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Swimming or Sinking? Laura Solomon Library Services Manager OPLIN [email_address]
Why should we care? <ul><li>Our face to the world </li></ul><ul><li>People often see the site before they see the building...
Why did I do the study? <ul><li>Casual observations </li></ul><ul><li>Questions from colleagues  </li></ul><ul><li>Overall...
Methodology <ul><li>Jakob Neilsen’s 113 points </li></ul><ul><li>Narrowed down to 61 points </li></ul><ul><li>211 library ...
The   Results
Communicating Information About the Library: Are we communicating?
Communicating the Purpose of the Site: Does the site *have* a purpose?
Content Writing:  Do we know  how  to write for the Web?
Credits and Dates: Small but important
Graphic Design:  How do we look?
Graphics & Animation: Are we using these wisely?
Library Specific Issues: Problems often seen on library web sites
Library Specific Issues: Problems often seen on library web sites  (con’t)
LOLcat break
Links : Are we leading the way?
Navigation: Are we making it easy?
Search:   Who has it?
Is it intuitive?
Tools & Welcomes:  Things visitors DON’T WANT
Titles:   They matter
The bottom line
Overall pass rate
Not swimming….
What can we do?
The Two-Minute Offense
What have we learned?
How do users THINK?
Quality counts
Scanning, not reading
<ul><li>NOW </li></ul>
Video <ul><li>http:// www.etre.com/usability/eyetracking/showme / </li></ul>
Users want control
Don’t make users THINK
Make use of effective writing
Don’t be afraid of the white space
Don’t ignore conventions
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Sinking Or Swimming: The State of Ohio Public Library Web Sites

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This is a brief re-hash of the data from a statewide heuristic usability study done by Laura Solomon in 2004.

Published in: Technology, Education
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Sinking Or Swimming: The State of Ohio Public Library Web Sites

  1. 1. Swimming or Sinking? Laura Solomon Library Services Manager OPLIN [email_address]
  2. 2. Why should we care? <ul><li>Our face to the world </li></ul><ul><li>People often see the site before they see the building </li></ul><ul><li>Web sites can lose patrons </li></ul>
  3. 3. Why did I do the study? <ul><li>Casual observations </li></ul><ul><li>Questions from colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>Overall confirmation of perceptions </li></ul><ul><li>A little nuts, maybe. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Methodology <ul><li>Jakob Neilsen’s 113 points </li></ul><ul><li>Narrowed down to 61 points </li></ul><ul><li>211 library sites evaluated </li></ul><ul><li>211 * 61 =12,871 criteria = HEADACHE </li></ul><ul><li>Pass, fail, N/A </li></ul><ul><li>Used Neilsen’s scoring </li></ul>
  5. 5. The Results
  6. 6. Communicating Information About the Library: Are we communicating?
  7. 7. Communicating the Purpose of the Site: Does the site *have* a purpose?
  8. 8. Content Writing: Do we know how to write for the Web?
  9. 9. Credits and Dates: Small but important
  10. 10. Graphic Design: How do we look?
  11. 11. Graphics & Animation: Are we using these wisely?
  12. 12. Library Specific Issues: Problems often seen on library web sites
  13. 13. Library Specific Issues: Problems often seen on library web sites (con’t)
  14. 14. LOLcat break
  15. 15. Links : Are we leading the way?
  16. 16. Navigation: Are we making it easy?
  17. 17. Search: Who has it?
  18. 18. Is it intuitive?
  19. 19. Tools & Welcomes: Things visitors DON’T WANT
  20. 20. Titles: They matter
  21. 21. The bottom line
  22. 22. Overall pass rate
  23. 23. Not swimming….
  24. 24. What can we do?
  25. 25. The Two-Minute Offense
  26. 26. What have we learned?
  27. 27. How do users THINK?
  28. 28. Quality counts
  29. 29. Scanning, not reading
  30. 30. <ul><li>NOW </li></ul>
  31. 31. Video <ul><li>http:// www.etre.com/usability/eyetracking/showme / </li></ul>
  32. 32. Users want control
  33. 33. Don’t make users THINK
  34. 34. Make use of effective writing
  35. 35. Don’t be afraid of the white space
  36. 36. Don’t ignore conventions

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