Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Background note - Session 3 - Water and Sanitation

26 views

Published on

2019 Arab-DAC Dialogue on Development. Background note - Session 3 - Water and Sanitation.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Background note - Session 3 - Water and Sanitation

  1. 1. ACHIEVING SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION FOR ALL Water is essential to human survival and dignity. It is the basis for resilient, peaceful societies and a robust natural environment. Unlike other natural resources, water has no substitute. To achieve water security for all by 2030, providers of development co-operation will need to deliver greater partnership models and financing tools. This calls for collaboration between the Arab Coordination Group (ACG) and the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) towards achieving the UN Sustainability Development Goal SDG6 on sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. A number of ACG institutions and Switzerland, with support from the OECD, have already set up a ACG-DAC Task Force on Water, which proposes a way forward to structure joint work on water and sanitation in order to achieve greater impact, sustainability and effectiveness through harnessing the members’ complementary strengths. Key issues for discussion:  How can the ACG-DAC Task Force on Water and Sanitation best promote universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all (SDG 6) based on a holistic understanding of SDG 6 and its quantitative and qualitative targets, particularly in water-stressed regions of the Middle East and Africa?  To what extent do the proposed Terms of Reference for the ACG-DAC Task Force on Water and Sanitation, and the themes, areas and modalities for co-operation outlined therein, contribute towards achieving greater impact, sustainability and effectiveness when bringing about SDG 6? Would you agree with the list of countries selected for intervention?  What models for partnerships and sustainable finance for water can the ACG-DAC Task Force deploy to achieve SDG 6 and other water-related SDGs in these countries? What role can be seen for innovative financing approaches, which also include the private sector (blended finance, public-private partnerships, impact finance or, inter alia, Islamic finance)? Possible outcomes:  Collaborative approaches between the ACG and DAC communities contribute to increased effectiveness and sustainable impacts of interventions that ensure access to and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. Lessons learnt and good practices derived from joint actions can serve as a basis for replication in the future.  Content-related discussions reveal meaningful complementary ACG and DAC approaches and help roll-out joint action towards achieving water-related goals and to strengthening international water co-operation, while engaging in advocacy efforts at regional and global levels to achieve SDG 6, both quantitatively and qualitatively.  Collaboration through the ACG-DAC Task Force on Water and Sanitation advances with the approval of the draft Terms of Reference of the ACG-DAC Task Force on Water and Sanitation and the selection of a number of countries for intervention. THE 2019 ARAB-DAC DIALOGUE ON DEVELOPMENT 14 January 2019, Kuwait City, Kuwait 27 March 2017, Bern, Switzerland
  2. 2. Achieving universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development aims to effectively and efficiently tackle the numerous challenges of the 21st century. Among the most pressing of these challenges – not least due to the adverse effects of climate change, increased demands for economic growth and a rapidly growing world population – is sustainable water resources management. Water security, or lack thereof, has far-reaching consequences globally. According to WHO and UNICEF in 2017, 2.1 billion people lack access to safe drinking water and 4.7 billion people lack access to sanitation. As stated in an OECD report (2018), poor sanitation, water and hygiene led to 675,000 premature deaths and losses of up to 7% of GDP in certain countries in 2015. Water-related losses in agriculture, health, income, and property may result in a decline by as much as 6% of GDP by 2050 in some regions of the world.1 In fact, according to the 2015 World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report, water crises are among the greatest concerns – water being ranked as the global risk with the single greatest potential impact on economies – over the next ten years. Of the 33 countries the World Resources Institute identified as countries that will face extremely high water stress by 2040, 14 are located in the Middle East and 4 in northern Africa. In recognition of the vital role water plays for mankind’s well-being, sustenance and sustainable development, the Sustainable Development Goal SDG6 is entirely dedicated to water and sanitation and covers all aspects of the water cycle, including sustainable management of water, waste water and ecosystem resources. Sustainable water management will be crucially important for realising the whole 2030 Agenda, as SDG6 is highly interlinked with all other SDGs, including food security, health, resilient infrastructure, clean energy, climate action and peace. Moreover, access to potable water and sanitation is not only essential for sustained economic growth but also plays a significant role in the development of job opportunities, either directly related to water management (e.g. infrastructure, wastewater treatment) or in water-intensive economic sectors (e.g. agriculture, fishing, energy, industry, health). The role of water as an enabler of sustainable development and as a catalyst for peace, was most recently emphasized by the UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres, when he stated during the Launch of the International Decade for Action ‘Water for Sustainable Development’ 2018-2028, “without effective management of our water resources, we risk intensified disputes between communities and sectors and even increased tensions among nations”. This message is echoed by the High Level Panel on Water and Peace, which recommends a number of institutional and financing mechanisms to strengthen international water co-operation and harness the potential of water in peace building. Expanding collaboration on water and sanitation among Arab and DAC providers through the ACG-DAC Task Force on Water and Sanitation Both the Arab Coordination Group (ACG) and the OECD Development Assistance Committee (DAC) are committed to achieving the 2030 Agenda and the Sustainable Development Goals, including SDG6 and its quantitative and qualitative targets. Partnerships for the SDGs and moving towards an integrated, multi-stakeholder approach, that 1 OECD, 2018. ‘Financing Water – Investing in Sustainable Growth’. OECD Environment Policy Paper No. 11. Available at: http://www.oecd.org/water/Policy-Paper-Financing-Water-Investing-in-Sustainable-Growth.pdf
  3. 3. leverages the synergies of all involved, are also at the core of the SDGs, in particular SDG17. Consequently, collaboration and mutual inspiration are considered the best way forward to achieve the ambitious water-related targets of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Expanding collaboration in areas of common interest among Arab and DAC providers on sustainable management of water and sanitation for all is timely. Doing so through the Arab-DAC Dialogue, presents an opportunity to use an important platform to exchange ideas, share good practices, promote mutual learning and implement joint initiatives related to this important development issue. The 2017 Arab-DAC Dialogue on Development was followed by an Arab-Swiss Water Day, organised by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC). The Arab-Swiss Water Day aimed at exchanging knowledge, successful approaches and innovative partnership models towards achieving the water-related targets of the 2030 Agenda in an effective and sustainable way among participating Arab and DAC providers. One of the conclusions of the Arab-Swiss Water Day was to promote further collaboration on water and sanitation among Arab and DAC providers. Building on the positive momentum and fruitful discussions of the Arab-Swiss Water Day, an Arab-DAC Task Force on Water and Sanitation was proposed and subsequently established. For now, the Task Force comprises Switzerland2 (which leads on behalf of the DAC), the Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development (as leading institution among the ACG), the Islamic Development Bank, the Arab Bank for Economic Development in Africa, the Abu Dhabi Fund for Development, the Qatar Fund for Development and the Saudi Fund for Development, while the OECD provides support and facilitates the work of the Task Force. The Arab-DAC Task Force on Water and Sanitation provides a great opportunity to engage in collaborative action that contributes to increased effectiveness and sustainable impact of interventions in the field of water and sanitation. This is done through making use of the holistic approach of Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) and building on the partners’ complementary skills, networks, knowledge and resources. Participants at the 2019 Arab-DAC Dialogue are:  Invited to share their comments on the work of the Task Force to date and decide on the approval (or not) of the draft Terms of Reference of the ACG-DAC Task Force on Water and Sanitation;  Welcomed to signal interest in joining the Task Force; and  Requested to decide on the countries where the Task Force will focus, based on a scoping report prepared by the Task Force and which proposes for joint action to select a country from Sub-Saharan Africa and another country from the Middle East and North Africa. The report follows criteria put forward in the Terms of Reference. 2 Water has been a priority of Swiss foreign and development policy for a long time. Switzerland was instrumental in making water a goal of the UN’s 2030 Agenda. Furthermore, it had a leading role in launching the global Blue Peace Initiative and establishing the Global High-Level Panel on Water and Peace that developed a set of recommendations on water as an important factor to peace building.

×