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OECD Knowledge Partnership for Sustainable and Inclusive Infrastructure

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The OECD Knowledge Partnership for Sustainable and Inclusive Infrastructure will foster evidence-based analysis of the interaction between sustainability and inclusiveness goals. It will provide a knowledge-sharing platform that connects government, business and civil society stakeholders engaged in accelerating progress towards these goals. Find out more at
http://www.oecd.org/finance/Sustainable-Infrastructure-for-All.htm

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OECD Knowledge Partnership for Sustainable and Inclusive Infrastructure

  1. 1. Sustainable Infrastructure for All OECD Knowledge Partnership Sigita Strumskyte Coordinator for Gender and SDGs Environment Directorate, OECD
  2. 2. What’s the issue? 60% of greenhouse gas emissions are caused by the development and use of infrastructure 7 million deaths a year occur from pollution caused by transport, building and power generation 1.1 billion people – 14% of the global population – do not have access to electricity. 1 in 3 people worldwide lack access to safe drinking water In low-income countries, women and girls are responsible for over 70% of water and fuelwood collection. Less than 40% of OECD countries systematically estimate the potential CO2 emissions at the beginning of the infrastructure project development. Infrastructure financing needs estimated at USD 6.3 trillion per year until 2030, and 10% more (USD 0.6 trillion) to make it climate-compatible.
  3. 3. Key areas for action Enhanced accessibility to services for all - women, children, vulnerable groups and left behind regions Green cities and regions for equity and inclusion Sustainable finance and sound governance for infrastructure development Responsible business conduct
  4. 4. THE ACCESS GAP:  Infrastructure strategies for poorer regions and vulnerable communities.  The gender angle: 1 minute increase in commuting time in metropolitan areas reduces women’s labour force participation by 0.3% GOVERNANCE and EMPLOYMENT GAPS:  Less than 20% of leadership positions and workforce in the infrastructure sector are women  Less than 15% of engineering, construction graduates are women in OECD countries SOCIAL RISKS and ENVIRONMENTAL SPILLOVERS:  Impacts on public safety, human rights, land transfers, deforestation and ecosystems Pillar One: Infrastructure Inclusiveness Gaps Enhanced accessibility to services for all concerns regarding local communities affected by projects.
  5. 5. Pillar Two: Making cities sustainable and inclusive Cities and regions are critical actors in the global response to climate change Environmental and climate-related investment by level of government, 2000-2016  Cities are part of the climate problem  60%-80% of global energy consumption occurs in cities  70% of global greenhouse gas emissions occur in cities  But cities and regions are also part of the solution  In most countries, cities and regions are in charge of key responsibilities related to environment Key Question: How to strengthen the capacities of regions and cities to better mobilise and scale up green funding and financing tools to support the transition?
  6. 6. Pillar Two: Making cities sustainable and inclusive Examples of OECD tools to support better infrastructure investment across levels of government OECD Recommendation on Effective Public Investment across Levels of Government Access the Recommendation, toolkit and the 2019 monitoring report : https://www.oecd.org/effective-public-investment-toolkit/ OECD-UCLG: World Observatory on Subnational Government Finance and Investment Initiative Publication Country profiles of 120 countries Interactive database Website:www.sng-wofi.org
  7. 7. Pillar Three: Sustainable finance and sound governance for infrastructure at all levels of government OECD Framework for the Governance of Infrastructure  Practical governance tools to help policy makers improve the management of infrastructure policy from strategic planning to project-level delivery  In the process of being updated, it includes a special emphasis on regional, social, gender, and environmental perspectives. OECD Paris Collaborative on Green Budgeting:  Launched at the One Planet Summit in Paris in 2017  A co-ordinating platform for knowledge development, peer learning, and country support  Implementation platform for Principle 4 of the WB Coalition of Finance Minister on Climate Action
  8. 8. Pillar Three: Sustainable finance and sound governance for infrastructure at all levels of government “Green Budgeting” – a systematic approach to achieve our environmental commitments ...using the tools and processes of budgetary policy-making  by evaluating and improving the environmental impact of budgetary policies  assessing their coherence with national and international commitments  contributing to informed, evidence-based debate
  9. 9. Pillar Three: Sustainable finance and sound governance for infrastructure at all levels of government Mobilising private financing for sustainable infrastructure Massive need for investment in infrastructure to achieve climate goals. Yet traditional sources of infrastructure financing face limitations: The OECD is working on mobilising financing for sustainable infrastructure:  Diversifying financing sources and instruments.  Mobilising institutional investment (i.e. pension funds and insurance companies)  Integrating ESG criteria in infrastructure investing.  Supporting blended finance approaches.  Public finances unable to bear the burden of all this investment.  Banks face constraints as a result of liquidity rules.
  10. 10. Pillar Four: Responsible Business Conduct The OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises Most comprehensive International standard on responsible business conduct  Recommendations from governments to businesses  Endorsed by business, trade unions and civil society  Open to non-OECD members  Aligns with UNGPs/ILO core conventions  Government commitment - implementation / grievance mechanism : National Contact Points  Incorporate expectation of supply chain due diligence
  11. 11. The Knowledge Partnership for Sustainable Infrastructure  On-line repository of research and evidence on sustainable and inclusive infrastructure  Compendium of good practices and strategic policy guidance  Development of a Sustainability and Inclusiveness Project Assessment Toolkit  Partnerships for implementation
  12. 12. For more information and to engage with us: Thank you for your attention! oe.cd/sust-inf-all @OECD_ENV @OECD_BizFin Sigita.Strumskyte@oecd.org
  13. 13. 60% of greenhouse gas emissions are caused by the development and use of infrastructure 7 million deaths a year occur from pollution caused by transport, building and power generation  Enhanced accessibility to services for all - women, children, vulnerable groups and left behind regions  Sustainable cities and settlements – spatial and connectivity planning for equity and inclusion  Sustainable finance and sound governance for infrastructure development  Responsible business conduct oe.cd/sust-inf-all @OECD_ENV @OECD_BizFin Access to high-quality and sustainable infrastructure is an essential determinant of people’s well-being, equal opportunities and a basic requirement for businesses to prosper Pillars of the Partnership Sustainable Infrastructure for All OECD Knowledge Partnership The OECD is building a network of stakeholders that links its extensive knowledge communities to inform policy decisions for the transition to more sustainable and inclusive economies For more information and to engage with us:

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