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Innovation, Governance and Reform in Education How CERI Research can Inform the Debate

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This presentation was given by Dirk Van Damme, Head of CERI, at the opening session of the CERI Conference on Innovation, Governance and Reform in Education on 3 November 2014. It looks at the challenges for educational policy and reform, the role of innovation in education, the governance of education systems, as well as the important themes of trust, leadership, accountability, professionalism, and knowledge.

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Innovation, Governance and Reform in Education How CERI Research can Inform the Debate

  1. 1. INNOVATION, GOVERNANCE AND REFORM IN EDUCATION HOW CERI RESEARCH CAN INFORM THE DEBATE Dirk Van Damme, Head of CERI
  2. 2. Outline • Setting the scene: the big picture • The drama: the challenges for educational policy and reform • The plot: innovation in education • The meta-plot: governance of education systems • The stage: four themes and an overarching one
  3. 3. SETTING THE SCENE
  4. 4. Setting the scene – the big picture • Ever increasing educational attainment More people have benefited from education than even before
  5. 5. Setting the scene – the big picture • Ever increasing educational attainment • Growing impact of education on various social and economic outcomes An individual with a higher level of education is more likely to believe they have a say in government
  6. 6. Setting the scene – the big picture • Ever increasing educational attainment • Growing impact of education on various social and economic The participation outcomes of students in HE from low-educated • families is less than half of their share in the population But challenges remain and magnify – The equity and social mobility challenge
  7. 7. Setting the scene – the big picture • Ever increasing educational attainment • Growing impact of education on various social and economic outcomes • But challenges remain and magnify – The equity and social mobility challenge – The quality challenge
  8. 8. Setting the scene – the big picture • Ever increasing educational attainment • Growing impact of education on various social and economic outcomes In most countries the per student expenditure • But challenges remain has continued and to magnify increase – The equity and social mobility challenge – The quality challenge – The efficiency challenge
  9. 9. Setting the scene – the big picture • Ever increasing educational attainment • Growing impact of education on various social and economic outcomes • But challenges remain and magnify – The equity and social mobility challenge – The quality challenge – The efficiency challenge • Result is a widening gap between opportunities and expectations on one hand and challenges on other
  10. 10. THE DRAMA
  11. 11. The challenges for educational policy and reform • Challenges for education policy makers increase – Supporting the expansion of the system – Ensuring quality – Securing equitable access and opportunities – Meeting ever growing expectations • But in very difficult times – Deepening social problems – Doing more with less – Intensifying political and ideological differences
  12. 12. THE PLOT
  13. 13. Innovation in education • Innovation can be part of the answer – Reaping the potential benefits of technology
  14. 14. Innovation in education • Innovation can be part of the answer – Reaping the potential benefits of technology – Adapting teaching and learning to 21st century skills demand 65 60 55 50 45 40 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Routine manual Nonroutine manual Routine cognitive Nonroutine analytic Nonroutine interactive Source: Levy and Murnane, 2005 Mean task input as percentiles of the 1960 task distribution Economy-wide measures of routine and non-routine task input (US)
  15. 15. Innovation in education • Innovation can be part of the answer – Reaping the potential benefits of technology – Adapting teaching and learning to 21st century skills demand – Aligning pedagogy with recent research evidence on learning
  16. 16. Innovation in education • Innovation can be part of the answer – Reaping the potential benefits of technology – Adapting teaching and learning to 21st century skills demand – Aligning pedagogy with recent research evidence on learning • Dimensions of innovation
  17. 17. But are education systems ready for innovation? • Widely shared perception of slowness of reform and ‘resistance to innovation’ among policy makers and external stakeholders • Many examples of ill-conceived and badly implemented top-down innovation • Yet, evidence from CERI’s Measuring Innovation points at many examples of meaningful change
  18. 18. But are education systems ready for innovation? • Widely shared perception of slowness of reform and ‘resistance to innovation’ among policy makers and external stakeholders • Many examples of ill-conceived and badly implemented top-down innovation • Yet, evidence from CERI’s Measuring Innovation points at many examples of meaningful change • And, evidence in CERI’s Innovative Learning Environments present a rich reservoir of innovative energy
  19. 19. Innovation in education • = dynamic change that is intended to add value to the educational processes – To improve quality of processes and of learning outcomes – To enhance equity and equality of learning outcomes and learning opportunities – To improve efficiency, minimise costs and maximise value for money – To better adapt the system to societal needs and expectations
  20. 20. Innovation Reform Change Definition Implementation of improved ideas, knowledge and practices Structured and conscious process of producing change Transformation or alteration that may be an intended or unintended phenomenon Key characteristics Implies novelty and brings benefits Produces change (though in some cases only little or none) Is historical, contextual and processual Types Process, product, marketing and organisational Also: incremental, radical and systemic form Radical, incremental or systemic Differentiated by pace (continuous or episodic) and scope (convergent or radical) Innovation – reform – change
  21. 21. THE META-PLOT
  22. 22. Governance of innovation • Misconceptions about innovation in education result from divergent views on the governance of education systems • How to conceptualise and understand contemporary governance challenges in education? • Complexity can provide part of the answer.
  23. 23. Governing complexity • Decentralisation, deregulation, school autonomy
  24. 24. Governing complexity • Decentralisation, deregulation, school autonomy • Choice and competition • Multiplication of governance levels: multilevel governance • Multiplication of actors and stakeholders: multi-stakeholder governance • Professionalisation • Parents, civil society
  25. 25. Restructuring governance Source: Goldspink, 2007
  26. 26. THE STAGE
  27. 27. The stage: four themes and one overarching one
  28. 28. Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge Knowledge
  29. 29. Trust • Trust is essential in establishing the conditions for effective and sustainable innovative change – facilitating open communication, transparency, cooperation, prevention of abuse of power – enabling actors and stakeholders to take risks, facilitating interactions and co-operation, and reducing the need for control and monitoring
  30. 30. Interpersonal Trust Social Capital Community Stakeholders Families Learners EDUCATION Trust
  31. 31. Accountability • What kind of accountability systems are conducive to innovation? • Vertical accountability – Regulatory accountability – School performance accountability • Horizontal accountability – Professional accountability – Multi-stakeholder accountability
  32. 32. Teacher professionalism • Teachers as professionals of teaching and learning • Role of teachers as professionals radically changes the governance of education systems • Participation in professional learning communities becomes an important driver of innovation
  33. 33. Leadership • Processes of innovation in education critically depend on leadership for change – Central level: setting the discourse – School level: enabling change – Pedagogical leadership
  34. 34. Knowledge • Education, as a knowledge system, requires effective knowledge flows to inform effective innovation – R&D and educational research – ‘Useful’ pedagogical knowledge – Professional knowledge – Tacit knowledge – Other knowledge systems • Are knowledge systems in education sufficiently dynamic to support innovative change?
  35. 35. LET THE PLAY BEGIN!
  36. 36. Thank you ! dirk.vandamme@oecd.org www.oecd.org/edu/ceri twitter @VanDammeEDU 36

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