Pruning Shrubs part2

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Pruning Shrubs part2

  1. 1. Pruning permanent frameworkGenerally assume regular shape Ceanothus „Julia Phelps‟ Pieris „White Cascade‟
  2. 2. Many of these plants form a dome-shaped canopy
  3. 3.  Remove: • dead • damagedCistus „Silver Pink‟
  4. 4. LavenderLavandula spp.
  5. 5. Removal of errant shoots help shape
  6. 6. “Cubist” pruning is common…
  7. 7. Or, the meatball variation…
  8. 8. Think about flowering time before pruning!
  9. 9. Pittosporum tenuifolium„Silver Sheen‟
  10. 10. Shearing removes form, but hopefully not flowers… Arbutus unedo (Strawberry tree)
  11. 11. Pruning subshrubs  have woody base, but bloom on current season‟s shoots  some become larger and more woody in mild climates  avoid pruning until after risk of severe freeze Buddleia nivea
  12. 12. Small subshrubs which may be sheared: Epilobium canum Penstemon pinifolius
  13. 13. Remove most shoot growth to baseAugust 2010 January 2011
  14. 14. Before… After…
  15. 15. Larger subshrubs… Caryopteris x clandonensis Perovskia atriplicifolia
  16. 16. Spiraea
  17. 17. Large subshrubs Buddleia „Pink Delight‟ Heptacodium miconioides
  18. 18.  Remove dead stems, prune hard in springLavatera: early spring 10 minutes work!
  19. 19. Note where cuts made… Look how much growth is removed!
  20. 20. Later…
  21. 21. Heptacodium miconioides
  22. 22. Suckering shrubsNaturally thicket-forming plants  Includes: • Aralia spp. • Clerodendrum spp. • Kerria japonica • Rhus spp. • Rubus spp. • Symphoricarpos spp. • Syringa vulgaris • Zenobia pulverulenta  Dig suckersRhus typhina „Laciniata‟  Use barriers
  23. 23. Pruning ConifersFor pruning purposes, there are two types:Needle-like leaves Scale-like foliageWhorled branches Random branches
  24. 24. Needle-foliage Conifers: Pine Family Abies: The Firs Cedrus: True Cedars Picea: The Spruces Pinus: The Pines Pseudotsuga: Douglasfir Tsuga: The Hemlocks
  25. 25. When sited correctly, rarely need pruning Abies pinsapo „Glauca‟ Pinus thunbergii „Thunderhead‟
  26. 26. The biggest mistake: pruning into un-needled growth
  27. 27. Pine FamilyTo dwarf plant and fill incanopy, pinch back newgrowth at “candle” stageDo not cut into old, un-needled parts of stem!
  28. 28. Candles on pines are easily broken at this stage
  29. 29. Candle pruning makes a conifer…  dwarfer  bushier
  30. 30. Some conifers revert as well… Alberta spruce
  31. 31. Scale-foliage Conifers: Cypress Family Calocedrus  Incense Cedar Chamecyparis  Hinoki Cypress Cupressus  Monterey, Italian Cypress X Cupressocyparis leylandii  Leyland Cypress Juniperus  many, many species/forms Thuja  Arborvitae, Western Redcedar
  32. 32. Cypress family plants respond well tolight trimming and make good hedges Don‟t prune into older un-needled parts of plant!
  33. 33. Effects of hard pruning: Cutting back hedge Limbing up too-big shrub
  34. 34. Conifers that respond to cutting to older wood:Taxus: Yews Sequoia: Redwood Cryptomeria: Japanese cedar
  35. 35. Pruning Vines
  36. 36. Pruning need depends on vigor, climbing habit… Wisteria Jasminum x stephanense rampant growing  many thin canes permanent framework  cane-grower
  37. 37. Consider the climbing habit of the plant: Non-clinging plants: Roses
  38. 38. Twining growth habit:Clematis JasminumHumulus TrachelospermumLonicera Wisteria Tendrils: Ampelopsis Passiflora Vitis
  39. 39. Clinging vines Campsis (aerial rootlets)  (will also sucker) Hydrangea anomala (aerial rootlets) Hedera (aerial rootlets) Parthenocissus (tendrils) Schizophragma (aerial rootlets) Little or no pruning required
  40. 40. The support structure and vine must match!
  41. 41. Climbing roses
  42. 42. A trellis can be very simple…
  43. 43. Old trees make a goodmakeshift trellis, too
  44. 44. Climbers-modern: very tall bush roses, repeat renew framework regularly Rambling Roses  annual cane production  train stems flat  remove flowered stems  thin/shorten excess canes
  45. 45. Climbing rosesSpreading out stems horizontally encourages branching
  46. 46. Climbing Rose: „Westerland‟Modern Climberi.e. blooms on new wood
  47. 47. Early spring…
  48. 48. Later…
  49. 49. Rambling Rose „Dorothy Perkins‟ Once-bloomingJune 2004
  50. 50. Sept. 2004 July 2005
  51. 51. July 2006
  52. 52. For a full arbor youwill need to plant onboth sides
  53. 53. Twining vines Clematis armandii
  54. 54. As with other vines,match the vine withavailable space
  55. 55. Over time, many twining climbers form a “mushroom” Jasminum x stephanense
  56. 56. Or, the shape of a TV antenna…
  57. 57. Young vines: shoot placement
  58. 58. Lonicera japonicaIn bloom, June After pruning
  59. 59. Pruning vining ClematisFor pruning purposes, 3 “groups”based on flowering time: Spring: (Group 1) C. armandii, C. montana Repeat bloom: (Group 2) Large-flowered hybrids C. „Nelly Moser‟ Summer-Fall: (Group 3) C. x jackmanii, C. texensis C. paniculata, C. viticella
  60. 60. A simple trellis…
  61. 61. Pruning Clematis-Group 1 and 2
  62. 62. Pruning vines: Clematis Group 2 (and 1)  Remove weak growths Thin stems to well—spaced framework
  63. 63. Pruning Clematis-Group 3
  64. 64. Pruning Clematis Group 3  Prune low to a pair of strong buds early spring  Remove dead stems
  65. 65. Training Wisteria
  66. 66. Trees make handy trellises…
  67. 67. Brickell and JoyceDK Publishing, 1996ISBN 1-56458-331-7
  68. 68. Brown and KirkhamTimber Press, 2004ISBN 0-88192-613-2
  69. 69. Cass TurnbullSasquatch BooksISBN 1570613168
  70. 70. Other references:PlantAmnestyhttp://www.plantamnesty.org/  Pruning tipsPNW-International Society of Arboriculturehttp://www.pnwisa.org/  Pruning information  Publications  Lists of Consulting Arborists
  71. 71. The End!Ceanothus griseus „Kurt Zadnik‟

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