Flore-Anne Messy
Senior Policy Expert
Executive Secretary
of the International Network on Financial Education
OECD Financi...
1. Empowering financial consumers :
A necessity in an evolving societal & financial context
Financial consumer empowerment trilogy :
Global recognition
G20 (2010)
Principles
for Innovative
Financial Inclusion
G20 (...
Exceptional G20 recognition in 2013:
Tools to measure financial literacy
G20 recognition in 2013
Targeted financial literacy approaches : youth and women
G20 recognition in 2013:
Promoting National Strategies
Available resources on financial education
welcomed/endorsed by G20 in 2013
OECD/INFE contribution to Financial Education
OECD/International Network on Financial Education
(INFE) Priority areas of work
National Strategies for Financial Education :
OECD/INFE Principles and follow up work
National Strategy for Financial Education (NS)
DefinitionDefinition
Status of National Strategies Worldwide
National Strategy for Financial Education
Framework
Preparatory and diagnosis phase
Today’s session
THANK YOU!
Flore-anne.messy@oecd.org
www.financial-education.org
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Flore-Anne Messy - 2014 Symposium on Financial Education in Korea

2,024 views

Published on

This presentation by Flore-Anne Messy was made at the High-level Global Symposium on Financial Education: Promoting Long-term Savings and Investments in Korea which explored policies and good practices for supporting long-term savings and investments through financial education and financial consumer protection. Find out more at http://www.oecd.org/daf/fin/financial-education/globalsymposiumonfinancialeducationforlong-termsavingsandinvestments.htm

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,024
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
872
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
26
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Increasing transfer of risks to individuals
    More consumers have access or should have access to financial services
    More complex sophisticated financial landscape
    Prudential regulation and protection is not enough
    Healthy competition amongst financial providers
    Suitable financial innovation : providing incentives for their development and increasing use of relevant ones
    Robust and growing financial markets
    Financial inclusion : a demand-side complement to measures aimed at improving financial access
    Effectiveness of financial market conduct or consumer protection regulation
    Reduced welfare and corporate benefits and solidarities
    Growing variety and frequency of risks
    More and new consumers have access to financial services
    More and diverse providers
    More products; more complex products
    New technologies and related risks
    Gaps in FCP : Disclosure :
    more is less : too complex disclosure which is not tested
    Redress mechanism not always efficient
    Lack of harmonisation of the financial sector : regulatory arbitrage
    Negative consequences especially for vulnerable groups.
    Lack of coverage : uninsured individuals for basic and long-term risks -e.g. health, retirement, income replacement, liability- and large-scale risks – e.g.natural and industrial catastrophes, terrorism- may face dramatic situations in case of losses
    Inappropriate coverage (underestimation/inappropriate or useless coverage) may also entail unexpected costs which may harm to various extents households‘ budget and well-being.
    The most fragile are the less covered/insured and potentially the most affected (poorest, women, children, elderly, rural populations etc) which create further inequalities
    Costs and length of litigation and redress
  • Flore-Anne Messy - 2014 Symposium on Financial Education in Korea

    1. 1. Flore-Anne Messy Senior Policy Expert Executive Secretary of the International Network on Financial Education OECD Financial Affairs Division NATIONAL STRATEGIESNATIONAL STRATEGIES FOR FINANCIAL EDUCATION:FOR FINANCIAL EDUCATION: OECD/INFE PrinciplesOECD/INFE Principles The framework and worldwide statusThe framework and worldwide status High-level Global Symposium on Financial Education Promoting Long-term Saving and Investments, 26-27 February 2014
    2. 2. 1. Empowering financial consumers : A necessity in an evolving societal & financial context
    3. 3. Financial consumer empowerment trilogy : Global recognition G20 (2010) Principles for Innovative Financial Inclusion G20 (2011) High-Level Principles on Financial Consumer Protection developed by the OECD OECD/INFE High-Level Principles on National Strategies for Financial Education 2012
    4. 4. Exceptional G20 recognition in 2013: Tools to measure financial literacy
    5. 5. G20 recognition in 2013 Targeted financial literacy approaches : youth and women
    6. 6. G20 recognition in 2013: Promoting National Strategies
    7. 7. Available resources on financial education welcomed/endorsed by G20 in 2013
    8. 8. OECD/INFE contribution to Financial Education
    9. 9. OECD/International Network on Financial Education (INFE) Priority areas of work
    10. 10. National Strategies for Financial Education : OECD/INFE Principles and follow up work
    11. 11. National Strategy for Financial Education (NS) DefinitionDefinition
    12. 12. Status of National Strategies Worldwide
    13. 13. National Strategy for Financial Education Framework Preparatory and diagnosis phase
    14. 14. Today’s session
    15. 15. THANK YOU! Flore-anne.messy@oecd.org www.financial-education.org

    ×