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Session 5: Mainstreaming resilience - Sumedi Andono Mulyo-Bappenas

OECD Environment
Mar. 24, 2023
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Session 5: Mainstreaming resilience - Sumedi Andono Mulyo-Bappenas

  1. Sumedi Andono Mulyo Director For Planning and Developing National Infrastructure Project Deputy of Infrastructure, Ministry of Development Planning/Bappenas Bogor, 8th March 2023 Mainstreaming Resilience in Infrastructure Plans and Projects
  2. Outline • Indonesia Quality of Infrastructure in the Global Competitiveness Index • Indonesia Stock Infrastructure Data Indonesia Infrastructure Outlook 01 • Long-Term National Development Plan Progress • SDGs Achievement • Megatrend 2045 Infrastructure Target, Achievement and Forecast 2045 02 Infrastructure Development Issues 03 Improving Quality of Infrastructure Plan and Development Technology Disruption to Infrastructure Challenge in Infrastructure Development 04 05 06 • Disparity between Regional Development • Adapting the Concept of Resilient and Sustainability • Value Chain to Infrastructure Synergy • Prioritizing Institutional Framework • Electric Vehicle, Drone for Transport, Smart Logistic, Green Infrastructure, MLFF (Multi- Lane Free Flow, Artificial Intelligence
  3. • Indonesia Quality of Infrastructure in the Global Competitiveness Index • Indonesia Stock Infrastructure Data Indonesia Infrastructure Outlook 01
  4. 4 Indonesia Infrastructure Outlook Infrastructure Investment Needs for Infrastructure Sector Infrastructure Quality Infrastructure Stock Comparison of Indonesia and Developed Country In order to catch up the gap, Indonesia sets the infrastructure investment needs in RPJMN 2020 – 2024 USD 429.7 billion Infrastructure Investment in 2025 – 2045 (in USD)
  5. 5 Source: Global Infrastructure Outlook, 2017 Infrastructure Stock Comparing to Other Countries
  6. 02 • Long-Term National Development Plan Progress • SDGs Achievement • Megatrend 2045 Infrastructure Target, Achievement and Forecast 2045
  7. 7 Sustainable Infrastructure Development Target in RPJMN 2020 – 2024 In Supporting SDGs’ goals 7 7 The sustainable development goals in the RPJMN 2020-2024 are achieved through a number of key targets below: 2.500 Kms New Toll Road 6 Metropolitan City Urban Mass Transit System 21 New Airport Performance and management standardization 10 Main Port Sustainable Development in RPJMN 2020 – 2024 ❖ Sustainable development is development that can meet the needs of the present without sacrificing future generations, by prioritizing three- dimensional welfare (social, economic and environmental). ❖ The RPJMN 2020-2024 has mainstreamed 118 targets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). 46 Multifunction Dam 70% Housholds Occupying Adequate Housing 4 Million New House Connection of City Gas Pipe [2019 : 0.5 million house connection] Reduction of Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG) Towards a target of 29% by 2030 (Paris Agreement) 27,3% 100% Electrification Ratio Target Achievement of Renewable Energy Mix in 2025 The end of 2021 has only reached 11,5% 25% 100% Housing with Access to Drinking Water [2018 : 88%] 90% Housing with Access to Adequate Sanitation [2018 : 75%]
  8. 8 SDGs Achievement SGDs Achievement in 2021 Achieved Will be achieved/better Need special attention 222 Indicators that have Data Availability SOCIAL PILLAR (Data of 60/87 indicators are available) ECONOMY PILLAR (Data of 75/89 indicators are available) ENVIRONMENT PILLAR (Data of 57/77 indicators are available) LAW & GOVERNANCE PILLAR (Data of 30/36 indicators are available) 26% 22% 52% 25% 12% 63% 10 % 9 % 81% 23% 20% 57% • From 222 indicators that have been reported, mostly (63% or 141 indicators) have been achieved • A good advancement could be shown in the economy and environment development pillar • There are still 22% or 48 indicators that need special attention and need acceleration to be on the track • The data of 67 out of 289 indicators are still not available in 2021 thus need to strengthen in providing data
  9. 9 9 SOCIAL, CULTURAL AND ECONOMIC TRANSFORMATION must start in 2020-2024 to provide a solid foundation toward developed Indonesia Average Growth (%) 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2015 3.430 4,890 6.278 11.332 15.287 8.387 3.870 2043 Out from Middle Income Trap (MIT) IncomeperGDP (USD) 3,6% 5,4% 5,9% 6,7% 6,8% 6,6% 2019/2020 Becoming upper- middle income country (USD 4050) RPJMN 2020-2024 as starting point to achieve 2045 vision SDGs 2017-2030 From middle-income towards high-income country: 1. Encouraging social, cultural and economic transformation and acceleration. 2. Improving innovation, efficiency and regional competitiveness based on a circular economy. 3. Building infrastructure for interregional connectivity, and strengthening value chain at local, national, regional and global levels. 4. Optimizing science and technology in the development of renewable energy. 5. Promoting infrastructure and environmental governance for sustainable livelihood. 5th (USD 7.4trilion) 2045: Average Growth 2015-2045: 5.7% PDB Riil perKapita 5.0% Growth of Real GDP 25% Contribution of Eastern Region of Indonesia Growth of Real GDP percapita Developed Countries with GDP Indonesia Vision 2045: … Transformation and Acceleration ….
  10. 10 Global Demography World Urbanization Emerging Economies Role International Trade International Finance World population becomes9.45 billion (Asia55%). Global demographic trend promotesurbanization. migrationinflux.and ageingpopulation. 66percent of world population livesin citieswith 95%increasehappeningin emergingeconomies. T otal developingcountriesoutput accounts for 71%of world output withAsiaasthe biggest stimulant of 54%. Global tradegrowsat 3.4%annually . Developingcountriesbecometheglobal tradeand investment axiswith 6%growth per year. Domination of world currency shiftsfrom USDollars to multi currency.Emergingeconomiesfinancial assets projectedtoexceeddevelopedcountries. Global Megatrend 2045 Middle IncomeClass Theproportion of middle and upper incomeclassexceeds84%or 8.1 billion people.which isdominatedby Asiaand LatinAmerica. Natural ResourcesCompetition TheincreaseofAsian economyandAfrican population triggerscompetitiontoobtain natural resources.Technologicaladvancement increasethe efficiency of natural resources exploitation. Technology T echnological changetrend isdominated byICT .biotechnologyand genetic engineering.wearabledevices.renewable energy.automatization.andartificial intelligence. Climate Change Thechallengeof global warming increases (morefrequent extremeweather condition and long-termclimatechange).Global temperatureincreases3-3.5%without initiativetoreduceemission. Geopolitical Change Theincreaseof China’srole.MiddleE ast’svulnerability . and theincreaseof newclassand determininggroup.
  11. 11 Population Projection Scenario 2020-2045 Source: Deputy of Population and Manpower, Bappenas, 2023 • Civil Registry Service Office data: 275,361,267 people • Population Cencus (interim projection): 275,773,774 people • Working Age (15+): 76% and Elderly (60+): 10,7% India becoming a country with the biggest population since 2023 (this year) China is predicted that have been negativein growthsince 2021. Africa and South Asia are still high in population growth Indonesia is predicted will be replaced by Nigeria and Pakistan in 2045. IN 2045 (million people) IN 2025 (million people) India China USA INDONESIA Russian Japan India China USA Nigeria Pakistan INDONESIA Brazil Bangladesh Ethiopia 500.00 1,000.00 1,500.00 2,000.00 1,454.61 1,424.38 343.60 1,642.92 1,349.76 371.72 285.20 249.95 234.57 218.80 176.42 143.49 349.60 345.82 331.01 231.12 200.71 198.49 193.25 Pakistan Nigeria Brazil Bangladesh 121.96 D.R. Congo 500.00 1,000.00 1,500.00 2,000.00 500.00 1,000.00 1,500.00 2,000.00 OPTIMISM SCENARIO TFR become constant after achieving 2.0 IMR achieve 4.2 in 2045 (UHH = 80 years) YEAR 2045 (million) Population 331 Elderly (60+)(15.8%) 52.2 MANPOWER Working Age (15+) 266.9 Establishing HH 2.75 Workers 198.3 POVERTY HEADCOUNT Optimism: 0.68% 2.25 BAU: 2.8% 9.27
  12. 12 Direction of Infrastructure Development 2045: Equitable and Integrated Infrastructure Development 12 • Completion of main sections and connecting roads throughout the Island, • Road and rail-based urban mass public transportation for high-speed trains to anticipate mega urban and urbanization, • Sea and air transportation to support population mobility and distribution of goods inter regions, Direction ofInfrastructure Development: Increase the physical and virtual connectivity Promote equitable development inter regions Support for Basic Infrastructure Supporting Urban and Rural Development Anticipation of Natural Disasters and Climate Change • Sea transportation as the main element of maritime connectivity • Development of aero city areas and water airports, • Fulfillment of digital and virtual connectivity for all community groups, • Fulfillment of community access to basic infrastructure, Aerocity PLTN Airport & Pioneer Palapa Ring route Legenda Source: Visi Indonesia 2045 Main Street Large/Medium Railways Port
  13. 03 Infrastructure Development Issues • Disparity between Regional Development
  14. 14 Economic Aspect: Availability and Performance of Infrastructure is Not Optimal in Supporting Sustained Economic Growth ➢ Logistics Cost as a percentage of GDP reaches 24% (highest in Asia Pacific) ➢ Infrastructure performance is still low (Global Competitiveness Index (GCI) and Logistic Performance Index (LPI) are lagging behind) ➢ Infrastructure stock is still below average for developing and developed countries (43% vs average 70%) ➢ Electricity consumption per capita is still low compared to other ASEAN countries 100% 30% Surabaya Ambon Sumber: Kajian Bappenas, 2019 ➢ The imbalance between the average incoming and reverse cargo in the Eastern Region ➢ More than 12,000 villages (15%) are not covered by 4G (4% in non-3T areas and 11% in 3T areas) ➢ More than 4,500 districts (15%) are not connected to fiber optic networks Source: Kominfo, 2020 14 ➢ Inequality in the electrification ratio between the west- eastern regions of Indonesia Infrastructure Development Issues
  15. 15 Inter-regional Development Inequality Still Occurs SUMATERA Contribution 2000: 22.35 2010: 22.39 2020: 21.35 KALIMANTAN Contribution 2000: 9.53 2010: 9.41 2020: 7.95 JAVA-BALI Contribution 2000: 59.98 2010: 58.65 2020: 60.16 SULAWESI Contribution 2000: 4.2 2010: 5.19 2020: 6.67 NUSA TENGGARA Contribution 2000: 1.47 2010: 1.66 2020: 1.55 MALUKU Contribution 2000: 0.34 2010: 0.49 2020: 0.56 PAPUA Contribution 2000: 1.92 2010: 2.22 2020: 1.79 KBI*/West 2000: 82.54 2010: 81.30 2020: 81.51 KTI*/East 2000: 17.46 2010: 18.97 2020: 18.49 *) KBI: Sumatera, Java, Bali KTI: Nusa Tenggara, Kalimantan,Sulawesi, Maluku, Papua In the last 20 years, GDP Share is still dominated by KBI. In the future, it is necessary to have significant equity between KBI and KTI Source: BPS and Bappenas exercise per December 2022
  16. 16 Western Region Eastern Region Inequity of Infrastructure Development Infrastructure inequality is also reflected in the high cost of construction in the eastern region: hampering the development of social infrastructure (education, health). Sumber: KemenPUPR 2019, diolah Constuction Cost Index (IKK) Tahun 2020 Western Region Eastern Region Road length per area ratio (km/km2) Source: BPS 2020, proceed Road Infrastructure Availability in Eastern Region is Higher than Western Region 100% 30% Surabaya Ambon Source: Bappenas Study, 2019 Average arrival and return cargo of ships in Papua Low Reverse Load from Eastern Region: Limited Transshipment and Feeder Ports in the East
  17. 17 EQUALIZATION OF INFRASTRUCTURE CONNECTIVITY BETWEEN REGIONS (SEA AND AIR) Access to remote and outermost areas is provided through the construction of pioneer ports and airports Legenda: = Port City = Airport & Pioneer = ALKI Route = Main Domestic Shipping Lines 17 Transportation System to support population mobility and inter-regional distribution of goods Economic access in Eastern Indonesia begins with the development of port cities and utilizes the potential of international trade routes.
  18. 04 Improving Quality of Infrastructure Plan and Development • Adapting the Concept of Resilient and Sustainability • Value Chain to Infrastructure Synergy • Prioritizing Institutional Framework
  19. 19 Adapting Resilience and Sustainability Into Infrastructure Plans and Projects as a Standard Practice 4 Dimensions of Resilient for Sustainability Institutional Sustainability Social Environmental Economic Ensure good governance : ❖ Transparency ❖ Accountability ❖ Measurability ❖ Trackability of results • Establish funding and financing framework which prioritize private funding and put the state budget as last-resource • Establish The Job Creation Act (UU Cipta Kerja) to attract business entities for infrastructure investment Enhance the Attractiveness of Infrastructure Projects for Private Funding Create a strong infrastructure market as having: • Long term pipeline of projects/program • Prioritize outcome and service delivery • Innovation, responsiveness and ability to scale-up Create Markets for Infrastructure Projects and Services • Developing electric vehicle • drone for transportation • smart logistic technology • maximize the utilization of hydrogen energy • prioritizing green infrastructure • adapting the MLFF (Multi- Lane Free Flow) for Toll Road Overhaul Infrastructure for Radical Innovation and Productivity Growth Government Approach for Mainstreaming Resilient in Infrastructure Plan and Projects:
  20. 20 Infrastructure Development in Strengthening Rural-Urban Linkages ... Connecting and Developing Rural-Urban Infrastructure... Natural Rural Rural Town Suburban Residental Suburban Commercial Urban General Metro politan Mega politan Value Chain Movement in General Production Manufacturing Main Market Supported by effective distribution, capable warehouse, and efficient transportation facility Notes: In the context of human movement (urbanization), it is important for the Government to ensure the provision of means to improve the quality of human resources and fulfillment of basic services. If they fail to do so, urbanization will lead to slump areas and urban sprawl. Local Gov, Ministry of Village, Development of Disadvantaged Regions., Ministry of Agriculture, Ministry of Marine and Fishery, and Ministry of Public Works and Housing Private, Business Entity, SOEs, Ministry of Industry Ministry of Trade, SOEs, Custom Clearence Each Region has a Service Standard Human Resources Quality Relatively Improved Dominated by Goods Market Dominated by Service Market
  21. 21 1. Ministry of Transportation 2. Ministry of Trade 3. Ministry of Foreign Affair 4. Custom Duty 5. SOEs 6. Transport Dept 7. Trade Dept. 1. Market Information 2. Promotion 3. Financing and Marketing Cooperation 1. Land 2. Seeds/Seeds 3. Fertilizer 4. Pesticide 5. Labor 6. Equipment 7. Technology 8. Dam and Pond 9. Irrigation Production Input Export Local 1. MSME 2. Private 3. Ministry of Industry 4. Ministry of Research Technology/BPPT 5. Ministry of SOEs 6. Department of Agriculture 7. Department of Industry 1. Road and Bridge 2. Ship 3. Airplane 4. River, Sea and Lake Transportation 1. Warehousing 2. Airport and Airplane 3. Port and Ship 1. Clean water 2. Electricity 3. Skilled and Trained Labor 4. Equipment and Machinery 5. Technology Accumulation of Value Added, Income, Surplus and Savings Accumulation of Value Added, Income, Surplus and Savings 1. Ministry of Transportation 2. Ministry of PUPR 3. Ministry of Trade 4. BUMN 5. Department of Transportation 6. Department of Commerce 1. Ministry of PUPR 2. Ministry of Transportation 3. Department of Transportation Digital Transformation 1. One Data One Map Policy 2. Spatial Plan 3. Strategic environmental studies 4. Disaster Risk Assessment 5. Water Avalibity Study 6. Socio-Cultural Studies Agrarian Reform STRENGHTEN VALUE CHAIN SYNERGY 21 Production Manufacturing Distribution Logistic and Transportation Market Featured Commodities: • Agriculture: Rice, Corn, Cassava, etc • Plantation: Palm, Coconut, Cocoa, Sugar Cane, etc • Fishery: seaweed, fish, shrimp, etc • Industry: IRT, Processing Industry • Mining: oil and gas and non-oil Duties and Roles of Bappenas, Local Governments and Ministries/Agencies: 1. Mapping the value chain for each type of tourism 2. Analyze bottlenecks and their causes 3. Understanding the behavior of the community, local government and business actors. 4. Identify and analyze priority activities and outputs of Ministries/Agencies and Local Governments to overcome obstacles in value chain development. 5. Formulate priority activities and outputs taking into account the regulatory framework, organizational framework and investment framework. 1. Farmer 2. Fisherman 3. MSME 4. Department of Agriculture 5. Marine Department 6. Spatial Planning 7. Ministry of Agriculture 8. Ministry of Marine Affairs 9. Ministry of ATR/BPN 10.SOEs 11.Private Company
  22. 22 STRENGHTEN VALUE CHAIN SYNERGY Travel Plan International Domestic 1. MSME 2. Private Company 3. Ministry of Tourism 4. Ministry of SOEs 5. Government tourism office 6. Department of Energy and Mineral Resources 1. Arts and Culture Festival 2. Religious Festival 3. Culinary Festival 4. Tourist Attractions 5. Sports Competition Integrated Transportation 1. Land 2. Airport 3. Seaport 4. River and Lake 1. Craft Industry 2. Small-scale industry 3. Textile industry 4. Food and Beverage Industry 1. Hotels and Motels 2. Clean water 3. Electricity 4. Internet 5. Skilled and Trained Labor Accumulation of Value Added, Income, Surplus and Savings Accumulation of Value Added, Income, Surplus and Savings 1. Ministry of Transportation 2. Ministry of Public Works 3. State Owned Enterprises 4. LG Owned Enterprises 5. Government tourism office 6. Department of Transportation 7. Public Works Department Featured Tourism: 1. Nature Tour 2. Marine tourism 3. Culinary tour 4. Religious Tourism 5. Culture tour 6. History Tour 7. Sports Tour 1. MSME 2. Businessmen 3. Department of Industry and Trade 4. Department of Agriculture 5. Fisheries Service 6. Ministry of Trade 7. SOE Digital Transformation 1. Natural tourism 2. Marine tourism 3. Culinary tour 4. Religious Tourism 5. Culture tour 6. Sports Tour 1. Village government 2. MSME 3. Businessmen 4. Department of Agriculture 5. Ministry of Education and Culture 6. Ministry of Tourism 1. Village government 2. MSME 3. Businessmen 4. Department of Agriculture 5. Ministry of Education and Culture 6. Ministry of Tourism 1. One Data One Map Policy 2. Spatial Plan 3. Strategic environmental studies 4. Disaster Risk Assessment 5. Water Availability Study 6. Socio-Cultural Studies Duties and Roles of Bappenas, Local Governments and Ministries/Agencies: 1. Mapping the value chain for each type of tourism 2. Analyze bottlenecks and their causes 3. Understanding the behavior of the community, local government and business actors. 4. Identify and analyze priority activities and outputs of Ministries/Agencies and Local Governments to overcome obstacles in value chain development. 5. Formulate priority activities and outputs taking into account the regulatory framework, organizational framework and investment framework. Transportation Accomodation Destinantion and Attraction Amenity: Cullinary and Entertainment Markets and Shopping Centers Transportation
  23. 23 Government Institution Framework to Resilient Infrastructure Plan (Based on Mid-Term Development Plan 2020-2024) Human Development INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURING PRIORITIES Economic Development Infrastructure Development Political, Legal, and Security Development Regional Development Principles of Indonesia Institutional Framework
  24. 05 Technology Disruption to Infrastructure • Electric Vehicles, Drone for Transport, Smart Logistic, Green Infrastructure, MLFF (Multi-Lane Free Flow, Artificial Intelligence
  25. 25 Technological Disruption to Infrastructure Electric Bus Smart Logistic Delivery Drone Smart Farming Autonomous Vehicle Multi Lane Free Flow
  26. 26 Logistics to Support Maritime ➢ Strengthening international and domestic connectivity through Integrated Port Network & Integrated Airport Network ➢ Sea Transportation Backbone Efficiency to reduce logistics costs • Hub port development: Kijing New Port, New Priok Port, Patimban Port (container and vehicle terminals) ➢ Air Transport Backbone Efficiency through standardization of primary hub airports, development of secondary & feeder hub airports, water airports, and seaplanes. Superhub IKN Belawan & Kuala Tanjung Port Soekarno Hatta Hub Airport Ngurah Rai Hub Airport Bandara Hub Sepinggan International Hub Sam Ratulangi Bitung Port Bandara Hub Kualanamu Plb. K. Samboja Balikpapan Port Plb. Kariangau SINGAPORE KUALA LUMPUR YKIA Hub Airport Tj Priok/Patimban Port Tj Perak Port Djuanda Airport Makassar Port Plb. Kijing Ambon Port Sorong Port Sama- rinda IKN Balik- papan Feeder Port Sea Toll Route Backbone Port Hub Legend: Airport Hub Foreign Port Air Route Backbone International Route Subsidized Sea Toll West Hub Central Hub East Hub
  27. 27 Increased capacity and quality of natural resource management services. Establishment of better communications and telecommunications networks, including the provision of high-speed internet access. Increased investment in the transportation sector, including ports, roads, railways and airports. Increased investment in the energy sector, including the development of electricity networks, the construction of gas networks, and easy access to new and renewable energy. Increased investment in the fisheries and marine sector, including investment in marine resource management technology and infrastructure to increase the productivity and efficiency of the fishing industry Increased investment in the tourism sector, including improving the quality of tourism infrastructure in all coastal and marine areas of Indonesia. Increased investment in the education sector, including the development of maritime education. Increased investment in the logistics sector, including the development of a better logistics network to improve the mobility of goods and services. Increased investment in the information technology sector, including improved access and quality of telecommunications services, application services, and information technology. Infrastructure Development Supporting Indonesia as a Sovereign, Advanced, and Sustainable Maritime State
  28. 06 Challenge in Infrastructure Development
  29. 29 Challenge to Adapt Resilience Aspect on Infrastructure Plan Coordination among stakeholders to pursue the actions is the key for the success of completion of action Difficulties of strong commitment and consistency of stakeholders due to political issues Implementation of new (revised) related regulations particularly at regional level require an extra effort of resources Difficulties of integrating social, environmental and economic aspects to establish resilient infrastructure due to different authorities among the aspects 1 2 3 4
  30. THANK YOU Directorate Of Planning and Developing National Infrastructure Project Deputy of Infrastructure Ministry of Development Planning/Bappenas
  31. 31 RPJMN Achievements and Evaluation INCREASING OF BASIC INFRASTRUCTURE PROVISION ➢ Household in decent and affordable housing (percent) ➢ Mortgage to GDP Ratio (percent) 2019 57 % 60% 2020 61 % 2021 64% 2024 Target 70 % Performance Progress : • Increased (moderate) 2019 3 % 2020 2024 Target Performance Progress : • Stagnan 2021 ➢ Household occupying housing with access to decent and safe drinking water (percent) 2019 89 Decent and 7 safe 2020 2021 2022 prognosa 2024 Target Performance Progress : • Increased (On The Track 3 % 3 % 3 % 4 % 90 Decent and 12 safe 91 Decent and 12 safe 93 Decent and 13 safe 100 Decent and 15 safe 2022 prognosa 2022 prognosa ➢ Household with access to piped water (percent) 2019 20 % 21% 2020 19 % 2021 23 % 2024 Target 30 % Performance Progress : • Decreased 2022 prognosa ➢ Household occupying housing with access to proper and safe sanitation (domestic water) (percent) Performance Progress : • Increased (moderate) 2019 77 Decent and 7 safe 2020 2021 2024 Target 79 Decent and 8 safe 80 Decent and 7 safe 82 Decent and 13 safe 90 Decent and 15 safe ➢ Number of house connections served by SPALD-T at settlement/city/regional scale (households) 2019 1.3 Million Improvement of 167, 291 HH 2020 2021 2024 Target Performance Progress : • Not yet concluded 2022 prognosa 2022 prognosa Improvement of 30,529 HH Improvement of 19,333 HH 3 Million
  32. 32 RPJMN Achievements and Evaluation INCREASING OF BASIC INFRASTRUCTURE PROVISION ➢ Number of households served by desludging treatment plant (households) ➢ Households still practicing open defecation in the open area (percent) 2019 N/A 2020 2021 2024 Target Performance Progress : • Not Yet Concluded 2019 7.60 % 2020 2024 Target Performance Progress : • Increased (On The Track 2021 ➢ Household residing in housing with access to well-managed waste in urban areas (percent) 2019 59 Handling and 1 reduction 2020 2021 2022 prognosa 2024 Target Performance Progress : • Decreased 6.19 % 5.69 % 2.98 % 0 % N/A N/A 80 Handling and 20 Reduction 2022 prognosa 2022 prognosa Improvement of 185,490 HH Improvement of 79,518 HH Improvement of 0 HH 6.5 Million 55 Handling and 1 reduction
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