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OSFair2017 Workshop | Building a global knowledge commons - ramping up repositories to support widespread change in the ecosystem

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Eloy Rodrigues, Petr Knoth & Kathleen Shearer showcase the conceptual model for this vision, as well as the role and functions of repositories within this model.

Workshop title: Building a global knowledge commons - ramping up repositories to support widespread change in the ecosystem

Workshop abstract:
The extensive international deployment of repository systems in higher education and research institutions, as well as scholarly communities, provides the foundation for a distributed, globally networked infrastructure for scholarly communication. This distributed network of repositories can and should be a powerful tool to promote the transformation of the scholarly communication ecosystem. However, repository platforms are still using technologies and protocols designed almost twenty years ago, before the boom of the web and the dominance of Google, social networking, semantic web and ubiquitous mobile devices. In April 2016, the Confederation of Open Access Repositories (COAR) launched a working group to help identify new functionalities and technologies for repositories and develop a road map for their adoption. For the past several months, the group has been working to define a vision for repositories and sketch out the priority user stories and scenarios that will help guide the development of new functionalities. The results of this work will be available in the summer of 2017.

This workshop will present the functionalities and technologies for the next generation of repositories and reflect on how these functionalities will be adopted into the existing software platforms. In addition, participants will discuss the important implications for the network layers, and how repositories will uniformly interact with the networks to provide value added services on top of their content.

DAY 3 - PARALLEL SESSION 6 & 7
http://www.opensciencefair.eu/workshops/parallel-day-3-1/building-a-global-knowledge-commons-ramping-up-repositories-to-support-widespread-change-in-the-ecosystem

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OSFair2017 Workshop | Building a global knowledge commons - ramping up repositories to support widespread change in the ecosystem

  1. 1. Building a global knowledge commons - ramping up repositories to support widespread change in the ecosystem Eloy Rodrigues, COAR and U Minho Petr Knoth, CORE Kathleen Shearer, COAR With significant input from COAR Next Generation Working Group
  2. 2. Agenda for today 1. Brief Introduction 2. NGR - User stories and functionalities 3. Draft conceptual model 4. Repository technologies 5. Next steps, implementation and adoption 6. Topics for discussion
  3. 3. COAR’s Vision A global knowledge commons based on a network of open access repositories
  4. 4. • An international association founded in 2009 • Members & Partners: over 120 institutions from 35 countries in Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North and South America Objectives: • Strategic voice for repositories • Interoperability and alignment across regions • Capacity building • Support the development of value added services Who is COAR?
  5. 5. – Working Group launched in April 2016 – The problem: Repositories have not fully realized their potential and function mainly as passive, siloed recipients of the final versions of their users’ conventionally published research outputs – Aim: to identify functionalities and architectures for the next generation repositories within the context of scholarly communication Next generation repositories
  6. 6. Vision To position repositories as the foundation for a distributed, globally networked infrastructure for scholarly communication, on top of which layers of value added services will be deployed, thereby transforming the system, making it more research-centric, open to and supportive of innovation, while also collectively managed by the scholarly community. Next generation repositories
  7. 7. Objectives •To achieve a level of cross-repository interoperability by exposing uniform behaviours across repositories that leverage web-friendly technologies and architectures, and by integrating with existing global scholarly infrastructures specifically those aimed at identification of e.g. contributions, research data, contributors, institutions, funders, projects. •To encourage the emergence of added-value services that use these uniform behaviours to support discovery, access, annotating, real-time curating, sharing, quality assessment, content transfer, analytics, provenance tracing, etc. Next generation repositories
  8. 8. Next Generation Repositories Working Group Eloy Rodrigues, chair (COAR, Portugal) Andrea Bollini (4Science, Italy) Alberto Cabezas (LA Referencia, Chile) Donatella Castelli (OpenAIRE/CNR, Italy) Les Carr (Southampton University, UK) Leslie Chan (University of Toronto at Scarborough, Canada) Chuck Humphrey (Portage, Canada) Rick Johnson (SHARE/University of Notre Dame, US) Petr Knoth (Open University, Jisc, UK) Paolo Manghi (CNR, Italy) Lazarus Matizirofa (NRF, South Africa) Pandelis Perakakis (Open Scholar, Spain) Jochen Schirrwagen (University of Bielefeld, Germany) Daisy Selematsela (NRF, South Africa) Kathleen Shearer (COAR, Canada) Tim Smith (CERN, Switzerland) Herbert Van de Sompel (Los Alamos National Laboratory, US) Paul Walk (EDINA, UK) David Wilcox (Duraspace/Fedora, Canada) Kazu Yamaji (National Institute of Informatics, Japan)
  9. 9. Principles • Distribution of control • Inclusiveness • Public good • Intelligent openness • Sustainability Next generation repositories
  10. 10. Design assumptions • Focus on the resources themselves, not just associated metadata • Pragmatism • Evolution, not revolution • over configuration • Engage with users where they are Next generation repositories
  11. 11. Next generation repositories Methodology 1.Identify major use cases 2.Determine functionalities/behaviours 3.Develop conceptual models 4.Define technologies and architectures 5.Publish recommendations 6.Support adoption and implementation
  12. 12. Initial Outcomes 12 User Stories made available for public comment from February 7 – March 3, 2017 • More than 60 comments received • Revised version produced • Technical recommendations being developed based on the user stories Next generation repositories
  13. 13. Current Recommendations 12 User Stories made available for public comment from February 7 – March 3, 2017 • More than 60 comments received • Revised version produced • Technical recommendations being developed based on the user stories Next generation repositories
  14. 14. COAR Next Generation Repositories - User stories and current developments Petr Knoth
  15. 15. Next generation repositories working group The aim of this activity is to develop a global network of repositories that allows frictionless access to open content and encourages the creation of cross-repository added-value services.
  16. 16. User stories • Data mining • Discovering metadata that describe a scholarly resource • Discovering the identifier of a scholarly resource • Discovering usage rights • Resource syncing and notification • Recognizing the user • Commenting & annotating • Providing a social notification feed • Recommender systems for repositories • Preservation • Peer-review • Comparing usage https://www.coar-repositories.o rg/files/COAR-Next-Generatio n-Repositories-February-7-201 7.pdf
  17. 17. Current repositories Services we can develop with repositories today Persistence layer Persistence layer Interoperability Interoperability Metadata Usage interactions and metrics Content Links between resources Notifications Global sign-on Comments Peer-reviews Messages Metadata Services we can develop with the next generation of repositories Next generation repositories Conceptual layer Conceptual layer
  18. 18. User stories and priority areas Discovery and exposing resources Batch Navigation Notification Research workflows and lifecycle Annotation Commenting Social interaction Research evaluation Peer review Metrics • Data mining • Discovering metadata that describe a scholarly resource • Discovering the identifier of a scholarly resource • Discovering usage rights • Resource syncing and notification • Recognizing the user • Commenting & annotating • Providing a social notification feed • Recommender systems for repositories • Preservation • Peer-review • Comparing usage
  19. 19. Beyond the metadata record »Content! (manuscript, data) »Links (citations, data citations, relatedness, versions, etc.) »User interaction data »Comments »Messages »Peer-reviews »Annotations
  20. 20. Three vertical discovery mechanisms »Batch – Transferring bulk data »Navigation – Helping robots to find resources in repositories by means of navigation »Notification – Enabling robots to subscribe to changes in repositories
  21. 21. Global sign on As a user, I want my repository to recognize me and other users so that I can be connected with other users who I know, leave comments and be informed of content that is of interest to me
  22. 22. Transparent social network over repositories »What are the components: ›Annotation ›Commenting/social interaction ›Notification feed ›Recommender systems »Novelty: ›All this in a transparent and distributed environment
  23. 23. Research evaluation »Comparing usage: ›addressing the fact altmetrics don’t work yet in the OA world ›Discovery is a key repository function which has a priority over metrics accuracy! »Open citations »Peer-reviews
  24. 24. Conclusions »COAR NGR WG wants to see repositories succeed. To achieve that, the repositories technology needs to be competitive with commercial offerings.
  25. 25. Put in Herbert’s diagram
  26. 26. …repositories are nodes in a larger network, contributing their collective contents to a global knowledge commons on top of which value added services can be built.
  27. 27. Conceptual Model - Core Concepts • Sets of resources each with a URI • Resources may or may not be connected • Connected resources may or may not be physically stored in the same repository • Many different services can mirror, utilize, enhance, enrich, extend, derive (etc.) from the resources • Enable reimagined User Services to interface with global set of resource(s) accessible via URI(s) • Indexes facilitating global registry of objects may or may not be centralized and/or be distributed systems acting together. (TBD)
  28. 28. Andrea Bollini1 & David Wilcox2 1 4Science 2 DuraSpace Repository Technologies
  29. 29. A new level of interoperability In the past years we have focused on interoperability at the Repository level, now we need interoperability at the resource level (and below) Resources need to talk to each other to be reusable, this in turn will make the repositories the basis of a global scholarly ecosystem 29 Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  30. 30. IIIF - http://iiif.io/ IIIF International Image Interoperability Framework is a set of shared APIs to provide access to image based resources in a strongly interoperable way. It is growing in adoption and scope covering now also audio/video and 3D objects. Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  31. 31. IIIF - http://iiif.io/ What Is an Interoperable Resource • Discoverable • Viewable via APIs • Interactive and Manipulable (for tools, analytics) • Citable / Shareable • Mash Up-able • Annotation-ready • With attribution, license and links (back to the image in local context) Credits: Tom Craimer International Image Interoperability Framework
  32. 32. Why is it relevant in the context of the NGR work? It is a concrete example of technology that enables interoperability at the resource level You can combine resources hosted in different repositories at any level of granularity: - Single images in a set - Region of a specific image Other repositories can host additional related resources like web annotation, comments, etc. Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  33. 33. Le manuscrit 5 de la Bibliothèque municipale de Châteauroux, c. 1460 Folio in BVMM Miniature in the BNF Credits: Tom Craimer International Image Interoperability Framework
  34. 34. Put the pieces together
  35. 35. IIIF and Repositories • Several projects are exploring the use of IIIF technologies in the repositories software (DSpace, Fedora, Hydra) https://wiki.duraspace.org/display/DSPACE/IIIF+and+DSpace • Don’t miss my presentation: DSpace for Cultural Heritage: adding support for images visualization,audio/video streaming and enhancing the data model Session: DSpace IG 3: Integrating DSpace Room: Ballroom C Session time: 29/Jun/2017, 3:30pm - 5:00pm 35 Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  36. 36. Dataset – OpenDATA • Datasets need to be usable: preview, sampling, visualization, remote computation & more • OpenDATA: standards formats & APIs required. CKAN provides automatic REST WS on top of your tabular data. Now available also to the DSpace users thanks to the open source DSpace-CKAN integration by 4Science 36 Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  37. 37. Signposting - http://signposting.org/ Signposting is an approach to make the scholarly web more friendly to machines exposing relations as Typed Links in HTTP Link headers The following discovering patterns are currently defined: • Author • Bibliographic Metadata • Identifier • Publication Boundary • Resource Type The Signposting approach is fully aligned with hypermedia (REST, HATEOAS) lines of thinking regarding web interoperability.  (DSpace7 REST – Fedora API) Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  38. 38. Signposting - http://signposting.org/ As an example, Herbert Van de Sompel and Michael L. Nelson are the authors of the paper with DOI https://doi.org/10.1045/november2015-vandeso mpel; their respective ORCIDs are http://orcid.org/0000-0002- 0715-6126 and http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3749-8 116 Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  39. 39. Signposting - http://signposting.org/ curl -I "https://doi.org/10.1045/november2015-vandesompel” HTTP/1.1 303 See Other Location: http://www.dlib.org/dlib/november15/vandesompel/11vandeso mpel.html Link: <http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0715-6126> ; rel="author", <http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3749-8116> ; rel="author" Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  40. 40. Signposting - http://signposting.org/ • The new versions of DSpace-CRIS 5.7 & 6.1 ship with support for the following patterns: – Author – Identifier – Publication Boundary • An issue has been open to track this requirement also for DSpace 7 https://jira.duraspace.org/browse/DS-3589 Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  41. 41. A reflection on the current repositories data model • A revision of the current data model is needed • Precise identification of persons, organizations, projects, concepts and linked resources (dataset, different versions etc.) • Avoid loss of details to allow a fine grain and effective interoperability Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  42. 42. ResourceSync - http://www.openarchives.org/rs/1.1/resourcesync • Successor of the OAI-PMH protocol and much more… • Faster, reliable and scalable • Allows real-time notification (and recovering of missed messages) • Drives resource synchronization: content and metadata are both managed Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  43. 43. ResourceSync - http://www.openarchives.org/rs/1.1/resourcesync A first implementation of resourcesync for DSpace was produced in the past years: https://github.com/CottageLabs/DSpaceResource Sync A ticket now exists to resume such implementation and maybe include in the mainstream: https://jira.duraspace.org/browse/DS-3590 Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  44. 44. ResourceSync - http://www.openarchives.org/rs/1.1/resourcesync The Hydra-in-a-box team tested ResourceSync with the Hyku repository: http://hydrainabox.samvera.org/2017/06/22/reso urcesync.html ResourceSync shows great promise and the team will continue working toward an implementation Andrea Bollini, 4Science / David Wilcox, Duraspace – OR 2017 – Brisbane, Australia
  45. 45. Next Steps 1. Refine the Conceptual Model(s) - for different stakeholder communities 2. Publish recommended technologies (September 2017) 3. Promote adoption of new technologies into repository platforms 4. Support upgrading and adoption of NGRs at the local level 5. Facilitate the development of network services on top of repositories 45 Next generation repositories
  46. 46. 1. What is the best way to engage with the broader community about our vision? 2. How can we get widespread adoption of these functionalities in repositories? 3. What are the most important value added layers to start building on top of repositories? 46 Discussion topics
  47. 47. Thanks! 47

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