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Opening Practice on Participatory Course Production - OEPS OE Global17

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Presentation given at OE Global Conference 2017 on 10 March in Cape Town by Anna Page for the Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Project. How can open educational practices be used to enable more learners to benefit from specialist knowledge online in accessible, engaging ways? Opening Educational Practices Project (OEPS) is collaborating with external partners to develop course creation skills they need to deliver their first free, open online courses.

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Opening Practice on Participatory Course Production - OEPS OE Global17

  1. 1. Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Opening Practice on participatory course production Anna Page, Pete Cannell, Ronald Macintyre (OEPS) 10 March 2017 for OE Global CC BY
  2. 2. Opening Educational Practices in Scotland About us The Opening Educational Practices in Scotland project facilitates best practice in Scottish open education. We aim to enhance Scotland’s reputation and capacity for developing publicly available and licenced online materials, supported by high quality pedagogy and learning technology. “”
  3. 3. Opening Educational Practices in Scotland What do we mean by OEP? We think of Open Educational Practices as those educational practices that are concerned with and promote equity and openness. Our understanding of ‘open’ builds on the freedoms associated with “the 5 Rs” of OER, promoting a broader sense of open, emphasising social justice, and developing practices that open up opportunities for those distanced from education. “”
  4. 4. 4 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Working in partnership
  5. 5. 5 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Reasons for engaging with OER • Purpose – may have material to share – their expertise and knowledge of learner context • Existing and potential audience – wider exposure and uptake of their material • Interested in using collaborative supportive networks but need advice • Want guidance on level and tone to suit their audience
  6. 6. 6 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Working in partnership Partnership as a design process* • Explore the Partner’s needs and what they know about the learners • Explain the different types of open courses/OER • Learning through doing – participatory design • Draw out their expertise, they draw on our education expertise • Help them identify uncertainties, build expertise and revise their content • Build their confidence in course creation • Challenge our thinking – for example is existing OER relevant for their context? * Cannell, P., Macintyre, R. and Hewitt, L. (2015) ‘Widening access and OER: developing new practice’, Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning, 17(1), pp. 64-72.
  7. 7. 7 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Models • Curation and supported pathways • Single-authored (one organisation or one person authoring) • Multi-authored (several organisations or several people authoring) • With or without open review ‘Curate’ drawn by Beck Pitt, from Anna Page (OEPS Project) OE Global 2017 CC BY 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/Srhwyj Logo for Writers and Poets Portal, Kontos, Public Domain https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:P_author.svg Working together teamwork puzzle concept, Scott Maxwell CC BY-SA 2.0 https://flic.kr/p/4fUsNL Symbol of Review, Stephen Baum, CC BY-SA 3.0 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Review.png
  8. 8. 8 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Curation and supported pathways Union Learning • Unite are developing their own VLE portal using guidance from OEPS. • This will guide learners to existing OER and help them think about their readiness for online courses and other learning options. • It will also provide guidance for Union Learning Reps about running supported group learning activities in the workplace for learners using existing OERs.
  9. 9. 9 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Single-authored (one organisation) Understanding Parkinson’s • OEPS guided Parkinson’s UK through the process of creating an open course from existing workshop materials which they had previously shared online via PDFs. • OEPS assisted with adapting materials, with Parkinson’s UK approving final content • OEPS assisted with writing the quizzes for assessment as existing questions in workshop materials was geared for face-to-face use only.
  10. 10. 10 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Single-authored (one organisation) My seaweed looks weird • OEPS guided Scottish Association of Marine Sciences through the process of creating an open course about seaweed parasites for a small international postgraduate level audience. • OEPS reviewed the content and provided editorial feedback to authors. • OEPS assisted with writing the quizzes for assessment.
  11. 11. 11 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Multi-authored (single organisation) OEPS – Becoming an open educator • OEPS wanted to write a course about open educational practices • Whole OEPS team collaborated, initial drafts by Beck Pitt revised by whole team after open review • Shared online documents for content authoring • Quiz questions suggested by whole team and refined by Rosemarie McIlwhan and Anna Page
  12. 12. 12 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Multi-authored (2 teams) How to make an open online course • OU expertise in learning design and course production • Course authored by Free Learning Team at The Open University with 2 sections co-authored by OEPS project • Free Learning team and OEPS team collaborated, initial drafts by different team members revised by whole team after review • Shared online documents for content authoring • Quiz questions suggested by authors and refined by two members of the Free Learning team
  13. 13. 13 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Multi-authored (several organisations) Introduction to Dyslexia and Inclusive Practice • Content from several organisations curated and authored by a single person from one organisation • OEPS guided author through the process of creating an open course and helped review the content • OEPS provided advice on quiz writing and reviewed the quiz questions • Already writing two more courses as this is the first of a set of 3 linked courses
  14. 14. 14 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland OEPS open courses so far Created collaboratively with partners • Understanding Parkinson’s http://www.open.edu/openlearncreate/UnderstandingParkinsons Case study at http://www.oeps.ac.uk/create-your-own/building-oer-partnership-understanding-parkinsons Evaluation early findings https://oepscotland.org/2016/07/14/preliminary-findings-evaluation-pilot-cohort-studying-under • My Seaweed looks weird http://www.open.edu/openlearncreate/SAMS_SeaweedWeird • Introduction to Dyslexia and Inclusive Practice – about to be published at http://www.open.edu/openlearncreate/dyslexia-inclusive-practice • Social Determinants of Death – final weeks of production Created collaboratively by the OEPS team with open review • Becoming an open educator http://www.open.edu/openlearncreate/becoming-open-educator • How to make an open online course
  15. 15. 15 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Understanding Parkinson’s • Published April 2016 • By 1 March 2017 there are 527 enrolments • By 1 March 2017 144 badges issued • Course in 5 sections with ungraded practice quizzes at the end of first 4 sections and a graded end of course quiz at the end of section 5. • To receive badge users need to look through all materials and complete the quizzes, passing the last quiz. • Course being used by Health and Social care workers though can also be used by general users interested in knowing more about Parkinson’s and how it is treated and managed
  16. 16. 16 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Understanding Parkinson’s learner feedback Users liked the format of the course • “I found it very good and easy to follow step by step” (Care worker) •“it was easy to understand, information was clear and video interviews were helpful” (Senior social care worker) •“Best online course I’ve done. I’d be very interested in doing more that were set out like this.” (Senior social care worker) •“Good level of information, good mix of written, videos and quizzes to consolidate learning.” (Speech & Language Therapist)
  17. 17. 17 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Understanding Parkinson’s learner feedback • “Thoroughly enjoyed this course. Very informative and the videos were very personnel and definitely added to the learning process.“ (5 stars) Some learners used the downloadable versions of the materials • “I loved being able to download and work on the course offline, it meant I could take it anywhere with me to do a little bit of work when I could.” (Care home manager) • “I found it easier to read the sections this way, just my personal preference.” (Senior social care worker)
  18. 18. 18 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Understanding Parkinson’s learner feedback Some liked the reflective log they were invited to complete as they worked through the course •“I thought it was an excellent way of learning. I really thought the CPD part was a great way of retaining information and perfect for keeping as a reference.” (Senior social care worker) •“The reflective parts were good as it made you really reflect on how you would feel in those situations which I always think is the only way we can really and truly treat every individual.” (Care Home Manager)
  19. 19. 19 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Understanding Parkinson’s learner feedback Some learners said they would change their practice as a result of studying the course •“Will have a better understanding when assessing someone with Parkinson’s for care management. Hope to pass knowledge gained on to colleagues. Important thing I learned is the impact of not getting drugs on time.” (Care Manager) •“Will promote and enable discussion with colleagues and where appropriate with people affected by dementia within my remit where Parkinson’s or Parkinsonism is a feature or a concert, with appropriate signposting to health professionals and support networks.” (Dementia advisor)
  20. 20. 20 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Next steps for Understanding Parkinson’s Parkinson’s UK are: • Running their own survey of learner feedback • Actively promoting the course to their known audience and online via social media • Monitoring learner progress • Writing two new Parkinson’s courses with some advice from OEPS but taking the lead on authoring and production based on their experiences of creating the first course • Building their own quizzes for the new courses
  21. 21. 21 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Becoming an open educator • Published September 2016 • By 1 March 2017 there are 66 enrolments • By 1 March 2017 12 badges issued • Course in 5 sections with ungraded practice quizzes at the end of first 4 sections and a graded end of course quiz at the end of section 5. • To receive badge users need to look through all materials and complete the quizzes, passing the last quiz.
  22. 22. 22 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Becoming an open educator feedback • “Great course, lots of attention to detail and practical application in becoming an Open Educational Practitioner ... and you get a lovely open digital badge (what's not to love ?)” (4 stars) (Debbie Baff) • “Awesome!!” (5 stars) (Nikesh Balami) • (5 stars) (Anil Mathew) • Promoted so far via twitter, blog posts and OEPS newsletter • Honourable mention 2017 @OEConsortium awards
  23. 23. 23 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland How to make an open online course • Published November 2016 • By 1 March 2017 there are 21 enrolments • By 1 March 2017 3 badges issued • Course in 10 sections with an ungraded practice quiz after section 5 and a graded end of course quiz at the end. • To receive badge users need to look through all materials and complete the quizzes, passing the last quiz. • Promoted so far via twitter, blog posts and OEPS newsletter
  24. 24. 24 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland My seaweed looks weird • Published May 2016 • By 1 March 2017 there are 16 enrolments • By 1 March 2017 5 badges issued • Course in 3 sections with an ungraded practice quiz after section 1 and a graded end of course quiz at the end. • To receive badge users need to look through all materials and complete the quizzes, passing the last quiz. • Course written for a very specific small specialist audience
  25. 25. 25 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland How can the OEPS experience of collaborative partnership be reused by others?
  26. 26. 26 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Development of new content and new practices Practice based knowledge Practice based knowledge Technical capability Technical capability OEPS team Partner Academic knowledge Academic knowledge Collaboration via adapted course team methodology Collaboration via adapted course team methodology Skills in educational design Skills in educational design Intellectual property Intellectual property Quality processes for production Quality processes for production LearnersLearners NetworksNetworks Contributions
  27. 27. 27 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Development of new content and new practices Quiz co- authoring Quiz co- authoring Video editing (use external contractor) Video editing (use external contractor) OEPS team Partner Advice and guidance Advice and guidance Current roles and responsibilitiesCurrent roles and responsibilities Quiz co- authoring Quiz co- authoring Video filming (external contractor) Video filming (external contractor) Content tagging, rendering Content tagging, rendering Authoring, identify assets Authoring, identify assets Quiz testingQuiz testing Critical reading Critical reading Critical reading Critical reading Quiz building and testing Quiz building and testing Draft Course reviewing Draft Course reviewing Badge set upBadge set up Badge designBadge design
  28. 28. 28 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Development of new content and new practices Quiz co- authoring Quiz co- authoring University Partner Advice and guidance (on OEPS hub) Advice and guidance (on OEPS hub) Future roles and responsibilitiesFuture roles and responsibilities Video filming & editing (external contractor) Video filming & editing (external contractor) Authoring, identify assets Authoring, identify assets Quiz building and testing Quiz building and testing Critical reading Critical reading Draft Course reviewing Draft Course reviewing Badge design and set up Badge design and set up Content upload Content upload What services might be offered? What services might be offered?
  29. 29. 29 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Open production checklist  Allow time for discussion to understand about OER, purpose of online course, potential audience, open licenses, possible course structures and assessment options, including badging  Allow time to adapt existing materials as they might not be suitable for online learning – follow good practice guidelines for online learning  Agree roles and responsibilities for course management, authoring, asset compiling and creating, quiz writing and building, badge design, set up of course materials online, testing quiz, set up of badge, making course live  Use a sample schedule early in discussions to inform discussion, expectations, roles, responsibilities and future planning leading to an actual production schedule  Compile an asset register as the course is written to keep track of all assets, their Title, Author, Source and Licence (TASL)  Involve partner in every element of the process – enable them to take ownership  Use ‘How to make an open online course’ and ‘Becoming an open educator’ as good practice guidance
  30. 30. 30 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland What are the implications for Widening Participation? If partners use OER to fill structural holes in individual learning journeys, what are the implications for formal learning providers with a remit for widening participation in Higher Education? Does this exclude formal providers from widening participation? Do formal providers partner with external organisations to enhance the formal curriculum and fill these holes?
  31. 31. 31 Opening Educational Practices in Scotland References and courses Cannell, P., Macintyre, R. and Hewitt, L. (2015) ‘Widening access and OER: developing new practice’, Widening Participation and Lifelong Learning, 17(1), pp. 64-72. Kemmis, S. (2010). Research for praxis: Knowing doing Pedagogy, Culture and Society, 18, 1, 9- 27. Macintyre R. (2015) Designing Open Learning Journeys http://www.oeps.ac.uk/create-your- own/designing-open-learning-journeys [accessed March 2016] Understanding Parkinson’s http://www.open.edu/openlearncreate/UnderstandingParkinsons My Seaweed looks weird http://www.open.edu/openlearncreate/SAMS_SeaweedWeird Becoming an open educator http://www.open.edu/openlearncreate/becoming-open-educator How to make an open online course http://www.open.edu/openlearncreate/how-to-make-course
  32. 32. Opening Educational Practices in Scotland Contact Us: Email: OEPScotland@gmail.com Social media: @OEPScotland www.oepscotland.org www.oeps.ac.uk

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