ORCID for            Research University Libraries                                                        MacKenzie Smith ...
MIT Faculty Policy on Open Access
Who’s Published What?    • No REF in the USA, so    • Drivers for publication tracking are        – Promotion and tenure c...
Library Workflow    • Search public/licensed article sources by      institutional affiliation    • Try to link results to...
Enter ORCID    • Each academic is assigned an ORCID with associated profile      data known to their institution    • Publ...
Faculty Bibliographies    • Retrospectively, articles need to be linked to      correct ORCID profile    • In ORCID, can b...
Open Access    • Profile data that can be shared (i.e. not private)      SHOULD be shared, openly and freely    • Only nee...
Public Access    • Should be to the ID and (sharable) profile data    • NOT necessarily to complete bibliographies or     ...
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Orcid researchuniversities nov10

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Orcid researchuniversities nov10

  1. 1. ORCID for Research University Libraries MacKenzie Smith Associate Director for Technology, MIT Libraries Science Commons Fellow, Creative CommonsORCID Participants Meeting, November 2010 ©MIT
  2. 2. MIT Faculty Policy on Open Access
  3. 3. Who’s Published What? • No REF in the USA, so • Drivers for publication tracking are – Promotion and tenure cases (infrequent) – Evaluating faculty productivity (ad hoc) • Libraries not usually involved • Current software is evaluation-oriented – e.g. Symplectic, Academic Analytics, Thomson InCitesORCID Participants Meeting, November 2010 ©MIT
  4. 4. Library Workflow • Search public/licensed article sources by institutional affiliation • Try to link results to individual faculty • 80% automatic, 20% manual (i.e. ~200 people) • Expensive, inefficient, fragileORCID Participants Meeting, November 2010 ©MIT
  5. 5. Enter ORCID • Each academic is assigned an ORCID with associated profile data known to their institution • Publishers require ORCID for new article submissions • Search public/licensed article sources by affiliation • Results carry ORCID identifiers and are automatically linked to academic’s publication record (no more ambiguity) • Mandate successfully implemented for prospective publicationsORCID Participants Meeting, November 2010 ©MIT
  6. 6. Faculty Bibliographies • Retrospectively, articles need to be linked to correct ORCID profile • In ORCID, can be done once per paper for all consumers rather than once per consumer • Leverages network of stakeholders, lowers cost to everyoneORCID Participants Meeting, November 2010 ©MIT
  7. 7. Open Access • Profile data that can be shared (i.e. not private) SHOULD be shared, openly and freely • Only need bibliographic data required for author disambiguation • Other research output data (e.g. grants, courses, awards) optional at researcher’s or institution’s discretionORCID Participants Meeting, November 2010 ©MIT
  8. 8. Public Access • Should be to the ID and (sharable) profile data • NOT necessarily to complete bibliographies or other research outputs • Serves as a back end data source to a variety of richer systems at institutions, corporationsORCID Participants Meeting, November 2010 ©MIT

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