Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

1

Share

Download to read offline

Reynaldi Hermansjah - Financing Renewable Energy in Indonesia

Download to read offline

OECD-ADB High-level Roundtable on Green Finance Opportunities in ASEAN, 31 October 2019, OECD, Paris, France

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Reynaldi Hermansjah - Financing Renewable Energy in Indonesia

  1. 1. DISCLAIMER This presentation has been prepared by PT Indonesia Infrastructure Finance (“IIF” or the “Company”) exclusively for the indicated purpose. Terms contained in this presentation are intended for discussion purposes only and are subject to a definitive agreement. All information contained in this presentation belongs to IIF and may not be copied, distributed or otherwise disseminated in whole or in part without the prior written consent of IIF. This presentation has been prepared on the basis of information that is believed to be correct at the time the presentation was prepared, but that may not have been independently verified. IIF makes no express or implied warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of any such information. IIF is not acting as an advisor or agent to any person to whom this presentation is directed. Such persons must make their own independent assessment of the contents of this presentation, should not treat such content as advice relating to legal, accounting, taxation, technical or investment matters and should consult their own advisers. Nothing in this presentation is intended to be, or should be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or invitation to subscribe for, any securities. Neither the Company nor any of their directors, employees or representatives are to have any liability (including liability to any person by reason of negligence or negligent misstatement) from any statement, opinion, information or matter (express or implied) arising out of, contained in or derived from or any omission from the presentation, except liability under statute that cannot be excluded. 2
  2. 2. AGENDA 3 01 02 04 IIF Profile IIF Capabilities and Financing Considerations Challenges in Financing Renewable Energy Projects 05 Success Story 03 Indonesia: 5 Year Infrastructure Project Profile
  3. 3. IIF Profile Agenda 1
  4. 4. IIF Profile 5 To become the leading catalyst for financing infrastructure development in Indonesia. • To ensure investors’ needs are reflected in contractual structures and concessions. • To lead in offering a mix of financing instruments appropriate for infrastructure projects. • To work with Indonesia’s financial institutions and other institutional investors to channel the public’s saving into long term development of Indonesia’s Infrastructure. IIF’s Vision & Mission • IIF is a private company providing infrastructure financing and advisory services, focuses on commercially viable infrastructure projects. • IIF’s purpose is to be a catalyst to accelerate and to improve private participation in infrastructure development. • IIF applies international best practices in credit, risk management, corporate governance, and social & environmental protection to ensure sustainability of infrastructure development in Indonesia. Brief Overview SHAREHOLDERS 19.99% 15.12% 14.90% 30.00% 19.99%
  5. 5. The Mandated Infrastructure Sectors 6 EXPANDED INFRASTRUCTURE SECTORINITIAL INFRASTRUCTURE SECTOR Drinking Water Waste Water Telecommunications & Informatics Road Electricity Irrigation Transportation Oil & Gas ▪ SOCIAL INFRASTRUCTURE: • Urban Facility • Education Facility • Sports and Arts Facility • Territory Facility • Tourism Facility • Health Facility • Penintiary Facility • Public Housing • WASTE: Waste Management System • ELECTRICITY: Energy Conservation • OIL AND GAS: Renewable Energy • AGRICULTURE: Food Distribution and Warehouse • MANAGEMENT OF INDUSTRIAL TERRITORY: land acquisition, infrastructure development & management
  6. 6. Financing Products & Advisory Services 7 • Leading expertise in PPP transaction and project financing • Financial advisory capability • Government policy • Social & Environment expertise Advisory To act as a catalyst for private sector investments into Indonesian infrastructure Investment • Long term financing, in Rupiah and US Dollar • Project finance capability • Expertise in infrastructure financing Fund Based: • Senior Loan • Subordinate Financing / Mezzanine • Equity Investment Non Fund Based: • Guarantee • Stand-by finance • Fund raising arranger Investment Products • Project Preparation • Transaction Arranger • Financial Advisor • Capacity building for Social & Environment aspect • Social & Environment due diligence Advisory Services Social & Environmental Principles and International Standard Practices Business Division
  7. 7. IIF Capabilities and Financing Considerations Agenda 2
  8. 8. Support in All Stages of Project Development 9 Project Preparation Tender Project Construction Project Operation End of Concession Project Life Cycle Financing & Investment Products Fund Based Non- Fund Based Senior Loan Subordinated Finance (Mezzanine) Refinancing Share Investment Guarantee Stand-by Finance Business Model Advisory Products & Services Public and Private Institu- tion Financial Advisory FS Preparation Strategy & Business Advisory Policy Advisory Transaction Advisory Economic and/or Financial Assessment
  9. 9. IIF’s S&E Principles 7 ❑ Principle 1: Social & Environmental Assessment & Management System (SEMS) ❑ Principle 2: Labor & Working Conditions ❑ Principle 3: Pollution Prevention, Abatement & Climate Change ❑ Principle 4: Community Health, Safety & Security/Dam Safety ❑ Principle 5: Land Acquisition & Involuntary Resettlement ❑ Principle 6: Biodiversity Conservation & Sustainable Natural Resource Management ❑ Principle 7: Indigenous Peoples (IP) ❑ Principle 8: Cultural Property & Heritage IIF’s S&E Principles is an integrated social & environmental principles to help clients identifying potential social & environmental risks and the impacts to the project so that each an every infrastructure project can benefit from internationally best practice of social & environment management and sustainability.
  10. 10. Promoting Sustainable Project Financing 7 At pre-financing stage, to identify the project- affected social & environment risks Action points with target achievement dates, implemented for project lifetime S & E Due Diligence Corrective Action Plan Sustainable Project Development & Operation Why? Minimize risks and impact to S&E through mitigation action, which will benefit the project company by minimizing time-loss (i.e. project interruption), conflicts from workers and surrounding community, and legal claims, whilst maintain good reputation. How? • Conduct gap analysis against IIF’s S&E Principles • Establish and agreed Corrective Action Plan (“CAP”) with the project company. • Support & monitor the compliance to CAP
  11. 11. Indonesia: 5 Year Infrastructure Project Profile Agenda 3
  12. 12. NATIONAL MID-TERM DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2020-2024 13 Jokowi’s vision for economic development (target economic growth: 5.4 – 6%) • Investment: remove barriers, improve taxation and boost human development index; • Infrastructure: improve transport and connectivity between agricultural production centers, industrial zones, special economic zones, and tourism destinations; and • 38 Major Projects, prominently is the “New Capital City” Project. Total Infrastructure Investment in 2020-2024: IDR 6,445 tn Government: IDR 2,385 tn (37%) SOEs: IDR 1,353 tn (21%) Private: IDR 2,707 tn (42%) Source: Bappenas Calculation (2019) Infrastructure Investment Funding Needs 2020-2024 to financefunded by IDR 89.4 T 19.2% State Budget • Basic infrastructure • Development of national palace, TNI/Polri’s strategic building • Official housing for government employee/TNI/Polri • Land acquisition • Open space • Military base to financefunded by IDR 253.4 T 54.4% PPP • Executive, legislative, and judiciary building • Development of main infrastructure (excluding ones developed by state budget) • Education and health facilities • Museum, penitentiary • Other supporting infrastructure to financefunded by IDR 123.2 T 26.4% Private (Including SOE) • Public housing • Development of university • Science-technopark • Expansion of airport, port, and toll road • Health facility • Shopping mall • MICE Financing for New Capital City involves Private/SOEs role PPP and Private are expected to be the main source for financing
  13. 13. INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT TARGET PERFORMANCE IN 2024 Basic Infrastructure Household on proper housing → 52.78% House with safe and proper drinking water access → 75.34% House with proper sanitation → 90%, including safe access 20% House connection with proper piped drinking water access → 24.45 million New irrigation network → 500 thousands hectares Additional industrial and domestic bulk water → 90 m3/second New multipurpose dam → 58 projects Water usage efficiency→ IDR 74,000/m3 Road accident fatality ratio → 1.37/10,000 vehicles Energy and Electricity CO2 emission in power plant → 323.9 million ton Electricity consumption per capita → 1.500 kwh City gas network → 4 million new house connection Economic Infrastructure High speed train → Jakarta- Surabaya and Jakarta- Bandung Cargo Train → Makassar- Parepare Main roads traveling time reduction → 2.2 hours/100 km New toll roads: 2,000 km New national roads: 2,500 km National road on great condition: 98% Looping shipping route→ 27% Standardization on performance and management of integrated port → 7 hub ports SAR response time → 30 minutes On Time Performance: 95% New airports → 25 Route developments → 30 new routes Urban Infrastructure Mass transportation → 6 metropolitan cities Housing with well-managed waste access → 80% managed 20% reduced Digital Transformation ICT Development Index → 5.0 – 5.3 Internet speed Fixed → 25 Mbps Mobile → 20 Mbps Fiber optic network coverage → 75% subdistrict Analog switch off → 100% digital broadcast 3 new unicorn startup → 100% digital broadcast Renewable Energy
  14. 14. RPJMN 2020-2024 MAJOR PROGRAMS ARE MOSTLY IN INFRASTRUCTURE SECTORS 15 Priority Program 1 BASIC INFRASTRUCTURE Provision of 100,000 unit of proper housing Enhancement of safe and proper sanitation access (waste water) Development of 10 million house connection to safe and proper drinking water access Citarum Harum management Expansion of clean water distribution in all region Integrated management of north coast of Java Development of Multipurpose dam and irrigation modernization ➢ Sea dike integrated Semarang- Demak toll road Priority Program 2 CONNECTIVITY STRENGTHENING Development of 7 integrated sea ports network Development of Cargo Train: ➢ Makassar- Parepare train Development of Trans Sumatera Toll Road Development of High Speed Train Jakarta- Semarang-Surabaya & Jakarta-Bandung Development of Trans Papua Road Development of Papua air connectivity Development of road in outermost islands (Morotai, Nias, Saumlaki, Sumba, etc) Priority Program 3 URBAN INFRASTRUCTURE Mass transportation system in 6 metropolitan cities ➢ Jakarta, Surabaya, Medan, Bandung, Semarang, and Makassar Development of city gas infrastructure Priority Program 4 ENERGY AND ELECTRICITY Completion of 35,000 MW program Refinery revitalization (Balikpapan, Cilacap, Balongan, Dumai) and Development of 2 new refinery (Tuban & Bontang) Development of Trans Kalimantan gas pipe Priority Program 5 DIGITAL TRANSFORMATION Digital transformation program ➢ Completion of IT infrastructure (multifunction satellite and last-mile) ➢ From other sectors (utilization)
  15. 15. INFRASTRUCTURE SECTOR UPDATE – RENEWABLE ENERGY 16 Project Name Status as of September 2019 Source: public information Sep 2019 Electricity • Key update on RUPTL 2019-2028: • Projected electricity need growth decreased from 6.86% and to 6.42% (this considered still too optimistic given average growth of 4.6% in the last 5-years). • Planned Power Plant Development slightly increased from 56.024 MW to 56.395 MW. • Energy Mix 2025 projected as: Coal 54.6%; Renewable Energy 23.0%; Gas 22.0%; and Fuel Oil 0.4%. • To help increase RE portfolio, PLN started the tender for several solar PV projects: • PLTS Cirata, tender process started in Q2 2019, floating solar PV with unsolicited proposal from Masdar (UAE group company). • PLTS Bali consisted of PLTS West Bali (25 MW) and PLTS East Bali (25 MW), will be in tender process Q3 2019. Update on RUPTL 2019-2028 • PLTSa DKI Jakarta: ground breaking has been held in Dec 2018; starting construction. • PLTSa Tangerang: preparing tender process, project award planned in Q4 2019. • PLTSa Legok Nangka: in project preparation phase; assisted by IFC and JICA. • PLTSa Semarang: in project preparation phase, assisted by Australian bilateral support (KIAT). • PLTSa Surakarta: Phase-1 operation planned in Q2 2019, Phase-2 COD planned in 2020. • PLTSa Surabaya: first unit in operation, second unit scheduled COD by end of 2019. • PLTSa Makassar: finalization of the Pre-FS, with bilateral support for South Korea (KEITI, KECC, and GTC). • PLTSa Denpasar: Project awarded to Indonesia-Power and Waskita Karta consortium, financial close and construction pending to enactment of local regulation on tipping fees. Waste-to-Energy Projects
  16. 16. INFRASTRUCTURE SECTOR UPDATE – OTHER SECTOR (1/2) 17 Increasing Number of Unsolicited Projects • Waskita Toll Road has successfully signed CSPA with Hongkong investor in which Solo-Ngawi and Ngawi-Kertosono toll roads are to be purchased by Road King Infrastructure at 1.06x PBV and 1.48x PBV respectively. • Remaining assets planned to be divested by PT Waskita Toll Road: Batang-Semarang, Depok- Antasari, Cinere-Serpong, and Krian-Bunder. Divestment on several SOE’s Toll Road Project Name Status as of September 2019 • In 2019, the newly opened 503 km-length Trans Sumatera Toll Road supported the flow of June Lebaran traffic. • In Sep 19, PT Pembangunan Perumahan (Persero) Tbk signed a toll road concession agreement with BPJT for 27 KM long Semarang-Demak with estimated project cost of IDR 15 tn. Trans Jawa and Trans Sumatera Toll Road • In the period 2018-2019, 11 proposals for the construction of unsolicited toll roads with investment costs of IDR 212.29 trillion have been proposed, of which awards pending to the completion and evaluation of project documents. One of them is Solo-Yogyakarta toll road which has been approved by PUPR, but still waiting for approval of the Governor of Yogyakarta. Source: public information Sep 2019 SPAM West Semarang SPAM Umbulan • Up to Sep 2019, construction progress achieve 2.4% with capacity 1.000 lps. This project will cover 420 thousand people. • The project received loan IDR 265 bio from BCA (project size IDR 417 bio). • IIF involved as preparation and transaction advisor for government institutions. • Construction progress has achieved 83.5%.. This project will cover 1.3 million people in East Java Province. • VGF valued IDR 818 bio, concession duration 25 years since construction finished, project size IDR 2.05 trillion. Toll Road Water SPAM-Regional • Ministry of PUPR is preparing Regional Water Supply Systems (SPAM-R), identifying legal and institutional needs to scale-up the SPAM-R nationwide, select willing local governments, develop National SPAM-R Plan, and preparing project Pre-FS with targeted completion in 2020.
  17. 17. INFRASTRUCTURE SECTOR UPDATE – OTHER SECTOR (2/2) 18 Project Name Status as of September 2019 Source: public information Sep 2019 Transportation • Project awarded to PT PP (Persero) as leader of consortium (other members include PT Bumi Karsa, PT China Communication Construction Engineering Indonesia, dan PT Iroda Mitra). • Financial close planned in Q2 2019, and COD by end of 2020. Project utilize availability payment scheme and design-build-finance-operation-maintenance for 18.5 years. Makassar – Parepare Railways Labuan Bajo Airport Hang Nadim Airport Patimban Seaport • MoT announced in early Oct 19 that a consortium consisting Cardig and Changi was the only bidder which passed the first stage of the bidding process. • After the second stage of the bidding process, MoT will be able to announce the definitive winner (expected end of year). • IIF, together with KPMG, is in final stage of documentation to advise one of the international consortiums. • RFP for the bidding process is expected to be issued in Q4 2019. • Scope of services: build a terminal for 2 airports, and a new cargo place, repairing terminal 1 airport. • Government has decided that Patimban Port is to be awarded to Indonesian and Japanese private sector, and that SOE is not allowed to participate • Cargo capacity of 3.5 million TEUs in Phase I, up to 5.5 million TEUs in Phase II and will reach 7.5 million TEUs in Phase III. • Initial operation expected in 2020, including car terminal with capacity up to 300,000 vehicles. • GoI offers a new airport project under PPP scheme located in Singkawang West Kalimantan in a market sounding event in Oct 19. • The airport development will need IDR 4.3 tn in investment and is projected to be completed in 2023. Singkawang Airport
  18. 18. Renewable Energy: Potential, Challenges and Solutions Agenda 4
  19. 19. 20 Indonesia Future Renewable Energy at Glance: It appears to be national strategic plan to achieve in the next 10 years Capacity 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 2026 2027 2028 Total Geothermal MW 190 151 147 455 245 415 2,759 45 145 55 4,607 Hydro MW 154 326 755 - 182 1,484 3,047 129 466 1,467 8,009 Mini Hydro MW 140 238 479 200 168 232 27 20 20 10 1,534 Solar MW 63 78 219 129 160 4 250 - 2 2 908 Wind MW - - 30 360 260 50 150 - - 5 855 Biomass MW 12 139 60 357 50 103 19 5 15 35 794 Ocean Wave MW - - 7 - - - - - - - 7 Total MW 560 933 1,697 1,501 1,065 1,065 6,251 199 648 1,574 16,714 2019-2028 TARGET ADDITIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY Geothermal 28% Hydro 48% Mini Hydro 9% Solar 5% Wind 5% Biomass 5% Ocean Wave 0.04% RENEWABLE ENERGY 2019-2028 MIX • Until May 2019, the new renewable energy mix had reached 13.42% with the largest portion being in hydro power. • By 2029, it is targeted that there will be significant additional electricity power from renewable energy sources. It is expected to increase by 16,714 MW installed capacity (c. 30% of total Energy Mix 56,395 MW). • From the total of 16,714 MW, Hydro Power Plant and Geothermal Power Plant accounts for 76% of target volume (eqv. 12,616 MW). • More than US$100 bio investments requirements
  20. 20. 21 Indonesia Future Renewable Energy at Glance: Optimization rate of renewable natural resources is considered low as not much energy has been produced from abundant sources No Renewable Energy Sources Potential Energy Installed Capacity Optimizat ion Rate 1 Geothermal 29,544 MW 1,438 MW 4.9% 2 Hydro 75,091 MW 4,827 MW 6.4% 3 Mini-Hydro 19,385 MW 197 MW 1.0% 4 Bio Energy 32,654 MW 1,671 MW 5.1% 5 Solar 207,898 MW 78 MW 0.1% 6 Wind 60,647 MW 3,1 MW 0.0% • Geothermal, Hydro, and Mini Hydro will be the key energy for most of Java, Sumatera, and Eastern Kalimantan. Potential Solar and Wind is distributed in Nusa Tenggara, Sulawesi, and Papua. • Bio Energy will be the alternatives in some highly populated city, i.e. Jakarta, Bandung, Semarang, Surabaya, and Makassar. Indonesia Potential Renewable Energy Sources Distribution Geothermal Hydro and Minihydro Biomass Solar Wind
  21. 21. • IIF commits to embrace Social & Environment awareness in every project that we are involved in. • Take or pay terms shall be regulated in all PPA • With the establishment of better supported infrastructure, such as: PLN transmission and road, absorbed electricity can be optimized. • In depth assessment on sponsor capacity (financial and experience in related business) shall be conducted. This is part of security assurance for the business continuation. • Negotiate for compensation for supply risk; i.e. Water Credit in PPA to compensate for low production due to low water debit 22 Challenges and Solutions for Renewable Energy Financing SOLUTION FOR EACH CHALLENGES • Sponsor capacity is critical during construction and operation stage • High dependency in natural condition (Debit water for hydro/ mini hydro; irradiance for solar) Supply Risk • High frequent maintenance lower transmitting hour • 20kV transmission line is typically susceptible to black out Low Electricity Absorption • Low feed in tariff • No LT Commitment (Annual Production Declaration instead of Long Term Take or Pay) • BOT Scheme limits IRR Bankability of PPA • Renewable energy project that is situated in forestry area or highly populated area are prone to social & environment issues • Dam in hydro projects should not negatively impact biodiversity Social and Environment Cost Overrun
  22. 22. S&E Assessment 7 Mini Hydro ▪ Catchment area ▪ Ecosystem services ▪ Cumulative impact ▪ Land acquisition ▪ Community perception ▪ Construction phase: mobilization & demobilization, landslide, sediment control, housekeeping, basecamp, community safety. Wind Farming ▪ Bird strike ▪ Shadow flicker ▪ Land acquisition ▪ Community perception ▪ Construction phase: mobilization & demobilization, housekeeping, community safety, basecamp. Solar PV ▪ Land acquisition ▪ Community perception ▪ Construction phase: mobilization & demobilization, landslide, housekeeping, basecamp. S&E aspect is unique on project by project basis, both due to the type of the power plant and the surrounding area of the project.
  23. 23. Success Story Agenda 5
  24. 24. Portfolio on Renewable Energy Project 25 Mini Hydro Power Plant ▪ 2X5MW mini hydro power plant in West Sumatra ▪ Senior Loan with 10 years tenor ▪ Greenfield Project Finance Wind Farm ▪ 70 MW wind power plant in South Sulawesi. ▪ Credit Guarantee with 16.5 years guarantee period ▪ Greenfield Project Finance Geothermal Power Plant ▪ 227 MW geothermal power plant in West Java. ▪ Bond holding with 15 years maturity ▪ US$ Green Bond 2MW Gorontalo solar-powered power plant ▪ 2 MW solar power plant in Gorontalo ▪ Senior Loan with 8 years tenor ▪ Greenfield Project Finance 180 MW Hydro power plant in Sumatra ▪ 2x90 MW hydro power plan in North Sumatera ▪ Senior Loan with 15 years tenor ▪ Operating Project Mini Hydro Power Plant ▪ 3X3.7MW mini hydro power plant in Sulawesi ▪ Senior Loan with 12 years tenor ▪ Greenfield Project Finance Mini Hydro Power Plant ▪ 2X5MW mini hydro power plant in North Sumatera ▪ Senior Loan with 15 years tenor ▪ Greenfield Project Finance
  25. 25. 26 Issues during early operation Initial plan Actions taken A 10 MW Mini-Hydro Power Plant Project in West Sumatera - This project is a 10 MW installed capacity mini hydro power plant that has reached COD in December 2016. Supported by average of 14.3 m3/s water discharge, the power plant has sufficient water supply to produce at full capacity. Given a sufficient water supply, project company targeted a 51.3% capacity factor every year. - Project company connected the power plan to low voltage transmission line of 20kV, which will switch to 150 kV transmission line upon the completion of new Substation in 2018. Absorbed electricity will be paid by PLN as the sole buyer under agreed Power Purchase Agreement (PPA). - After 1 year of operation, projects absorption rate was only 38% of total installed capacity. It reached the lowest average absorption rate in December 2017 of 1.5 MW (or 15% absorption rate). Low absorption rate in 2017 was caused by 2 main factors: (1) Low demand, (2) Delay in completion of new Substation. - There is no long term commitment in electricity absorption, production is declared annually and take or pay clause is not available in the PPA. - Increase Demand. Project company management has approached regional PLN for a wider coverage to grab additional demand. To ensure a better absorption rate, the company made investment to improve the transmission line capacity. - Performance Monitoring. To get early warning signal, IIF closely monitored monthly absorption rate and regularly conducted discussion with project management. In 2018, absorption rate recorded improvement and reached the highest absorption rate in 2019 (5.1 MW). On average, most mini hydro projects generate 60% absorption rate. Case Study
  26. 26. 27 Issues during early operation Initial plan Actions taken A 2 MW Solar Power Plant Project in Gorontalo - This project is a 2 MW installed capacity solar power plant that reached COD in February 2016. Project company agreed to sell the electricity to PLN under 20 years Power Purchase Agreement (PPA). This PPA was equipped with blackout compensation arrangement. This power house is connected to low voltage 20kV transmission line of Sulutenggo. - In the early stage of this project, project company expected the power plant to optimally produce the electricity during the daylight (6-8 hours). By having a sufficient irradiance in the area, management expected a stable production and absorption during operational. - In 2017, project company reported that they cannot reach the expected revenue due to blackout caused by extreme weather. - In addition, the blackout was often occurred during the peak hour of solar power plant, which last for 4 hours between 10.00 – 14.00. Furthermore, maintenance by local PLN to restore the blackout or to conduct regular maintenance also occurred at production peak hours and reduced company's production hour significantly - Along the transmission line, there were landslide points and fallen trees that interfere the transmission line during extreme weather. - Compensation arrangement in PPA. Project company is secured with blackout compensation arrangement in the PPA, that the company is able to maintain 85% of target revenue is achieved. - Undertaking from parent company. To make the project more bankable, IIF requested for undertaking from parents of project company to support the project company if any cash support is required. - Improvement on preventive action and maintenance hour. IIF requested the company to approach PLN so that they can make preventive actions and better plan their maintenance hours. - In 2018, absorption rate of project company reached 108% of annual declared production. Case Study
  • HendraKW

    Apr. 7, 2020

OECD-ADB High-level Roundtable on Green Finance Opportunities in ASEAN, 31 October 2019, OECD, Paris, France

Views

Total views

398

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

0

Actions

Downloads

21

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

1

×