Timisoara, RO 2008 Gene , UNA Gallery, Bucharest, RO project Bucharest”, curator Alina Serban, RO GROUP SHOWS 2003 – ”Beyond photography, lery, New York, USA 2008 International Experimental Engraving Biennale, Palatele Brancovenesti, Mogoșoaia, RO 2007 Visual Eurobarometer, Veci- nity, National Museum of Contemporary Art, ¾ Gallery, Bucharest, RO AWARDS 2011 Prize for Sculpture of The Union of Romania Plastic Artists, offered at The Arad Biennale of Art, Meeting Point, RO 2007 Ex-aequo Prize, Visual Eurobarometer, Vecinity, offered by the Intenational Center of Contemporary Arts, RO Mind, Artists House, Tel Aviv, IL 2001 Colouring the Grey, State of painting”, Galeria Noua, Bucharest, curator Aurora Kiraly, RO 2011 Post Humanism, V-Art 2002 – ”Graduation exhibition”, 2011 Colouring the Grey, Spe- Romanian Parliament Gallery Constantin Brancusi, Bucharest, RO AWARDS 2008 – Award for ”A35”, Union of Visual Artists from Romania 2002 – Prize of the Culture Ministry of Romania, ”Moldavian Art Salons”, RO 2012-2013 Gallery, Moscow, RU cial Project at The Fourt Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art, Moscow, RU 2011 Figure IN/OUT, LC Foundation, Bucharest, RO 2011 Corpul Supravegheat, Victoria Art Center, Bucharest, Romania 2010 Un Regarde Autre... , Farideh Photo: NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY Carturesti, Bucharest, RO
  57. 57. FIND MORE ABOUT THE NEXT CURATORIAL PROJECT ”FUTURE NOW, WORKING TITLE” ON WWW.COSMINNASUI.COM Aurel Tar Aurel Tar is a post-pop visual artist, interested in the subtle mix of the cultural aspects of globalisation. Both the local identity and the multi-culturalism form the substance underlying Tar’s artistic statement. In his recent series “Wonderful Outskirts”, the frame is expanded and the works confront different cultural, geographical and historical identities by means of overlaying and juxtaposition. The innovative results are an equal match to those from the series of unexpected encounters of a “sewing-machine and an umbrella on an operating table”. In Tar’s case, the encounters are between Titian, Pre-Raphaelites and a Boeing aircraft. Francisc Chiuariu Francisc Chiuariu’s latest series revolutionises the space of the painting, decomposing it in different layers: on the front oils, on the back typographic inks. The “Outdoor” project of Francisc Chiuariu selects a series of individuals captured in their daily journey. The street scene as recorded by Francisc Chiuariu represents the common collective space and the way it is assumed and used by pedestrians. Francisc Chiurariu draws attention upon the postmodern process of individual disintegration within the collective space. 1973 – born in Sebes, Alba, RO 1999 – member of Romanian ITSCH & ROU”, The Practice – Leo Burnett Group, Bucharest, RO 1966 – born in Sibiu, RO Cosmin Nãsui, V-Art Gallery, Moscow, RU 2006 – Group Exhibition, ”Roll Up EDUCATION 2011- ”Colouring the Grey”, curator EDUCATION Art”, Bucharest, RO 1997-1998 – M.A. study of 2005 – Group Exhibition, Le Saint- 1993, B.A., National University Ex, Itaewon-Dong, Seoul, KR Visual Artists Union University of Art and Design, ClujNapoca, RO 2005 – Group exhibition, ”EUROPE 1991-1997 – B.A. The University of Art and Design, Cluj-Napoca, RO IN ART” HVB Group, Bucharest, Romania, Warsaw, Poland, Hamburg, GE 1995 – Scholarship Nantes, FR 2004 – Personal exhibition, NIK EXHIBITIONS 2012 – ”Romania in Paris”, Ame- of Art, Painting department, Bucharest, RO TEACHING: 1993-2000, National University of Art, Painting department, Bucharest, RO 2003 – Personal exhibition, Ger- 2012 – ”Shadows”, AnnArt Gallery, Bucharest, RO (catalogue) 2012 – ”Outdoor”, Cultural Center Iconique Class Studio, Bucharest; Maison Maitresse Store, Cluj, RO (catalogue) Bucharest, RO (book) 2011 – ”Colouring the Grey – State of Mind”, The Artists’ House, Tel Aviv, IL (book) 2003 – Group exhibition, World Trade Center, Bucharest, RO Palatele Brancovenesti Mogosoaia, RO (book) 2002 – Group exhibition, World 2012 – ”January”, National Muse- 2011 – Group Exhibition, ”Percep- tio”, Atelier 030202, Bucharest, RO 2010 – Group Exhibition, ”Detaliile încep păşind”, Bucharest/ ClujNapoca, RO 2010 – ”GIBRALTAR ultraperiferic art corner” itinerant project, Sebes/ Copsa Mica/ Bucharest, RO 2009 – Group Exhibition, ”East/ Photo: NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY West. 20 – Exit and Transfer Information”, Atelier 030202, Bucharest, RO 2009 – Personal exhibition, ”EUROCENTRIC CIRCUS MAXIMUS”, Unicredit Tiriac Bank, Bucharest, RO 2008 – Personal exhibition, ”DOITSCH Proiekt”- RO, Automobile Bavaria, Bucharest, RO 2008 – Personal exhibition, ”DO- ITSCH Proiekt ”- JP, ArtSenzafine & Soakedi Classic Cars, Tokyo, Japan 2007 – Personal exhibition, ”DO- Bucharest, RO (catalogue) 2011 – ”The other body”, Victoria Art Center, RO (catalogue) SOLO EXHIBITIONS man Evangelical Church, Nairobi, KE cial Projects section, 4th Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art, Artplay Design Centre, Moscow, RU (book) 2011 – ”Pour femme”, The Ark, Gallery, Seoul, South Korea rican Center for the Arts, Dorothy’s Gallery, Paris, FR 2011- ”Colouring the Grey”, Spe- Cosmin Nãsui, Special Projects section, 4th Moscow Biennale of Contemporary Art, Artplay Design Centre, Moscow, RU (book) Trade Center, Bucharest, RO 2002 – Exhibition cooperation with HVB Bank Bucharest, RO 2001 – Group exhibition, ”Visionen 2001” Bad Kissingen, DE 2001 – Exhibition cooperation with U Art gallery/Uzinexport Bucharest, RO 2000 – Group exhibition, UAP gallery, Cluj-Napoca, RO 2000 – Group exhibition, TIAV, Bucharest, RO 2000 – Personal exhibition ”Ambient abstract”, BCR.-Sebes, Alba, RO 1999 – Exhibition cooperation with Bank Austria, Creditanstalt Bucharest, RO 1997 – Group exhibition, UAP gallery, Cluj-Napoca, RO 1996 – Group exhibition, UAP gallery, Cluj-Napoca, RO 1996 – Group exhibition, The Art Museum, Piatra Neamt, RO 1996 – Academy 70, UAP gallery, Cluj-Napoca, RO 1995 – 75 anniversary years of ”Ioan Andreescu” Institute, UAP gallery, Cluj-Napoca, RO um of Contemporary Art, (MNAC), Bucharest, RO 2010 – ”Networks”, Atelier 030202, Bucharest, RO (catalogue) 2007 – ”Obsession”, Quasar Gallery, Bucharest, RO (catalogue) 2002 – Art Jazz Club, Bucharest, RO 2001 – Hanul cu Tei Gallery, Bucharest, RO 2001 – Caminul Artei Gallery, Bucharest, RO 1998 – Hungarian Cultural Center, Bucharest, RO 1993 – Galeria Noua, Bucharest, 2011 – ”Perceptio”, Atelier 030202, 2010 – ”Detaliile încep păşind”, 2010 – ”4 generations under the same roof”, Hotel Capital, Bucharest, RO (catalogue) 2010 – ”Coșmaruri contemporane”, curator Olivia Nițiș, Atelier 030202, Bucharest, RO 2010 – ”10 for the decade X”, Bucharest City Gallery, RO CRINUL GROUP 1999 – Bancorex, RO 1998 – Galeria Cuhnia – Cultural Center Palatele Brancovenesti Mogosoaia, RO 1997 – Casa Enescu, RO 1996 – Curtea Veche, RO RO 1992 – Art Museum, Roman, RO GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2012 – ”Romania in Paris”, Ame- rican Center for the Arts, Dorothy’s Gallery, Paris, FR 2011 – ”Colouring the Grey – State of Mind”, curator Cosmin Nãsui, The Artists’ House, Tel Aviv, IL (book) 2011 – ”Post Humanism”, curator 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 57
  58. 58. NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY ARTISTS SELECTED BIO Radu Belcin Flavia Pitiș Radu Belcin catches attention by new associations of characters, or objects, in a chiaroscuro-painted atmosphere. Starting the quest from the expression of reality study, Belcin explore the identities of the individual and of the present. Radu Belcin crops the image of faces in “It’s Cold beneath the Moon”, “A Hand Full of Hands”, removes the elements of portrait in “Illusion of a Day”, “The Wish”, hides the faces in “Evening Never Comes”, “Blowing”, “Hope Maker”, “Impossible Dreamland”, and “Full of Ideas”. The faces of the depicted characters cannot be seen; therefore not only they remain anonymous, but they also introduce a surreal sense through the surrounding elements. Flavia Pitiș’s art explores issues of identity and isolation. Her painting does not have the function to represent reality, but to make present what is missing in reality. Most times, Flavia Pitiș realizes this by isolating the subject and his confrontation with the loneliness of the chiaroscuro. Darkness introduces the immaterial, but sensitive forms of expecting something indefinable and outlines the aura of a mysterious presence. The universe of Flavia Pitiș's actions unfolds in rooms without natural light. Painted by using the chiaroscuro technique, these works present actions that seem to be condemned by being made in the dark. 1978 – born in Brașov, RO Grove, Olivepress – Art Factory, Dromonero, Crete, GR (catalogue) 1978 – born in Făgăraș, RO 2009 – Normandia Center, EDUCATION 2008 – artMart, Kunstlerhause, 1997-2002 National University EDUCATION 2002-2003 – postgraduate studies, professor Ștefan Câlția, National University of Art ”Nicolae Grigorescu”, Bucharest, RO 1997-2002 – National Univer- Brasov, RO Cheapart Gallery, Vienna, AT 2006 – The Art Museum, Brasov, sity of Art ”Nicolae Grigorescu”, Bucharest, RO, painting department, professors: Florin Ciubotaru, Valeriu Mladin 1993-1997 – Arts High School, grafic department, Brasov, RO RO OTHER STUDIES RO 2001 – workshop of scenography and Light Moving Academy for Performing Arts, Amsterdam NL, 2001 – workshop of scenography, Toaca Cultural Foundation – Toaca Contemporary Art Studio, Bucharest, RO SOLO EXHIBITIONS 2005 – The Art Museum, Brasov, RO of Fine Arts “Nicolae Grigorescu”, Bucharest, RO OTHER STUDIES 2004 – research scholarship on 2003 – National Theatre, Apollo 2002 – The Art Saloon, Bucharest, and light, Moving Academy for Performing Arts, Amsterdam and Toaca Cultural Foundation – Toaca Contemporary Art Studio 2002 – The Art House Gallery, Bucharest, RO 2002 – ”Selfportraits”, SKC Cultural Centre, Belgrade, RS 2001 – workshop of scenography 2000-2001 – classes at the Fa- culty of Comunication and Public Relations “David Ogilvy” Bucharest 2002 – National Theatre Bucharest, RO 2002 – ”Antediplomã” new media exhibition, UNA Gallery Bucharest, RO 2010 – ”Looking through the 2012 – ”Romania in Paris”, image theory, Firenze, IT Gallery, Bucharest, RO mirror”, The Art Museum, Brasov, RO (with Flavia Pitiș.) 2001 – ”Selfportret” installation, 2007 – Personal exhibition, Kro- Societe Generale, Paris, FR SOLO & GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2012 – ”Sacrifice Generation”, American Center for the Arts, Dorothy’s Gallery, Paris, FR 2011 – ”Colouring the Grey – State of Mind”, The Artists’ House, Tel Aviv, IL (book) 2011 – Europe Gallery, Brasov, RO 2010 – Kunstlerhaus, Vienna, AT 2010 – “Looking through the mirror” Art Museum, Brasov, RO (with Radu Belcin) 2009 – The Mediterranean Olive Grove, Olivepress Art Factory, Crete, GR 2009 – Normandia Business Center, Brasov, RO 2008 – BP Portrait Award, National Gallery, London, UK 2008-2009 – BP Portrait Tour Wolverhampton Art Gallery, Aberdeen Art Gallery, UK, Aberystwyth Arts Center, Wales 2001 - ”Accente și Amprente”, nart Gallery, Brasov, RO 2007 – ”The Royal Procession and other characters”, Europe Gallery, Brasov, RO UNA Gallery, Bucharerst, RO Apollo Gallery, Bucharest, RO 2001 – workshop of scenography 2006 – ”The world from my and Light Moving Academy for Performing Arts, Amsterdam NL, and Cultural Foundation Toaca – The Contemporary Art Studio Toaca, Bucharest, RO GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2000 – ”Expo”, Atelier 35, The Art world”, The Art Museum, Brasov, RO 2000 – ”Selfportret” The Romani- Societe Generale, Paris, FR 2012 – ”Romania in Paris”, Ame- rican Center for the Arts, Dorothy’s Gallery, Paris, FR 2011 – ”Colouring the Grey – State of Mind”, The Artists’ House, Tel Aviv, IL (book) 2011 – Europe Gallery, Brasov, RO 2009 – The Mediterranean Olive 58 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery an Literature Museum, Bucharest, RO 2000 – ”Europe Days”, The Collection Museum, Bucharest, RO 1999 – ”Instalation”, Sala Palatului, Bucharest, RO 1999 – ”Eveniment Van Gogh” performance, National University of Art, Bucharest, RO 2012-2013 Photo: NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY Museum Constanța, RO 2012 – ”Sacrifice Generation”,
  59. 59. Felix Deac ”Exceeding materiality and material conditions, I started to play shaping the forms respecting the logic of the living, intending to give each of my work its own life. Details and textures are taken from the living and real world in order to create a non anthropomorphical compositional whole. My intention is to provide aesthetic qualities to objects and shapes which would offer the public an unexplained existence due to the illusion of living that I create. By the works that I have in mind to exhibit to the audience I am trying to flame visceral reactions, and to put into the game a purely sympathetic and powerful relationship between the viewer and the creation.” - artist statement 1984 - born in Satu Mare, RO 2010 – Collective exhibition with EDUCATION 2010 – Workshop R.I.V.E.R. – R.I.V.E.R. project artists at The Ark – Bucharest, RO 2009 – present - PhD studies 2007 – 2009 Master studies in Ancona – Rosora, IT various tehnics Paris, FR 2003 – 2007 ’’Ion Andreescu’’ 2009 – solo show – ’’Made of...’’, University of Arts and Design from Cluj Napoca, RO, Sculpture section, investigation in sculpture and drawing tehnics 1999 – 2003 ’’Aurel Pop’’ Art Highschool Satu Mare SOLO & GROUP EXHIBITIONS 2012 – January, ”Artificial Life”, solo show, Gallery of Visualkontakt art association, Ulm, DE 2011 – December, ”Artificial Life” solo show, Gallery of Visualkontakt art association, Oradea, RO 2011 – October, Youg Art Show *YAS* group exhibition in House of Art, Piestany, SK 2010 – ’’Life’’, solo show, Laika Gallery, Cluj Napoca, RO 2010 – Workshop in Louvre, Cluj Napoca, RO 2009 – National Biennale ‘‘Bronze Age’’/‘’Vîrsta de Bronz”, Cluj-Napoca Art Museum, Group exhibition, RO 2007 – Beginning the Master level studies at the University of Arts and Design of Cluj Napoca, RO 2006 – With Erasmus program, studying 5 months at University of Fine Arts in Bilbao, ES 2006 – Cluj Napoca ’’Bronze Age’’ Group exhibition (almost 100 bronze sculptures), RO 2004, 2005 – ‘’Fontana Group” Satu Mare Collective yearly exhibition of local artists, RO 2003 – ‘’InterArt” Satu Mare, Group exhibition, RO Năsui Private Collection & Gallery @ Preview Berlin 2012 & Berlin Art Week Năsui private collection&gallery presents carefully selected Romanian contemporary artists and holds the debate ”The Soft Power of the Art Market” (details on www.cosminnasui.com). Radu Belcin catches attention by new associations of characters, or objects, in a chiaroscuro-painted atmosphere. Francisc Chiuariu’s lattest series revolutionises the space of the painting, decomposing it in different layers: on the front oils, on the back typographic inks. Bogdan Rața is a sculptor in search of new human genetic forms. He uses new materials as polystyrene, industrial paint, plaster, synthetic resin. Aurel Tar is a post-pop visual artist, interested in the subtle mix of the cultural aspects of globalisation. Radu Belcin & Flavia Pitiș, Faces & Traces - Vellant Publishing House 2012 This book brings together the artworks of two young and emerging artists, offering an inedite perspective of seeing original and simultaneous creations: the artists Radu Belcin and Flavia Pitiș work and live together (in private, they are husband and wife and have two children). Technical details: hardcover, 176 pages, A4 format, 174 plates, full color Francisc Chiuariu, monograph Vellant Publishing House 2012 The creation of Francisc Chiuariu already covers almost a quarter of a century overlaying the temporal coordinates of the end of the 80es, the decade of the 90es and the years after 2000. Technical details: hardcover, 168 pages, A4 format, 245 plates, full color Photo: NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY You can find us at booth 54: 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 59
  60. 60. NĂSUI PRIVATE COLLECTION & GALLERY PARTNERS St George’s Hall ”Colouring the Grey - State of Body” presents seven contemporary artists within the Independents Liverpool Biennial 2012 and is proudly hosted in St. George’s Hall, Gladstone and Dickens Galleries. S t George’s Hall is a Grade 1 listed building at the Sayers, PD James and Raymond Chandler and was mentiheart of Liverpool’s cultural quarter, part of a oned in US crime drama CSI. UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s widely regarThe Hall has held 100s of events through the years, ded as one of the finest neo-classical buildings including Liverpool’s first motor show, dances, bazaars, in the world and was described by Nickolaus Pevsner as fairs, ice rinks and sporting events such as boxing matches ‘the finest neo-Grecian building in England and one of and squash tournaments. the finest in the world.' Former poet laureate Sir John Famous visitors to the building include Queen Victoria Betjeman listed the building among the 10 he would die for in 1851 who said the building was ‘worthy of ancient and viewed it as ‘the finest secular hall in England.’ Athens’, Charles Dickens who gave a number of public The Hall opened in 1854 as a civic building for the readings in the Concert Room, which he described as being purposes of the law courts of Liverpool and to serve as ”the most perfect room in the world” and Liverpool-born a venue for the town’s music festivals and other public 4 times Prime Minister William Gladstone who was given purposes. the Freedom of the City in the Hall in 1892. The Hall is the combination of 2 separate buildings: a St George’s Hall also houses the third largest organ in music venue and a court building that were designed by the UK with 7737 pipes. the same architect, Harvey Lonsdale In 1984, when the law courts of Elmes. Liverpool were moved to the new The exhibition is Elmes laid scale drawings of Queen Elizabeth II Courts in Derby Birmingham’s New Town Hall and St Square, the Hall was ‘mothballed’ due accompanied by Paul’s Cathedral in London to display to a lack of purpose and funding, and “The Soft Power of that St George’s Hall would eclipse fell into a state of disrepair. both in terms of size and design. However, following a £23m restothe Artmarket”, a Over the years the Hall played ration project that was completed in debate on systems host to numerous famous court cases 2007, the Hall was reopened on St such as the trial of Florence Maybrick George’s Day that year by another of and mechanisms of (whose husband, James, is a Jack the the contemporary art its admirers, Prince Charles, and has Ripper suspect) and William Wallace: become a grand focal point for cultural, industry. ‘the man from the Pru’, who has been community, civic, corporate and written about by the likes of Dorothy performing arts activities once more. In brief: The visionaries behind the names DICKENS GALLERY GLADSTONE GALLERY A STATUE OF GLADSTONE STANDS IN THE GREAT HALL Liverpool-born 4 times Prime Minister William Gladstone was given the Freedom of the City in the Hall in 1892. A statue of Gladstone, erected in 1872, stands in the Great Hall of St. George's Hall, Liverpool. 60 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013 Photo: ST GEORGE’S HALL ”THE MOST PERFECT ROOM IN THE WORLD” Charles Dickens gave a number of public readings in the Concert Room, which he described as being ”the most perfect room in the world”.
  61. 61. 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 61
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  63. 63. Chapman Taylor is an international practice of architects, masterplanners and interior designers operating from 17 regional offices and with experience of working in over 70 countries around the world. As a company with an international network of offices we pride ourselves on our ability to effectively balance our knowledge of working internationally with a sensitivity to local experience, environment and culture. Our various regional companies work as a cohesive group and can pool skills and resources as required to provide the best possible service to our clients while always aiming to produce bespoke design solutions for all our projects. The mission is to deliver high quality designs and commercially viable schemes that exceed client expectations and provide awardwinning sustainable environments that people enjoy. www.chapmantaylor.com 2012-2013 Năsui Private Collection & Gallery | 63
  64. 64. FUTURE NOW WORKING TITLE 2013-2014 The curatorial concept gathers synergies from the two fields of creation: art and science. The theoretical framework searches for common grounds for the both, in order to stimulate the contemporary creativity. 64 | Năsui Private Collection & Gallery 2012-2013 Artists and researchers, inventors and business visionaries, scientific academics and young experimental artists will be brought together to create unexpected art & science works. MORE TO COME ON COSMINNASUI.COM PHOTO: DRAGOȘ B URLACU ”UNDEFINED STATE”, OIL ON STAINLESS STEEL SHEET, 46 X 56 CM ARTISTS & INVENTORS

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